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Politics More spending won't reduce racial poverty divides

08:05  25 november  2021
08:05  25 november  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

GOP weighs trapping Democrats in Trump’s budget

  GOP weighs trapping Democrats in Trump’s budget Democrats are working to negotiate a government funding deal, but Republicans have a long list of demands before they'll come to the table.Even as Congress prepares to kick the next spending cliff from Dec. 3 to the holidays, Democrats are clamoring to begin bipartisan negotiations on a sweeping government funding deal. But the GOP's burgeoning hardline approach to the talks threatens the majority party’s hopes of ushering in their own spending priorities.

The Biden administration and its allies, continuing their claims that anything and everything under the sun is racist, have a new target: infrastructure.

A child sits on a stoop in a working class section of Utica on May 14, 2012 in Utica, New York. Like many upstate New York communities, Utica is struggling to make the transition from a former manufacturing hub. © (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) A child sits on a stoop in a working class section of Utica on May 14, 2012 in Utica, New York. Like many upstate New York communities, Utica is struggling to make the transition from a former manufacturing hub.

We are told our very highways themselves are racist and, guess what, more government spending is the apparent solution. Two congressmen wrote earlier this year: "By investing in this critical work to reconnect communities, we begin to deconstruct a structurally racist highway system. … But much more is needed, including sustained, long-term investment, to make our urban landscapes more equitable."

Judge Rules Traffic Stop By Cops in Racial Profiling Case Unconstitutional, Tosses Evidence

  Judge Rules Traffic Stop By Cops in Racial Profiling Case Unconstitutional, Tosses Evidence In August 2019, trooper John Darcy pulled over a Black motorist. Moments before, he said the man looked like a "thug," pointing out his dreadlocks and shirt.The case is about Trooper John Darcy, who was recorded talking to a fellow trooper on a cruiser microphone before stopping a Black motorist through York in August 2019. Darcy said the man looked like a "thug," pointing out his dreadlocks and shirt, but also said he was not racially profiling the driver.

Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg says that massive government spending is needed to "deconstruct the racism that was built into the roadways," also repeating a debunked claim that overpasses were racist.

The idea that more federal government spending is needed to reduce racial equity gaps, whether that spending is on infrastructure or anything else, is simply not supported by the facts. Even though the federal government has spent more than $22 trillion since the 1960s attempting to eliminate poverty, poverty rates have remained largely unchanged since that time.

In fact, the fastest increase in black homeownership in American history occurred between 1880 and 1930, before federal government spending programs for poverty or housing were adopted. Meanwhile, the black homeownership rate today is about the same as it was in the 1960s. Another study shows that Housing and Urban Development Section 8 housing vouchers actually increase rents for the poor who are not receiving the vouchers since the increased rental demand created by the vouchers ends up increasing rents for everyone.

A breakdown of poverty in America is a mirror to the nation's reality

  A breakdown of poverty in America is a mirror to the nation's reality Among America’s population of 333 million are 724 billionaires and about 37 million people living below the federal poverty level.Dozens of OECD countries have substantially lower poverty levels than America. Some countries, including France, Ireland, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland, have poverty levels that are less than half the U.S. level.

A concrete example of the futility of government spending to reduce poverty in the city of Los Angeles’s recent initiative to build housing for the homeless, Proposition HHH. A report by the LA Controller's Office on the efficacy of the program showed an average cost upwards of a stunning $600,000 per unit to build housing for the homeless. Units were being built at a far slower pace than was promised by proponents. What’s worse, a significant portion of the funds was going to middlemen such as syndicators, underwriters, and lawyers, not to the actual housing developments. Such is the fate for the vast majority of government spending programs.

The Biden administration’s economic justice agenda of spending away racial inequity is actually hurting the vulnerable and poorest more than it is helping. The effects of inflation are disproportionately greater for poorer people. The national average for gas is $3.41 — that’s $1.29 more than a year ago. Yet, instead of pursuing policies that can alleviate the stress at the pump, this administration is spending billions on their pursuit of environmental justice.

What it takes to end the epidemics of obesity and food insecurity

  What it takes to end the epidemics of obesity and food insecurity Our policy choices have brought us here, but they can also chart a different path. Millions of families are affected by these epidemics every day. While they may appear different at first glance, a lack of economic opportunity and discrimination fuel both of them. That is why the burdens of obesity and food insecurity disproportionately affect people of color and those with low incomes. And the economic and health consequences of each are severe: Food insecurity is closely tied to poverty, and higher obesity rates increase the risk for many chronic health conditions.

So if government spending doesn't help to address poverty, what does?

To start, children born to two-parent married families have much better outcomes in nearly every measurable area. In fact, young people who graduate high school, get married, and wait until they are married to have children have less than a 2% chance of becoming poor. Increasing the share of two-parent married families is a critical policy solution to reducing poverty.

Such a solution could encompass reforming means-tested programs that penalize marriage among lower-income couples. One politically palatable way to do this could be to adopt a solution that is already in use, by the military, of promoting marriage by prioritizing married couples in benefits programs. Addressing the decimation of manufacturing, which has had a particularly devastating effect on all working-class people but especially black communities, must also be addressed.

Do not be misled. The Democratic Party's favored anti-poverty programs are largely designed for the financial and political benefit of their advocates. Let us reject these schemes and instead promote evidence-based solutions to address racial gaps in poverty.

A year later, Rhode Island buildings still say ‘Plantations’

  A year later, Rhode Island buildings still say ‘Plantations’ PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island dropped “Providence Plantations” from its name a year ago, but not from its buildings. Providence Plantations is written in the script in marble near the State House dome and on bronze plaques in the entryway. The state seal with the full former name is on the rotunda floor, the elevator doors, door numbers and directional signs. It's even on the rug in front of George Washington's portrait in the state room.Providence Plantations is written in the script in marble near the State House dome and on bronze plaques in the entryway. The state seal with the full former name is on the rotunda floor, the elevator doors, door numbers and directional signs.

Dr. Ben Carson, secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development from 2017 to 2021, is the founder of the American Cornerstone Institute.

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Tags: Opinion, Beltway Confidential, Blog Contributors, Biden Administration, Pay Equity

Original Author: Ben Carson

Original Location: More spending won't reduce racial poverty divides

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usr: 2
This is interesting!