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Politics Chuck Schumer Plans to Show Joe Manchin, Kyrsten Sinema Why to Change Filibuster Rules

05:52  13 january  2022
05:52  13 january  2022 Source:   newsweek.com

Schumer: Senate to vote on filibuster change on voting bill

  Schumer: Senate to vote on filibuster change on voting bill WASHINGTON (AP) — Days before the anniversary of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced the Senate will vote soon on easing filibuster rules in an effort to advance stalled voting legislation that Democrats say is needed to protect America's democracy. In a letter Monday to colleagues, Schumer, D-N.Y., said the Senate “must evolve” and will “debate and consider” the rule changes by Jan. 17, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, as the Democrats seek to overcome Republican opposition to their elections law package.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Monday that the chamber will take a vote on whether to change the Senate's legislative filibuster rules by Martin Luther King Jr. The vote has a very slim chance of succeeding as two Democratic senators -- Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona -- have expressed strong opposition to changing the rules along party lines, a process known as the "nuclear option." "Over the coming weeks, the Senate will once again consider how to perfect this union and confront the historic challenges facing our democracy

Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) are opposed to it. "I don’t want to delude your listeners: This is an uphill fight, because Manchin and Sinema both do not believe in changing the rules ," Schumer admitted during a Center for American Progress event on Tuesday evening As The Hill notes, Democrats are warning that midterms could be a bloodbath in key states unless they change the filibuster , 'voting rights' (anti-election integrity), and other election reform legislation. This argument has apparently been made to Macnhin and Sinema , as colleagues attempt to sway the two moderate

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has outlined his plans to advance voting rights legislation, possibly setting up a showdown over the chamber's filibuster.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a memorial service for former Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday. The same day he laid out his plans to bring up voting rights legislation that could set up a change to the Senate filibuster. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a memorial service for former Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday. The same day he laid out his plans to bring up voting rights legislation that could set up a change to the Senate filibuster.

A memo sent by Schumer to Senate Democrats Wednesday lays out how he plans to sidestep procedures that have been used by Republicans to block consideration of voting rights legislation. The Senate requires 60 votes to initiate debate on most bills, which has been a stumbling block for Democrats as they've sought to advance voting rights legislation in the evenly divided chamber.

MLK III says 'history will remember Sen. Sinema unkindly' after she rejects filibuster change

  MLK III says 'history will remember Sen. Sinema unkindly' after she rejects filibuster change Martin Luther King III reacted to Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's (D-Ariz.) Thursday announcement that she will not support a change to the Senate filibuster, writing in a statement that history will remember the Arizona Democrat "unkindly.""History will remember Senator Sinema unkindly. While Sen. Sinema remains stubborn in her 'optimism,' Black and Brown Americans are losing their right to vote," King III wrote in a statement shortly after Sinema's"History will remember Senator Sinema unkindly. While Sen. Sinema remains stubborn in her 'optimism,' Black and Brown Americans are losing their right to vote," King III wrote in a statement shortly after Sinema's floor speech regarding the filibuster.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) will use a series of votes next week to show Democratic holdouts that the filibuster must go. Most immediately, he promised a vote before the end of June on a sweeping voting rights bill that Democrats say is needed to counter new Republican-led voting restrictions being enacted in states around the nation. The idea is to show Democrats refusing to change the filibuster rules that Republicans led by Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the minority leader, are going to stand in the way of legislation that has widespread

It’s a 50-50 Senate, Chuck . And now you want to nuke the filibuster rules . There is a huge problem with this—and it’s one you’ve known for months. You face two massive obstacles that have already subjected this little stunt to doom. The vote has a very slim chance of succeeding as two Democratic senators -- Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona -- have expressed strong opposition to changing the rules along party lines, a process known as the "nuclear option." "Over the coming weeks, the Senate will once again consider how to perfect this union and confront the historic

Schumer plans to get around the 60-vote requirement by considering the legislation as a "message," according to the memo, obtained by The Hill. Although the bill will still need to clear the 60-vote threshold before it can pass, Schumer said the maneuver will at least overcome the GOP's lockstep opposition and allow the Senate to begin debate. Schumer's office did not respond to a request for comment from Newsweek Wednesday evening.

"With this procedure, we will finally have an opportunity to debate voting rights legislation – something that Republicans have thus far denied," Schumer said in the memo.

Democrats have been seeking to pass two bills: the John Lewis Voting Rights Act and the Freedom to Vote Act, of which proponents say are needed to counter restrictive measures passed or being considered by GOP-led legislatures following the 2020 election.

As voting rights push fizzles, Biden's failure to unite his own party looms again

  As voting rights push fizzles, Biden's failure to unite his own party looms again Sens. Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin, both Democrats, said Thursday they were against filibuster changes, spoiling Biden's efforts to pass voting rights.On Thursday, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, an Arizona Democrat, dealt a potentially fatal blow to Biden’s renewed push for federal voting rights legislation. In a surprise speech on the Senate floor, she flatly rejected Biden’s plea – issued less than 48 hours earlier – to change the filibuster rules so Democrats could muscle through the voting rights bill without any Republican votes.

President Joe Biden speaks outside the White House with a bipartisan group of senators, including Kyrsten Sinema (center bottom) and Joe Manchin (center top), after meeting on an infrastructure deal on June 24. Win McNamee/Getty Images. But genres change . Horror these days is different: It consists of (for example) watching people—specifically, Democratic politicians—march knowingly, slowly, and fully informed of what awaits them and their voters, into civic annihilation.

Photos GettySenator Kyrsten Sinema is confused. At a private caucus meeting last week, she pointedly asked Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer why Democrats can’t overcome Republican opposition to the major ethics and voting rights reforms that Joe Biden promised voters, and that over 60 But Sinema wasn’t talking about the For the People Act that Schumer hopes to squeak through. She was referring to her own competing legislation.Not to be outdone, last week Senator Joe Manchin announced his own plan to address the GOP’s nationwide war on voting rights, a not-so-subtle way

However, Democratic Senators Joe Manchin, of West Virginia, and Kyrsten Sinema, of Arizona, have opposed changing the filibuster, warning their fellow Democrats they could regret the move if and when Republicans retake the chamber.

Schumer said in the memo that starting a floor debate "sets up a process in which Senators can finally make clear to the American people where they stand on protecting our democracy and preserving the right of every eligible American to cast a ballot," according to The Washington Post.

During an appearance on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Schumer said he still hadn't won over the two moderates. But he added that "this is too important to concede," and that other Senate Democrats have continued to press the holdouts, arguing the country's democracy is at stake.

"Do I want to delude people? Do I want people to think we're almost there? No. It's an uphill fight," he said.

Schumer vows to push forward with filibuster change: 'The fight is not over'

  Schumer vows to push forward with filibuster change: 'The fight is not over' Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Monday vowed to move forward with a likely doomed effort to change Senate filibuster rules as part of an effort to pass voting rights legislation.Schumer - speaking at a National Action Network event with Al Sharpton, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and others - acknowledged that the bid to change the legislative filibuster is a "tough fight" but said he and other Democrats would push ahead. The Democratic leader's remarks come after Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) reiterated last week that they don't support changing the Senate rule, which requires 60 votes for most bills to advance.

Kyrsten Sinema . United States Senator from Arizona. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) promises a final push to pass voting rights legislation that could include changing the chamber's filibuster rules . (Photo: Anna Moneymaker via Getty Images). The Senate’s fight to pass voting rights legislation Manchin is in “active conversation” with a small group of moderate Democrats about what changes to filibuster rules he could support, according to a senior Democratic source with knowledge of the negotiations. The negotiations with Manchin are being led by Sens. Angus King (I-Maine), Jon

Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) doubled down Tuesday on his support for the filibuster as President Biden heads to Georgia to publicly push for changes to the Senate rule in order to pass voting rights legislation."We need some good rules changes to make the place work better. Prime Minister Boris Johnson apologized Wednesday for attending a garden party during Britain’s first coronavirus lockdown, but brushed aside demands that he resign for breaching the rules his own government had imposed on the nation.

Manchin's office did not respond to a request for comment from Newsweek Wednesday evening.

Sinema's office responded with an email reiterating her "strong support" for both pieces of voting rights legislation. But Sinema again raised concerns that removing the filibuster could mean a future GOP-controlled Senate could easily enact voting restrictions.

The GOP's lockstep opposition has renewed calls to rework or end the filibuster. Notably, President Joe Biden said in a speech in Atlanta on Tuesday that the Senate should "stand against voter suppression" and end the filibuster.

Schumer has previously said the Senate will debate rule changes by Jan. 17, Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

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  • Lindsey Graham Blasts Joe Biden's Voting Rights Bill As 'Manufactured BS'

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The Filibuster Is Still Doomed .
The question is who will benefit most when it finally falls.In the end, they did neither.

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