•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Judges Suggest Trump's Executive Privilege Claim May Upset WH's Relationship With Congress

23:06  30 november  2021
23:06  30 november  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Trump tells former aide Navarro to 'protect executive privilege' in House COVID-19 probe

  Trump tells former aide Navarro to 'protect executive privilege' in House COVID-19 probe Former President Trump said Saturday in a statement that he is telling former aide Peter Navarro to "protect executive privilege" amid a House probe into the federal government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic."The Communist Democrats are engaging in yet another Witch Hunt, this time going after my Administration's unprecedented and incredible coronavirus response, despite the fact that, sadly, more Americans have died this year from COVID than in all of 2020," Trump said in a statement shared through his spokesperson, Liz Harrington.

A three-judge panel warned that granting former President Donald Trump's request to invoke executive privilege after leaving office could disrupt relations between future sitting presidents and Congress. Trump speaks to supporters during a rally at the Iowa State Fairgrounds on October 09, 2021 in Des Moines, Iowa. © Scott Olson/Getty A three-judge panel warned that granting former President Donald Trump's request to invoke executive privilege after leaving office could disrupt relations between future sitting presidents and Congress. Trump speaks to supporters during a rally at the Iowa State Fairgrounds on October 09, 2021 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Three federal appellate judges seemed skeptical of allowing former President Donald Trump to invoke executive privilege in the investigation by the January 6 committee, suggesting this week that granting such power could disrupt the relationship between a sitting president and Congress.

3000 judges denounce working conditions in an

 3000 judges denounce working conditions in an forum © WEST FRANCE "We do not want a justice who does not listen, who reasons only in figures, all stopwatch and records everything," the authors write the tribune. Three thousand magistrates signed a text in which they denounce the lack of resources and suffering felt in the courts. Despite an increased budget, they do not want a justice who "stopwatch and records everything." The malaise is deep.

"We only have one president at a time under our Constitution," Patricia Millett, one of the three judges on the panel, said on Tuesday. "That incumbent president... has made the judgment and is best positioned, as the Supreme Court has told us, to make that call as to the interests of the executive branch."

"This all boils down to who decides," Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson added. "Who decides when it is in the best interest of the United States to disclose presidential records? Is it the current occupant of the White House or the former?"

Trump's attorneys argued in front of the D.C. Circuit panel for three hours on Tuesday morning as they attempted to prove that the former president should be permitted to keep conversations and records of his administration confidential from Congressional investigators probing the January 6 Capitol attack.

Ryan Leaf reflects on privilege, skewers high school coach on 'Bust' podcast about his life

  Ryan Leaf reflects on privilege, skewers high school coach on 'Bust' podcast about his life "Bust: The Ryan Leaf Story" is a podcast that fills in Leaf's well-chronicled story with anecdotes, insights and one brutal character assessment. In the first two episodes, available online, Leaf says the following:From NFL plays to college sports scores, all the top sports news you need to know every day. His former high school football coach was the most giant jerk you can imagine. Black football players at Washington State got kicked off the team for the same behavior Leaf committed without consequences.

But the three judges, who were randomly selected but also happened to all be appointed by Democrats, cautioned that granting the executive privilege claim could undercut decisions of a sitting president, like Joe Biden, who has agreed that it would be in the national interest to release the documents in question.

With little precedent for a case like this, judges raised countless hypotheticals during the oral arguments, asking questions like what would happen if a former president is repeatedly given priority over an incumbent president and whether a sitting president could access previous negotiations between his predecessor and a foreign government to help inform future decisions.

Millett also raised concern about how quickly Trump's requests have come in the months leaving the Oval Office and probed Trump's legal team for being unable to provide specifics on why certain documents should be withheld.

Trump effort to stymie Jan. 6 committee faces appeals court reckoning

  Trump effort to stymie Jan. 6 committee faces appeals court reckoning The former president’s lawsuit to shield his White House records faces a crucial review Tuesday.D.C. Circuit Judges Ketanji Brown Jackson, Patricia Millett and Robert Wilkins are wading into a dispute over Trump’s lawsuit against the Jan. 6 select committee and the National Archives, the custodian of his White House records. House investigators are attempting to obtain a voluminous batch of documents concerning Trump’s meetings, call records and decisions in the weeks preceding the riot — documents they say are essential both to understanding how Trump tried to subvert the 2020 election and to preventing new threats to the transfer of power.

"What arguments have you or your client made that say an individual document, this one really cannot be disclosed because it's about 'X?" Millett asked Trump attorney Justin Clark.

To date, Trump has made at least four assertions of executive privilege since leaving office and has tried to block the release of more than 700 sensitive pages.

The National Archives was set to begin handing over documents this month, but the release has been blocked by the Trump lawsuit.

Judge Tanya Chutkan of the D.C. District Court previously rejected Trump's efforts, writing in her opinion that executive privilege "exists for the benefit of the republic, not any individual."

Clark stressed that the high-profile case is on a tight 30-day timeline and added that his team would like time to pursue a challenge should they lose to the government.

The judges noted the time-sensitive nature of the case and promised to fast-track it but stopped short of saying when a ruling could be expected.

As the suit continues to make its way through court, Trump's allies have also attempted to cite executive privilege in their refusal to comply with the January 6 committee's subpoenas.

Mark Meadows cooperating with January 6 investigators

  Mark Meadows cooperating with January 6 investigators Donald Trump's former chief of staff Mark Meadows is cooperating with the House select committee investigating the January 6 riot and is providing records and agreeing to appear for an initial interview, CNN first reported Tuesday. © Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images/FILE WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 21: White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows talks to reporters at the White House on October 21, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) The move represents a critical shift in the relationship between the top Trump ally and the panel, and staving off a criminal contempt referral for now. "Mr.

Former Trump advisor Steve Bannon, who was not serving under the administration at the time of the insurrection, is currently awaiting trial for a misdemeanor criminal contempt charge. The House panel is also set to recommend that former Justice Department official Jeffrey Clark be held in contempt of Congress.

A similar fate had been expected for former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, but Meadows staved off a referral on Tuesday after it was announced he agreed to testify and provide documents to the House committee.

Related Articles

  • Meadows to Testify Before Jan. 6 Committee as Other Trump Allies Cite Executive Privilege
  • Ex-DOJ Official Jeffrey Clark in Jan. 6 Committee's Crosshairs as Contempt Vote Date Set
  • Steve Bannon Faces Over 1,000 Pages of Evidence and Materials From Prosecution in Contempt Case

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Jeffrey Clark's Deposition With Jan. 6 Committee Postponed Because of Health Condition .
The panel had previously voted Wednesday to push charging Clark with contempt, but said it would wait until a full House vote and allow him another chance. Before the committee voted for the contempt, Clark's lawyer told them that his client wished to invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. This was after Clark refused to answer questions regarding Trump's claim of executive privilege and other rights his lawyer said he should be allowed. Democratic Rep.

usr: 4
This is interesting!