•   
  •   
  •   

Politics What the House January 6 Committee could learn from Justice official who pushed election fraud theories

17:05  05 november  2021
17:05  05 november  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Bannon's been cited for contempt of Congress. But will he ever be forced to cooperate with the Jan. 6 probe?

  Bannon's been cited for contempt of Congress. But will he ever be forced to cooperate with the Jan. 6 probe? The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol faces a major test of its subpoena powers as the Justice Department considers whether to prosecute former Trump aide Steve Bannon for criminal contempt of Congress. Members of the select committee have repeatedly warned that there will be serious consequences for anyone who refuses to comply with subpoenas for testimony or documents with relevant information about the storming of the Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump, and the events leading up to it. “The Select Committee will not tolerate defiance of our subpoenas,” the committee’s chairman, Rep.

Former Justice Department official Jeffery Clark, appearing for an interview with the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection on Friday, may hold several answers to core questions about Donald Trump and the January 6 insurrection.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Acting Assistant U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Clark speaks next to Deputy U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen at a news conference at the Justice Department on October 21, 2020 in Washington, DC. © Yuri Gripas/Pool/Getty Images Acting Assistant U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Clark speaks next to Deputy U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen at a news conference at the Justice Department on October 21, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Clark was one of the prime officials within the Justice Department pushing to pursue unfounded claims of voter fraud in the weeks after the November election, and, according to officials who interacted with him, was in touch with Trump repeatedly about election fraud.

Website Run by ‘Dumbest Man on the Internet’ Helped Fuel Trump’s Effort to Cancel Democracy

  Website Run by ‘Dumbest Man on the Internet’ Helped Fuel Trump’s Effort to Cancel Democracy According to contemporaneous Justice Department notes taken during the end of Donald Trump’s time in office, the then-president directly and repeatedly berated his top federal law enforcers to back his election-fraud lies. But when they wouldn’t support his anti-democratic crusade, Trump resorted to accusing his senior DOJ officials of not being as extremely online as he was. For starters, he was chastising them for not reading enough of The Gateway Pundit. “You guys may not be following the internet the way I do,” then-President Trump told acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue during a Dec.

Though he has emerged as a central figure in Trump's efforts to enlist the Justice Department to help overturn the results of the 2020 election, Clark has yet to speak at length on the record about the matter.

So far, Clark is one of only a few then-Trump administration officials to have received a congressional subpoena. Clark's testimony was delayed until Friday, after he parted ways with a lawyer who was preparing him to the House last week.

Clark did not say if he was going to cooperate with the panel.

"I'm going in," Clark told CNN Friday morning upon walking into an office building.

Previously, Trump hasn't attempted to block former Justice Department officials from speaking to members of Congress about his election fraud antics, and Clark doesn't appear to have any extensive executive privilege shield available to him. Yet other officials from the Trump White House have delayed their testimonies, and Trump is already in court arguing to keep documents from his presidency private.

Smartmatic is suing right-wing media outlets Newsmax and OAN for defamation over election conspiracy theories

  Smartmatic is suing right-wing media outlets Newsmax and OAN for defamation over election conspiracy theories "The global repercussions for our company cannot be overstated," Smartmatic CEO Antonio Mugica said in a statement. "The global repercussions for our company cannot be overstated."Smartmatic, along with the rival election technology company Dominion Voting Systems, were both subjects of conspiracy theories falsely alleging they were in cahoots with each other, developed secret vote-flipping technology under the regime of now-dead Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, and manipulated the results of the 2020 presidential election.

As a sympathizer to election fraud conspiracy theories, Clark became Trump's most useful asset inside the Justice Department in the days before January 6. Clark helped Trump devise a plan to oust the then acting attorney general, place himself atop the department, and have the DOJ intervene in Georgia to set aside its voting results in order to sway the state toward Trump.

When Clark's superiors learned of his scheming with Trump in early January, they threatened to resign en masse.

Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, a member of the committee who also served as a House manager for Trump's impeachment related to January 6, told CNN previously he was "very eager" for Clark's testimony.

"Clark had a lot to do with this plan for January 6," Raskin said, "and he also was apparently making a play to become the Attorney General, which caused a huge number of lawyers to say they would resign immediately. So we would get something like the Saturday Night Massacre that took place back during the Watergate period."

Voting distrust likely to continue despite smooth election

  Voting distrust likely to continue despite smooth election ATLANTA (AP) — The first major election day following a year of relentless attacks on voting rights and election officials went off largely without a hitch. Unlike the 2020 presidential election, there were no claims of widespread fraud, ballots emerging mysteriously in the dark of night or compromised voting machines changing results. The relative calm was a relief to those who oversee elections, but will it matter to those who still believe last year's election was stolen from former President Donald Trump?Election experts say even a smooth election cycle this year is unlikely to curb the distrust that has built up over the last year within a segment of the public.

Raskin said the committee is interested in learning about any efforts behind the scenes at the Justice Department to oppose the certification of the Electoral College vote, the process that was interrupted when Trump supporters violently overran the Capitol.

Center of Senate report

Previously, the Senate Judiciary Committee released its own lengthy staff report detailing how Trump and his allies pressured DOJ to overturn the 2020 election. In that nearly 400-page report, Clark's name appears more than 200 times and casts him as the agency's pivotal figure helping Trump, according to other witnesses from the Justice Department.

In one particularly poignant scene, the report recounts a December 26 call that Clark received from then acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, who spoke at length with the Senate committee. Rosen wanted to know why Trump had mentioned Clark in a previous phone call. When Clark told Rosen he had previously met with Trump, Rosen called being "flabbergasted."

The Senate Judiciary Committee, which did not interview Clark for its investigation, described several other elected officials, lawyers working with Trump and even lower-level Justice Department employees who appeared to support Clark's efforts at DOJ.

Jan. 6 panel subpoenas 6 more Trump associates in probe

  Jan. 6 panel subpoenas 6 more Trump associates in probe WASHINGTON (AP) — Further expanding its probe, the U.S. House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection has issued subpoenas to six additional associates of former President Donald Trump who were closely involved in his efforts to overturn his defeat in the 2020 election. The committee's chairman, Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson, said in a statement Monday that the panel is demanding testimony and documents from former Trump campaign officials and others who participated in a “war room” ahead of the siege and strategized about how to halt the certification of Joe Biden’s victory.

The Senate report also noted a meeting just before Christmas Day where Trump met Clark and Republican congressmen at the White House.

But the report was unable to nail down the extent of coordination among the election fraud theorists without insight from inner-circle witnesses like Clark.

Handwritten notes

In addition to the characters around Trump, handwritten notes of a December 27 discussion between the President and top Justice Department officials document that Trump said he wanted to put Clark in a leadership role and that Republicans in Congress could promote Trump's election fraud theories. At the time of Clark's push, the DOJ had already determined the voter fraud theories were largely unfounded.

Trump's reference to Clark, an environmental lawyer temporarily filling the civil litigation leadership role at Justice "surprised" then-acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue "because Clark 'didn't have anything to do with the Department's election responsibilities,'" the Senate wrote, citing Donoghue's own testimony to the Committee.

Separately, Perry spoke to Donoghue about Clark as well, telling Donoghue he liked Clark and thought Clark could "do something about this," the Senate Judiciary Committee noted, again citing Donoghue's testimony.

House Jan. 6 panel subpoenas 10 former White House aides

  House Jan. 6 panel subpoenas 10 former White House aides WASHINGTON (AP) — House investigators issued subpoenas to 10 former officials who worked for Donald Trump at the end of his presidency, an effort to find out more about what the president was doing and saying as his supporters violently stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in a bid to overturn his defeat. The subpoenas issued Tuesday, which included demands for documents and testimony from former senior adviser Stephen Miller and former press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, bring the House panel tasked with investigating the insurrection even closer inside Trump’s inner circle — and closer to Trump himself.

By New Year's, Clark was asking for an intelligence briefing about election interference and sent Donoghue his proposal for the Justice Department to announce investigations into the vote in Georgia.

He and the DOJ leadership met with Trump on January 3. At that meeting, Donoghue and others told Trump there would be mass resignations at the Justice Department if the President were to fire the acting attorney general and put Clark in charge.

All of Clark's actions came at the end of December, "following personal communications with Trump, including at least one meeting that Clark attended in the Oval Office without the knowledge of DOJ leadership," the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote.

But they were not able to detail exactly what Trump has said. That work may be left for the House investigators.

a person wearing a suit and tie © CNN

Judge Tanya Chutkan's Ruling Against Donald Trump: Full Transcript .
The U.S. district judge wrote in her ruling against Trump that "Presidents are not kings, and Plaintiff is not President."Trump had sued Representative Bennie Thompson in his capacity as chair of the committee in order to prevent the committee from accessing documents in the National Archives.

usr: 1
This is interesting!