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Politics Biden says he's "not sure" about voting bills' future after Sinema reiterates opposition to rule change

01:11  14 january  2022
01:11  14 january  2022 Source:   cbsnews.com

As voting rights push fizzles, Biden's failure to unite his own party looms again

  As voting rights push fizzles, Biden's failure to unite his own party looms again Sens. Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin, both Democrats, said Thursday they were against filibuster changes, spoiling Biden's efforts to pass voting rights.On Thursday, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, an Arizona Democrat, dealt a potentially fatal blow to Biden’s renewed push for federal voting rights legislation. In a surprise speech on the Senate floor, she flatly rejected Biden’s plea – issued less than 48 hours earlier – to change the filibuster rules so Democrats could muscle through the voting rights bill without any Republican votes.

President Biden said Thursday that he is “ not sure ” whether Democrats will be successful in the passage of legislation to federally takeover elections. Who counts the vote … that' s what this is about." Biden also said that as "long as he has a breath" in him and as long as he remains president and is "engaged at all," he is going to be "fighting to change the way these legislatures have moved." Biden and other Democrats object strongly to laws passed by various states tightening election rules .

After his speech, Biden asked White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator Jeffrey Zients to open to the floor to questions from the governors. However, before taking any questions, Zients quickly booted the press from the room, saying : 'I think we're going to clear the press first.' ' Biden says there' s no federal solution to COVID and that this gets solved at a state level. He should immediately end his unconstitutional federal mandates,' Abbott argued. 'The Texas solution is no mandates and personal responsibility.'

President Biden met Thursday afternoon with Senate Democrats, saying "as long as I'm in the White House ... I'm going to be fighting for these bills," hours after Senator Kyrsten Sinema, one of two Senate Democrats known to oppose changes to Senate rules, said Thursday on the Senate floor that she will not change her position.

Her remarks come moments ahead of Mr. Biden's lunchtime meeting with Senate Democrats in which he encouraged lawmakers to overhaul Senate rules to allow the voting bills to pass with a simple majority, rather than 60 votes. Following that meeting, the president told reporters he hopes they can pass the legislation but he's "not certain" they can.

Manchin and Sinema Must Face 'Consequences' for Stalling Voting Rights, Democratic Rep Says

  Manchin and Sinema Must Face 'Consequences' for Stalling Voting Rights, Democratic Rep Says Representative Adriano Espaillat said "much must be done to push these two senators to line up and be in lock-step with our leadership."This week, Manchin and Sinema reiterated their support for the Senate filibuster—a rule that Biden and other Democrats want to change in order to pass voting rights bills—delivering a major setback for the president's agenda. The filibuster requires lawmakers in the Senate to reach a 60-vote threshold to advance legislation. The Democratic majority only holds 50 seats in the chamber.

He never meant it because he never fucking fought for it. No bias in that assessment. Makes perfect sense that Democrats don’t want to pass their only signature bill of this presidency! /s. + Unquestioning assertions of Doom and financial crashes coming soon, just in case anyone was taking you seriously Man gun is a southern democrat, which means he is a centrist. Without him in WV McConnell would control the Senate and Biden would not be passing any legislation. The fact that he ’ s not on board with a progressive agenda doesn’t mean he is t a Democrat, it just means he doesn’t see the world in the

But, he also added, he was hopeful Biden might put the country' s interests first. Several people who spoke to CNN Saturday used the word "disappointed," including a man outside the grocery store in Warrenton who declined to give his name. Not every Republican who spoke to CNN was so pessimistic. Trace Norstrom, a fourth grade teacher from Kenosha County, Wisconsin who voted for Trump, said he had doubts about the election' s integrity but hoped Biden would work to compromise with Republicans and unify the country as president.

"Like every other major civil rights bill that came along, if we missed the first time, we could come back and try it a second time. We missed this time. We missed this time," he said. "... I don't know that we can get it done, but I know one thing: As long as I have a breath in me, as long as I am in the White House, as long as I'm engaged at all, I'm gonna' be fighting to change the way these legislatures have moved."

Arizona's Sinema and West Virginia's Joe Manchin have repeatedly and openly expressed their opposition to such a change. National Democrats are trying to pass the Freedom to Vote Act, which would establish national election standards, and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would reinstate a core provision of the Voting Rights Act.

Analysis: Joe Biden puts it all on the line in voting rights battle

  Analysis: Joe Biden puts it all on the line in voting rights battle It took a year for Joe Biden to make an irrevocable bet that puts the credibility of his presidency on the line. If his bid now to change Senate rules to pass voting rights legislation fails, he'll lose more than just the bills he sees as vital to saving democracy. His drained political capital could spell the end of the entire domestic, legislative phase of his administration. © Patrick Semansky/AP President Joe Biden speaks in support of changing the Senate filibuster rules that have stalled voting rights legislation, at Atlanta University Center Consortium, on the grounds of Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, Tuesday, Jan.

A procedural vote on a House rule concerning the infrastructure and reconciliation bills , as well as the John Lewis Voting Rights Act, passed along party lines on August 24.[68] On September 7, the administration proposed a stopgap [114][115] National Economic Council Director Brian Deese clarified that the revised score is of a "hypothetical future bill " that Biden would not support,[112] and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen issued a memo to senators rebutting it as well as a Department of Labor report on the consumer price index indicating that inflation had reached its highest point in 40.

As it reads " Biden says he does not think that the sun is dark". Oh hey, this seems to line up with the actual context behind his “nothing will fundamentally change ” statement I’ve seen He ' s correct, of course, unless you ask thecswells whose insane bonuses are contingent upon the ridiculous amounts

Manchin and Sinema are heading to the White House for a meeting with Biden, CBS News has learned.

Sinema said she continues to support the legislation and emphasized the need to prohibit states from restricting voting access, but said such change cannot come at the cost of further division.

 U.S. President Joe Biden speaks to reporters after a meeting with Senate Democrats in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill on January 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.  / Credit: Drew Angerer / Getty Images © Provided by CBS News U.S. President Joe Biden speaks to reporters after a meeting with Senate Democrats in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill on January 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.  / Credit: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

"While I continue to support these bills, I will not support separate actions that worsen the underlying disease of division afflicting our country," Sinema said on the Senate floor. "There's no need for me to restate my longstanding support for the 60 vote threshold to pass legislation. And there's no need for me to restate its role protecting our country from wild reversals in federal policy."

Chuck Schumer Plans to Show Joe Manchin, Kyrsten Sinema Why to Change Filibuster Rules

  Chuck Schumer Plans to Show Joe Manchin, Kyrsten Sinema Why to Change Filibuster Rules The Senate's top Democrat has laid out his plan to bring voting rights legislation to the Senate floor, which could set up a vote on changing the filibuster.A memo sent by Schumer to Senate Democrats Wednesday lays out how he plans to sidestep procedures that have been used by Republicans to block consideration of voting rights legislation. The Senate requires 60 votes to initiate debate on most bills, which has been a stumbling block for Democrats as they've sought to advance voting rights legislation in the evenly divided chamber.

But he did not face Senate confirmation as the acting leader. “Mayor Pete Buttigieg was open and honest about his identity throughout his time on the national scene, giving a voice to our community, and a new vision of who and how our leaders can love,” said Alphonso David, the president of Becoming part of Mr. Biden ’ s cabinet will give Mr. Buttigieg a national perch from which to advance his future political career in the Democratic Party. It will also allow him to apply some of the experience with transit policy he gained during his mayorship to national challenges surrounding infrastructure

The opposition accused him of knowingly breaking his own lockdown rules when attending The prime minister’ s spokesman responded to the story, saying that “the prime minister held a With no opposition to the UK increasingly and blatantly, right-wing authoritarian, the UK is, effectively, a one-party state. Not sure about Truss or Sunak. They are also globalist? Pureblood • 51 minutes ago.

Eliminating the 60-rule vote on a party line "will not guarantee that we prevent demagogues from winning office," she said.

"Eliminating the 60-vote threshold will simply guarantee that we lose a critical tool that we need to safeguard our democracy from threats in the years to come," she added.

The senator from Arizona expressed frustration with both Republicans in blocking the voting legislation, and Democrats in trying to alter Senate rules.

Following the meeting, the president said he hopes they can pass the legislation, but isn't sure.

"I hope we can get this done," he told reporters. "But I'm not sure."

Manchin said the president gave a "wonderful speech," while Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Senate Democrats are "going to do everything we can to pass these two bills."

In a speech in Atlanta on Tuesday, the president said publicly for the first time that he supports nixing the filibuster for the voting bills.

"I've been having these quiet conversations with members of Congress for the last two months. I'm tired of being quiet!" the president exclaimed.

Analysis: Joe Biden and Democrats run up against relentless conservative power

  Analysis: Joe Biden and Democrats run up against relentless conservative power Democrats control Washington but President Joe Biden is staring at a wall of conservative power, accrued over years and wielded with a ruthlessness and zeal for rule-breaking that his own party has rarely matched. © Jose Luis Magana/AP President Joe Biden speaks to the media after meeting privately with Senate Democrats, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) The President's struggles to implement his strategy to protect US democracy and reshape the economy to help working Americans are hampered by divisions in his own party.

The House on Thursday, in a 220-203 vote, passed a consolidated voting bill that would be the first step in enabling the Senate to debate voting rights changes on the floor.

"Nothing less than our democracy is at stake," Pelosi said Wednesday.

Meanwhile, Republicans are warning the president and Senate Democrats against changing the Senate rules.

"This is more than just about one issue," said Republican Senator Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia. "This is about fundamentally changing the fabric, the fence that the Senate provides by having the filibuster in place to make sure that we don't have the dramatic swings from administration to administration, from majority to minority, [from] Republican to Democratic, and that we keep the ship sort of going in the right direction and working together at the same time."

White House press secretary Jen Psaki didn't say whether the White House has identified more executive actions the president can and plans to take, pointing out the president signed an executive order early on in his presidency to promote voting rights. Psaki acknowledged that it can be difficult to get things done with a small majority in the Senate.

"The president's view is we're going to keep pushing for hard things, and we're going to keep pushing the boulders up the hill to get it done," she said.

CBS News' Jack Turman, Fin Gomez and Adam Brewster contributed to this report.

Clyburn: Sinema 'not right' for backing filibuster in light of potential GOP majority .
House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) on Sunday said Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's (D-Ariz.) reasoning for defending the filibuster is "not right," after the Arizona Democrat said she wants to keep the legislative hurdle intact to protect a potential GOP majority from enacting sweeping change in the future.During an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union" co-anchor Jake Tapper asked Clyburn for his thoughts on Sinema's Thursday floor speech inDuring an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union" co-anchor Jake Tapper asked Clyburn for his thoughts on Sinema's Thursday floor speech in which the moderate senator reiterated her support for the 60-vote legislative filibuster, dealing a blow to Democrats and their

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This is interesting!