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Politics Senate Democrats call special caucus meeting ahead of filibuster fight

06:51  18 january  2022
06:51  18 january  2022 Source:   thehill.com

Analysis: Joe Biden puts it all on the line in voting rights battle

  Analysis: Joe Biden puts it all on the line in voting rights battle It took a year for Joe Biden to make an irrevocable bet that puts the credibility of his presidency on the line. If his bid now to change Senate rules to pass voting rights legislation fails, he'll lose more than just the bills he sees as vital to saving democracy. His drained political capital could spell the end of the entire domestic, legislative phase of his administration. © Patrick Semansky/AP President Joe Biden speaks in support of changing the Senate filibuster rules that have stalled voting rights legislation, at Atlanta University Center Consortium, on the grounds of Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, Tuesday, Jan.

Democrats in the Senate will try to pass on Tuesday voting rights legislation by breaking the Senate ’s centuries-old filibuster rule. Last week, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) announced that the chamber will vote on two voting rights bills, the Freedom to Vote Act and John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, on Tuesday. “Make no mistake, the United States Senate will — for the first time this Congress — debate voting rights legislation beginning on Tuesday. Members of this chamber were elected to debate and to vote, particularly on an issue as vital to the beating heart of our

Senate Democrats will force a vote on rolling back the filibuster rules in an effort to pass sweeping voting reform legislation in the coming days. While Republicans have balked at the brazen attempt to unravel the 60-vote threshold in the Senate , Democrats say the two voting rights bills at the center of the effort are so important to democracy they warrant upending long-standing Senate rules. "All of us in this chamber must make a choice about how we will do our part to preserve our democratic republic," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Tuesday. "We can’t be satisfied in

Senate Democrats are convening a special, in-person caucus meeting on Tuesday as they brace for a fight on voting rights and the filibuster to come to a head.

Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) speaks to reporters after hearing from President Biden at a Democratic caucus luncheon at the Senate Russell Office building to discuss voting rights and filibuster reform on Thursday, January 13, 2022. © Greg Nash Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) speaks to reporters after hearing from President Biden at a Democratic caucus luncheon at the Senate Russell Office building to discuss voting rights and filibuster reform on Thursday, January 13, 2022.

Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) has called the meeting for 5 p.m. on Tuesday, a source confirmed to The Hill. Unlike most of the caucus meetings in the wake of the rise of the omicron coronavirus variant, the meeting will be in person.

MLK III says 'history will remember Sen. Sinema unkindly' after she rejects filibuster change

  MLK III says 'history will remember Sen. Sinema unkindly' after she rejects filibuster change Martin Luther King III reacted to Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's (D-Ariz.) Thursday announcement that she will not support a change to the Senate filibuster, writing in a statement that history will remember the Arizona Democrat "unkindly.""History will remember Senator Sinema unkindly. While Sen. Sinema remains stubborn in her 'optimism,' Black and Brown Americans are losing their right to vote," King III wrote in a statement shortly after Sinema's"History will remember Senator Sinema unkindly. While Sen. Sinema remains stubborn in her 'optimism,' Black and Brown Americans are losing their right to vote," King III wrote in a statement shortly after Sinema's floor speech regarding the filibuster.

Progressive groups are ramping up pressure on Senate Democrats to nix the legislative filibuster ahead of a voting rights fight set to come to a head in a matter of weeks. To meet the urgency of the moment and scale of the threat, we call on the Senate to return to Washington as quickly as possible to address the filibuster and deliver the federal voting and democracy protections we need," the groups wrote in the letter, a copy of which was obtained by The Hill.

Democrats face growing pressure to nix the legislative filibuster as President Biden takes an increasingly hard line against the procedural roadblock that threatens to stall much of his agenda. Joe Manchin Joe Manchin On the Money — Democrats grow less confident in Manchin McConnell blocks simple majority votes on Dems' voting rights bills Republicans threaten floor takeover if Democrats weaken filibuster MORE (D-W.Va.) is in the middle of all the Senate ’s big debates, including whether to nix the filibuster .

The meeting comes as the Senate is expected to formally start debate on Tuesday on voting legislation that combines the Freedom to Vote Act, which would overhaul federal elections and campaign finance laws, and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which strengthens and expands the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

It will be the first in-person meeting for Senate Democrats since both Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) reiterated that they support keeping the 60-vote filibuster. Though Sinema reiterated her position before a caucus lunch with Biden, Manchin waited until after the meeting to release a statement.

Despite the setback, Schumer is signaling that he's vowing to push forward with his plan to force a voting rights debate. Democrats view the bills as must-pass as GOP-controlled states enact new voting rules in the wake of the 2020 election that former President Trump falsely claimed was "stolen."

Senate to take up voting rights bill Tuesday, missing Schumer deadline

  Senate to take up voting rights bill Tuesday, missing Schumer deadline Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced on Thursday night that the Senate will take up voting rights legislation on Tuesday, missing his self-imposed deadline to hold a vote on changing the filibuster by Monday, Jan. 17. The change in the Senate schedule comes after Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) announced he was isolating after testing positive for COVID-19 in a breakthrough case, leaving Democrats one vote short on their ability to start debate on the voting rights bill. Senators are also worried about the potential for another snowstorm in Washington, D.C., on Sunday into Monday. "I have a short announcement about the schedule.

filibuster , so Democrats need. 10 Republicans to join them. A bill needs the support of. The filibuster is not in the Constitution and is generally recognized as an accident of Senate rules. But few bills meet that criteria in today’s hyper-partisan political climate, especially with the Senate ’s Ahead of the Senate vote on whether to establish the Jan. 6 commission, CNN asked Manchin if he

Senate Democrats on Tuesday voted to raise the debt ceiling, bypassing a GOP filibuster as part of a deal struck by congressional leaders. “Every Senate Democrat is going to vote on party lines to raise our nation’s debt limit by trillions of dollars. If they jam through another reckless taxing and spending spree, this massive debt increase will be just the beginning,” he said. “More printing and borrowing to set up more reckless spending to cause more inflation to hurt working families even more,” McConnell added.

Democrats are using a procedural loophole to sidestep the need to break a filibuster to start debate on the bill. But they'll still need 60 votes to end debate on the bill, a vote that is expected to take place on Wednesday.


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Once Republicans block the voting bill, Schumer is signaling that he plans to move forward with forcing a vote on trying to change the Senate's rules.

"I'm going down to Washington, and we are going to debate voting rights. We are going to debate it, and, in the Senate, you know we need 60 votes to break a Republican filibuster ... but since we only have 50 Democrats in our razor-thin majority, the only path forward on this important issue is to change the rules to bypass the filibuster," Schumer said at an event earlier Monday.

He added, in reference to Sinema and Manchin, that "there are two Democrats who don't want to make that happen. But the fight is not over, far from it."

McConnell’s Threat to Go Nuclear on Democrats Is Nonsense

  McConnell’s Threat to Go Nuclear on Democrats Is Nonsense After President Joe Biden appealed to Senate Democrats this week to eliminate the filibuster, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell played a familiar card: If Democrats eliminate the filibuster now they will regret it when Republicans control the Senate later. McConnell’s threats of political retribution have long made Democrats uneasy, and the looming specter of legislative payback is central to the arguments of Democratic centrist senators in favor of preserving the 60-vote threshold. But McConnell’s threats of political payback shouldn’t even register in Democrats’ minds as a reason to keep the filibuster around. In fact, they are largely empty.

Top Democrats say the filibuster fight will soon come to a head with the debate over creating the independent commission and a commitment by Mr. Schumer to hold a vote on the sweeping voting rights legislation before August. Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the minority leader, and nearly every other Senate Republican adamantly oppose both, and they seem destined for filibusters that will rekindle the calls to eliminate the tactic. “We hope to move forward with Republicans,” Mr. Schumer told reporters on Tuesday, “but we’re not going to let them saying no stand in our way.”

Republicans filibustered the Jan 6th investigation panel, they would filibuster any meaningful social legislation and they are now threatening to filibuster A CLEAN DEBT CEILING BILL THE RESULT OF WHICH WOULD CAUSE THE US TO DEFAULT just to spite democrats and make them use a reconciliation bill to do it. The generation of people in power have failed us consistently for the past 20 years. They have lived off their grand parents accomplishments for too long. It’s time to meet this pivotal moment head on or get the fuck out the way.

But the attempt to change the filibuster appears doomed given opposition from Manchin and Sinema.

In order to change the rules without GOP support, Schumer needs total unity from all 50 members of his caucus. That would require him to meet the unlikely hurdle of being able to win over Manchin and Sinema at the 11th hour, with neither of them appearing to move on the rules debate.

The meeting comes as Schumer hasn't yet said how Democrats will propose to change the rules.

They have floated implementing a talking filibuster that would allow opponents to delay a bill for as long as they can hold the floor, but after that, it would be able to pass by a simple majority. They are also discussing creating a carveout that would exempt voting rights legislation from the 60-vote hurdle but leave it in place for other issues.

Democrats have had enough of Sen. Kyrsten Sinema’s obstruction .
Sinema’s political future is murky after her filibuster vote.Sinema, along with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV), spurned a Democratic effort to restore the talking filibuster for voting rights legislation in order to pass the Freedom To Vote and John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement acts, and the effort ultimately failed by a vote of 48 to 52 on Wednesday.

usr: 0
This is interesting!