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Politics Biden, Democrats hit the road to show how new infrastructure law will help Americans

10:56  17 november  2021
10:56  17 november  2021 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Joe Biden's Remarkable Week May Just Rescue His Presidency

  Joe Biden's Remarkable Week May Just Rescue His Presidency A week ago Biden was staring into the abyss. By Saturday morning, the story was almost entirely different. Biden was able to celebrate "infrastructure week," making a dig at Donald Trump after the House passed the infrastructure bill with GOP support on Friday evening. Suddenly it was the Republicans who were at each other's throats, while in the Democratic Party, a Biden-brokered truce between moderates and progressives opened the door for yet more legislation."It was always likely that the Democrats would eventually reach sufficient agreement to pass the infrastructure bill," Quirk told Newsweek.

Still, Biden has pointed to some specifics as projects likely to get funded, such as an infamous bridge connecting Cincinnati and northern Kentucky, or expanding high-speed internet access in Ohio. And in New Hampshire on Tuesday, he even pointed out the annual cost he said New Hampshire residents pay Much of the federal dollars provided by the law will , though, go directly to states whose leaders will decide how to use them. New Hampshire is expected to receive .1 billion for federal-aid highways and 5 million for bridges, according to the White House. Some governors have outlined broad

President Joe Biden hit the road Tuesday a day after he signed the .2 trillion infrastructure bill into law , visiting a New Hampshire bridge in d Much of the federal dollars provided by the law will , though, go directly to states whose leaders will decide how to use them. New Hampshire is expected to receive .1 billion for federal-aid highways and 5 million for bridges, according to the White House. Some governors have outlined broad buckets -- while others have started pointing to specific impacts.

Fresh off signing the historic $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill into law, President Joe Biden hit the road Tuesday with his sales pitch, visiting a New Hampshire bridge in disrepair and hoping to translate the legislation into real terms for Americans.

"This is not something abstract," Biden said, standing in front of a decrepit bridge in a rural part of the Granite State and talking about the dangers of bridges collapsing, preventing school buses, fire trucks and other vehicles from taking lengthy detours. "This is real. This is real stuff."

With money from the complex legislative package doled out to states, cities and specific projects through a complicated series of formulas and grant programs -- some more immediate, others taking years to come to fruition -- Biden and Democrats are eager to take credit for their major, bipartisan legislative achievement.

Biden has reached a critical moment in the battle for blue-collar voters

  Biden has reached a critical moment in the battle for blue-collar voters Just as Democrats face another round of hand-wringing about their erosion among working-class and rural White voters -- after last week's daunting election results in Virginia and New Jersey -- the long-delayed congressional approval of a historic infrastructure plan will test President Joe Biden's central theory on how the party can reverse that decline. © Samuel Corum/Getty Images President Joe Biden speaks during a news conference in the State Dinning Room at the White House on Saturday, November 6, 2021.

Still, Biden has pointed to some specifics as projects likely to get funded, such as an infamous bridge connecting Cincinnati and northern Kentucky, or expanding high-speed internet access in Ohio. Before signing the bill Monday, the president said his message to the American people was “ America is Much of the federal dollars provided by the law will , though, go directly to states whose leaders will decide how to use them. New Hampshire is expected to receive .1 billion for federal-aid highways and 5 million for bridges, according to the White House. Some governors have outlined broad

President Biden planned Tuesday to visit an aging New Hampshire bridge to begin a new phase of the sales pitch for the bipartisan infrastructure law , as Democrats debate the social-spending and climate plan that represents another central piece of his agenda. Following a White House bill-signing event Monday attended by Democrats and Republicans, Mr. Biden was traveling to Woodstock, N.H., to the NH 175 bridge over the Pemigewasset River. The White House said the span was rated as structurally deficient and has been on the state’s “red list” of bridges in poor condition since 2013.

To that end, Democratic members of Congress are planning to hold 1,000 events before the end of the year to make clear to Americans "what we're doing in this package," according to the chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney of New York.

Every Democratic legislator will hold five events over the next six weeks, he said.

President Joe Biden delivers remarks on infrastructure construction projects from the NH 175 bridge across the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock, New Hampshire, Nov. 16, 2021. © Jonathan Ernst/Reuters President Joe Biden delivers remarks on infrastructure construction projects from the NH 175 bridge across the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock, New Hampshire, Nov. 16, 2021.

While the law itself and its individual components -- rebuilding and repairs bridges, ports and roads, expanding broadband internet, and more -- are widely popular, a new ABC News/Washington Post poll shows Americans aren't giving Biden credit for championing the law and getting it through Congress. The president's approval rating is at an all-time low at 41%.

Infrastructure bill saga shows Pelosi's tenuous grip on House Democrats

  Infrastructure bill saga shows Pelosi's tenuous grip on House Democrats It took House Speaker Nancy Pelosi nearly three months of wrangling the progressive and centrist factions in her caucus, last-minute delaying of votes, two Capitol Hill visits from President Joe Biden, a decoupling of the two halves of Democrats’ "Build Back Better" legislative agenda, and a bill-saving bump from 13 Republicans to pass a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill in a late-night vote. © Provided by Washington Examiner The saga demonstrates what a tenuous hold the speaker has over the House Democratic Caucus as she navigates its razor-thin majority, having only three votes to spare before Republican votes are needed to pass legisla

President Joe Biden heads to New Hampshire on Tuesday to sell his new infrastructure law , and will stand in front of what the state calls a “structurally deficient” bridge as he outlines how the .2 trillion package will help repair the nation’s roads and bridges. Rising consumer prices, inflation and shortages caused by the supply chain crisis are being felt by Americans across the country and are urgent concerns at the White House. Officials are hoping the law , which Biden and others in the administration are hitting the road to sell, will give the President a bump and whip up some

President Biden remarks on the Infrastructure law repairs and rebuilding roads and bridges in Woodstock, New Hampshire.

  Biden, Democrats hit the road to show how new infrastructure law will help Americans © Evan Vucci/AP MORE: Biden signs bipartisan infrastructure bill with Republicans on hand to celebrate win

Part of the messaging problem for Biden is the bureaucratic, complicated nature of the federal government.

It has proven difficult for the administration to point to specific projects that will definitely receive funding from the law, since much of where the dollars will end up will result from lengthy application processes, such as a state applying for money to replace a specific bridge.

President Joe Biden takes part in a signing ceremony for H.R. 3684, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on the South Lawn of the White House, Nov. 15, 2021. © Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images President Joe Biden takes part in a signing ceremony for H.R. 3684, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on the South Lawn of the White House, Nov. 15, 2021.

Still, Biden has pointed to some specifics as projects likely to get funded, such as an infamous bridge connecting Cincinnati and northern Kentucky, or expanding high-speed internet access in Ohio.

How Biden should sell his infrastructure bill

  How Biden should sell his infrastructure bill A majority of Americans do not know much about the legislation other than the price tag. In planning a series of visits to project sites around the country, the administration clearly recognizes that to get the credit he (and the Democrats) deserve, especially among working class and middle-class voters, Biden must become the nation's seller-in-chief. Since his talk at the kick-off event in Baltimore on Wednesday, in my judgment, was digressive and defensive, I propose here a more focused - and partisan - approach.

New offspring sign a historic $ 1.2 trillion construction bill into law , President Joe Biden hit the streets Tuesday with his office, visiting the New Hampshire bridge in disrepair and hopes to translate the law to Americans . With the money from the legislative process being given out to the states, cities and President Joe Biden participates in the signing of the HR 3684, Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on the South Lawn of the White House, November 15, 2021. While the law itself and its own products – rebuilding and repairing bridges, ports and roads , expanded online, and more – became popular

Even before Mr. Biden signed the law , New York Gov. Kathy Hochul announced that the state would use its portion of the money to avoid price and service changes to New York City’s subway, buses and two regional commuter rails. “This is not designed to be stimulus,” Cecilia Rouse, who chairs the White House Because Democrats are using a budget procedure called reconciliation to pass the bill with a simple majority, they cannot afford to lose a single vote in the Senate and no more than three votes in the House. The administration’s ability to raise taxes to pay for the spending has already run into

And in New Hampshire on Tuesday, he even pointed out the annual cost he said New Hampshire residents pay out of pocket because of the poor state of their highways.

"Driving on these roads that need repair cost New Hampshire drivers an estimated extra $476 every year per person driving, in gasoline repairs and long commute times," he said. "That's $476 in hidden tax on New Hampshire drivers as a result of deteriorating infrastructure."

Before signing the bill Monday, the president said his message to the American people was "America is moving again, and your life is going to change for the better."

"Today, I want you to know we hear you and we see you," Biden said during a bipartisan signing ceremony on the White House South Lawn. "The bill I’m about to sign ... is proof that despite the cynics, Democrats and Republicans can come together and deliver results."

His trip to New Hampshire Tuesday took him to the NH 175 bridge, which spans over the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock.

President Joe Biden speaks during a visit to the NH 175 bridge over the Pemigewasset River to promote infrastructure spending, Nov. 16, 2021, in Woodstock, N.H. © Evan Vucci/AP President Joe Biden speaks during a visit to the NH 175 bridge over the Pemigewasset River to promote infrastructure spending, Nov. 16, 2021, in Woodstock, N.H.

The bridge, according to the White House, has been on the state’s "red list" of bridges in poor condition since 2013. It’s one of 215 bridges and over 698 miles of highway in poor condition in the Granite State.

Biden and Harris hug and smile during infrastructure signing despite conflict rumors

  Biden and Harris hug and smile during infrastructure signing despite conflict rumors President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were all hugs and smiles during the bipartisan infrastructure bill signing ceremony Monday amid reports of growing White House tensions. © Provided by Washington Examiner Harris and her allies are said to be frustrated with her assignments, believing she has not been set up for success by the administration. Others in the West Wing are irritated by her performance in office and, especially, her staff. But none of this acrimony was on display as Biden and Harris joined together to affectionately celebrate a key legislative victory on infrastructure.

Much of the federal dollars provided by the law will, though, go directly to states whose leaders will decide how to use them.

MORE: Biden says passage of $1 trillion infrastructure bill a 'monumental step forward'

New Hampshire is expected to receive $1.1 billion for federal-aid highways and $225 million for bridges, according to the White House.

Some governors have outlined broad buckets -- while others have started pointing to specific impacts.

President Joe Biden boards Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, Nov. 16, 2021, for a trip to Woodstock, N.H., to promote his infrastructure bill. © Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images President Joe Biden boards Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, Nov. 16, 2021, for a trip to Woodstock, N.H., to promote his infrastructure bill.

On Monday, New York's Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul said the law would allow authorities to put off any subway fare hikes or reductions in service.

The legislation includes $110 billion for highways, bridges and roads; $65 billion to upgrade the nation's power grid; $39 billion for public transit; $65 billion to expand high-speed internet, targeting rural areas, and low-income communities; and $55 billion to invest in clean water, with money funneled to replace lead pipes and address water contamination.

With so much money, there is a lot of potential to reap the political benefits -- particularly when recent polling has Democrats fearing a drubbing in next year's midterm elections.

House Republican touts benefits of infrastructure law he voted against

  House Republican touts benefits of infrastructure law he voted against Alabama Republican Rep. Gary Palmer faced sharp criticism after he touted the benefits for his district of the new infrastructure law he voted against. On Monday, the same day President Joe Biden signed the $1.2 trillion bill into law, Palmer issued a press release taking credit for a provision he introduced directing $369 million to the Northern Beltline project, a 52-mile, six-lane corridor under construction in his home state.

Biden made that clear on Tuesday, when he repeatedly name-checked four Democratic members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives from New Hampshire, who were in attendance and who the president said were “laser-focused on your needs.”

“My message to the people of New Hampshire is simple,” the president said. “It's this: Because of this delegation, New Hampshire and America are moving again.”

People greet each other and President Joe Biden, center, after a ceremony to sign the © Leah Millis/Reuters People greet each other and President Joe Biden, center, after a ceremony to sign the "Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act", at the White House, Nov. 15, 2021.

According to a White House official, Biden’s trip to New Hampshire "marks the start of an administration-wide effort where the president, vice president, and Cabinet members will travel across the country promoting" the law and "communicating directly with the American people about how it will change their lives for the better.”

The official said they'd travel to "red states, blue states, big cities, small towns, rural areas, tribal communities, and more" and would "underscore what the law means in tangible terms."

But many of the states Biden, Harris and other officials are visiting in the next week have a common theme: They are political battlegrounds important to presidential elections.

The president planned to travel to Michigan on Wednesday, and Harris to Ohio on Friday. Other states Cabinet officials would visit included Arizona, Georgia and Texas, the White House official said.

President Joe Biden hugs Vice President Kamala Harris before signing the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill into law during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House, Nov. 15, 2021. © Susan Walsh/AP President Joe Biden hugs Vice President Kamala Harris before signing the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill into law during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House, Nov. 15, 2021.

The public relations blitz would also hit the airwaves, according to the official.

MORE: Economic discontent, criticisms of Biden lift GOP to record early advantage: POLL

Maloney, the congressman who is tasked with protecting Democrats' slim majority in 2022, said during their events, members of Congress will tout both the bipartisan infrastructure package and the president's yet-to-pass “Build Back Better” social bill.

"We are going to get it done,” he said. “We are going to tell them we did it. And we are going to tell them who the other side is."

What’s in the new infrastructure bill — and why it’s a big deal .
The Senate-approved bill would genuinely impact many people’s lives.The bill, passed in a bipartisan 69-30 vote on Tuesday, includes a lot of measures that will help current and future generations: a major expansion of high-speed internet; spending for roads, bridges, and public transit; and funding for clean drinking water. It includes new measures to combat climate change, like money for electric vehicles and modernizing the power grid.

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