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Politics Would a return to 2018 really be the end of democracy?

16:45  25 november  2021
16:45  25 november  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

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New York Times columnist Charles Blow had a typical histrionic piece earlier this week accusing Republicans of “passing regressive voting laws that will disenfranchise primarily voters of color” that threaten “our democracy.”

a person standing in front of a sign © Provided by Washington Examiner

If you read through the column, though, you might notice that Blow never identifies a single law that he believes will “disenfranchise” anyone.

A Politico article (also from this week) does a better job, identifying items such as Georgia’s new voter ID requirement and reducing the number of ballot drop boxes.

But according to Rep. James Clyburn of South Carolina, no Democrat has ever been against voter ID, so that portion of the law shouldn’t be a problem. And Georgia didn’t have any drop boxes before 2020. They were a “temporary” creation of the Georgia State Election Board adopted to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Getting rid of drop boxes (and the Georgia law only reduces them!) would only return Georgia to the status quo of 2018.

Biden's democracy summit must cast a wide, inclusive net

  Biden's democracy summit must cast a wide, inclusive net When it is all said and done, the Summit for Democracy may not define the destination to everyone’s satisfaction, but it can help put the global democracy movement back on the right track. It has the potential to be an important part of the journey.J. Brian Atwood is a visiting scholar at Brown University's Watson Institute. He was president of the National Democratic Institute from 1985 to 1993, and administrator of USAID from 1993 to 1999.

What’s so bad about returning to voting laws as they were pre-pandemic?

Everything, according to the Democratic activists Politico talked to.

“If there isn’t a way for us to repeat what happened in November 2020, we’re f***ed,” Nse Ufot, the CEO of the Stacey Abrams-founded New Georgia Project, says in the piece.

Like Blow’s column, Ufot’s prediction that the Democratic Party will collapse if the nation returns to pre-coronavirus voting laws seems a bit unreasonable.

And it turns out the vast majority of people agree.

Echelon Insights recently asked 1,000 registered voters:

To prevent the spread of the coronavirus at polling places, many states in 2020 adopted voting rules to encourage mail-in or early voting. Now that the pandemic has subsided, which approach would you prefer states take with their voting laws?

Forty-seven percent of registered voters, including 49% of independents, said states should return to pre-pandemic voting rules.

With extreme gerrymanders locking in, Biden needs to make democracy preservation job one

  With extreme gerrymanders locking in, Biden needs to make democracy preservation job one It’s time for political leaders to up their game in preserving democracy. © Greg Nash President Biden is seen during a billing signing ceremony for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday, November 15, 2021. On Monday, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, an intergovernmental organization that works to promote and advance electoral processes world-wide, issued the latest warning about the condition of democracy in the United States.

Just 41% of voters, including just 37% of independents, said states should make their pandemic voting rules permanent.

Separately, Echelon also found that 82% of voters support requiring identification to vote, 61% supported banning ballot harvesting, and 60% supported banning unsolicited vote-by-mail applications.

Blow, President Joe Biden, and Democratic activists such as Ufot and Abrams may talk as if democracy will end if Democrats don’t pass their favored election reform laws. But the reality is that the specific changes implemented by Republican states are entirely reasonable and supported by most of the public.

Tags: Opinion, Campaigns, Democratic Party, Voting, Media, Voter ID Laws, New York Times, Polls

Original Author: Conn Carroll

Original Location: Would a return to 2018 really be the end of democracy?

Antony Blinken Says U.S. Has Seen How 'Fragile Our Democracy Can Be' .
Blinken is on a three-nation visit to Africa with a focus on easing conflicts, including the ongoing civil war in Ethiopia.Blinken was speaking at a meeting of civil society leaders in Kenya on Wednesday ahead of his meeting with the country's president, Uhuru Kenyatta. He is the most senior Biden administration official to visit Africa so far.

usr: 1
This is interesting!