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Politics Bump stock ban remains intact after appeals court deadlocks

23:49  03 december  2021
23:49  03 december  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Teacher Fired for Being in Same-Sex Marriage Can Sue Archdiocese, Appeals Court Rules

  Teacher Fired for Being in Same-Sex Marriage Can Sue Archdiocese, Appeals Court Rules A man fired in 2019 from an Indiana Catholic school for being in a same sex marriage is able to continue his lawsuit against the archdiocese that fired him.The ruling among a panel of the Indiana Court of Appeals was unanimous and reverses the decision of a Marion County court that dismissed Joshua Payne-Elliott's suit against the Archdiocese of Indianapolis.

A tie vote by a federal appeals court Friday left intact a Trump-era ban on "bump stock" devices that modify semi-automatic rifles to fire more rapidly.

Bump stock ban remains intact after appeals court deadlocks © The Hill Bump stock ban remains intact after appeals court deadlocks

The 8-8 vote by the Cincinnati-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit affirmed the ruling of a lower court judge who upheld the federal ban in 2019.

The Trump administration outlawed the devices after a gunman in Las Vegas in 2017 used the rapid-fire accessory to kill 58 people and wound hundreds in the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.

The court sided with the administration's argument that the ban falls within the scope of authority Congress gave federal agencies to regulate machine guns.

It was not clear if the challengers, led by the group Gun Owners of America, would seek relief in the Supreme Court and their lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Supreme Court last year declined to take up a separate legal effort by gun rights advocates to overturn the bump stock ban.

Overnight Health Care — Presented by AstraZeneca and Friends of Cancer Research — Court leaves Texas abortion ban, allows suits .
Welcome to Friday's Overnight Health Care, where we're following the latest moves on policy and news affecting your health. Subscribe here: thehill.com/newsletter-signup.The U.S. and much of the world was unprepared for how bad the coronavirus pandemic was. The next one could be worse, and nations don't seem to be learning their lessons. The Supreme Court let the Texas abortion law stay in place, at least temporarily, in a move that has abortion rights advocates pessimistic about the future. But SCOTUS also gave abortion providers the right to file lawsuits challenging the law. For The Hill, we're Peter Sullivan (psullivan@thehill.

usr: 1
This is interesting!