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Politics Democrats are gambling on a Christmas rush to pass Biden's economic agenda, keep the government from shutting down, and continue paying the country's bills to avoid economic catastrophe

18:50  29 november  2021
18:50  29 november  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

At least 20 people injured after SUV slammed into Wisconsin Christmas parade, authorities say

  At least 20 people injured after SUV slammed into Wisconsin Christmas parade, authorities say An SUV sped into a Christmas parade in the Milwaukee suburb of Waukesha, leaving at least 20 people injured, authorities said Sunday. Your browser does not support this video Police in Waukesha, located about 20 miles west of Milwaukee, were urging people to avoid the downtown area. Mayor Shawn Reilly told WITI in Milwaukee that he does not believe there is any current danger to the public. Videos posted to social media, including a live feed of the parade operated by the City of Waukesha, show a red SUV breaking through barriers and speeding into the roadway where the parade was taking place.

U.S. President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi leave a meeting with House Democrats at the U.S. Capitol on Capitol Hill October 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images © Provided by Business Insider U.S. President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi leave a meeting with House Democrats at the U.S. Capitol on Capitol Hill October 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images
  • Congress has a lot on its plate this month.
  • Democrats want to avoid a government default on its debt and pass Biden's Build Back Better agenda.
  • A bipartisan effort to authorize defense spending is also on the table to pass before the new year.

Congress is back in session after a Thanksgiving recess, and lawmakers have a hefty agenda on their plates to complete before Christmas.

Two weeks ago, the House passed President Joe Biden's Build Back Better framework, and while that was a significant step toward advancing Democrats' social-spending agenda, they still have a ways to go. Not only does that framework face the Senate now, where it will likely see additional cuts and amendments, but Democrats also have to deal with averting a government shutdown, raising the debt ceiling, and passing a defense spending bill — all of which they hope to accomplish in December.

Joy turns to horror as SUV speeds into Christmas parade

  Joy turns to horror as SUV speeds into Christmas parade WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — A joyous scene of marching bands and children dancing in Santa hats and waving pompoms turned deadly in an instant, as an SUV sped through a barricade and into a Christmas parade in suburban Milwaukee while spectators watched in horror. One video showed a woman screaming, “Oh my God!” repeatedly as a group of young dancers was struck Sunday. A father talked of going “from one crumpled body to the other” in search of his daughter. Members of a “Dancing Grannies” club were among those hit. © Provided by Associated Press A police officer uses a flashlight while looking for evidence in downtown Waukesha, Wis.

"As you know, the legislative agenda for the remainder of 2021 is considerable," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer told lawmakers in a letter before Thanksgiving. "I am confident we can get each of these important items done this year, but it will likely take some long nights and weekends," he added.

Raise the debt ceiling by Dec. 5 to keep the US funded and avoid a government shutdown

The first matter Democrats must tackle is avoiding a government shutdown. On October 6, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell stepped in to help Democrats raise the debt ceiling and keep the government funded an additional two months. That measure expires in just five days, on December 5, meaning Democrats must figure out a way to once again ensure the US can continue paying its bills.

Bidens open holidays with Christmas tree and 'friendsgiving'

  Bidens open holidays with Christmas tree and 'friendsgiving' WASHINGTON (AP) — Jill Biden opened the holiday season at the White House on Monday by breaking off a sprig from the official Blue Room tree and giving it - and a big smooch — to her toddler grandson. “Look how beautiful this is,” the first lady said of the 18 1/2-foot (5.6 meter) Fraser fir that was delivered to her Pennsylvania Avenue doorstep by Clydesdale horses named Ben and Winston, who pulled a wagon carrying the tree. “It is beautiful. It's magnificent, really,” she said.

Although in the months leading up to October, Democrats struggled to raise the debt ceiling given the GOP stance that Democrats must do it on their own without Republican assistance, Insider reported last week that this time around may not quite the political standoff. McConnell and Schumer met to discuss the quickly approaching deadline.

"We had a good discussion about several different issues that are all extant here as we move toward the end of the session and we agreed to keep talking and working together to try to get somewhere," McConnell told HuffPost following the meeting.

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said that after December 15, she is not confident the Treasury will have the resources to fund the government and stressed the need for the matter to be addressed in a bipartisan way. Democrats like Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar agree.

"You know, if the Republicans want to scrooge out on us, and increase people's interest rates and make it hard to make car payments — go ahead, make that case," Klobuchar told ABC News. "We're going to stop them from doing that."

Bidens open holidays with Christmas tree and 'friendsgiving'

  Bidens open holidays with Christmas tree and 'friendsgiving' WASHINGTON (AP) — Jill Biden opened the holiday season at the White House by breaking off a sprig from the official Blue Room tree and giving it — and a big smooch — to her toddler grandson. “Look how beautiful this is,” the first lady said of the 18 1/2-foot (5.6 meter) Fraser fir that was delivered by wagon to her Pennsylvania Avenue doorstep by Clydesdale horses named Ben and Winston. “It is beautiful. It's magnificent, really,” she said Monday.The first lady later joined President Joe Biden for a visit to the Army’s Fort Bragg in North Carolina to celebrate “friendsgiving” with service members and military families.

Democrats' sweeping climate and social-welfare package

The vast majority of Democrats have been very clear: Americans need Biden's Build Back Better agenda signed into law as soon as possible. While the House succeeded in a passing a $2 trillion framework this month, their version is certainly not final as it now rests in the Senate.

As Insider's Joseph Zeballos-Roig reported, there are a number of measures that could get cut from the bill due to opposition from centrist Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema. For example, Manchin had concerns with the inclusion of four weeks of paid leave, arguing it could grow the national debt, and he has also pushed back against expanding Medicare.

Meanwhile, progressive Sen. Bernie Sanders would like to see the bill "strengthened." After the House passed the bill, he called for the inclusion of lower prescription drug prices, increased taxes on the wealthy, and more robust climate reform.

Biden previously said he would like to sign this bill into law "as soon as possible."

A bipartisan task: authorizing key defense programs

Both Republican and Democratic lawmakers are hoping to finalize the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for fiscal year 2022, which will likely be the easiest thing lawmakers can pass this month. The NDAA has historically been bipartisan, and as The Washington Post reported, lawmakers are hoping to pass the $768 billion annual measure this week.

However, this measure is being considered far later than it had in previous years and has raised concerns for some lawmakers that Congress could break a 60-year streak and fail to pass the defense policy bill.

"Don't mess up the one thing that you can count on the Senate to do in a bipartisan way every year," Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine told Politico. "A Senate that cannot do this hardly deserves the title."

Read the original article on Business Insider

Democrats fume that McConnell wants to block Biden's agenda so badly he's even holding up new defense spending: 'You can never say there's a bottom and they won't go lower' .
Democrats want to raise the debt ceiling, avoid a government shutdown, and pass Biden's agenda all before Christmas. The GOP has other plans.Democrats have an ambitious agenda for the upcoming month. They want to pass a resolution to avoid a government shutdown, raise the debt ceiling, and pass President Joe Biden's sweeping climate and social-welfare package, all before Christmas. But before any of that gets done, Republicans and Democrats need to work together to pass the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for fiscal year 2022 — a $768 billion annual measure that has been passed on a bipartisan basis every year for 60 years.

usr: 1
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