•   
  •   
  •   

Politics The 'America's tired' proposition tests GOP in upcoming primaries: The Note

14:01  01 august  2022
14:01  01 august  2022 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Senate Democrats want to tax hedge funders by closing a loophole while Republicans cling to the hope that Sinema will object

  Senate Democrats want to tax hedge funders by closing a loophole while Republicans cling to the hope that Sinema will object Democrats are suddenly tiptoeing closer to a deal on Biden's economic agenda, but closing the carried interest loophole could be a sticking point."This Senate Democratic majority will ensure the wealthiest corporations and individuals pay a fairer share in taxes," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Thursday at the US Capitol while debriefing congressional reporters about the state of play of the stunning deal he and centrist Democrat Sen. Joe Mahchin of West Virginia sprung on everyone late July 27.

The TAKE with Rick Klein

Arizona House Speaker Rusty Bowers used a memorable phrase to tell ABC's Jonathan Karl why he doesn't think he or other Republicans will have to agonize over whether to support former President Donald Trump again in 2024: "America's tired."

Long before then, Bowers has to worry about his own GOP primary on Tuesday against a Trump-backed opponent -- making him the first Jan. 6 committee witness to face voters this year. Also on the ballot Tuesday are three of the 10 House Republicans to vote to impeach Trump after last year's Capitol riot, in addition to top-of-the-ticket proxy wars in battlegrounds including Arizona and Michigan.

The best Chinese films and TV shows to watch with family

  The best Chinese films and TV shows to watch with family The best Chinese films and TV shows to watch with family

In a sense, a whole crop of Republicans running in midsummer primaries are testing Bowers' theory about Republican voters. While Rep. Liz Cheney's Aug. 16 primary in Wyoming may get more attention, other Republicans who are standing or have stood against Trump with less national attention may provide truer test cases of what's to come for their party.

In the case of impeachment-backing members of Congress, the only one to advance to a general election so far is Rep. David Valadao, who avoided a head-to-head matchup with a MAGA Republican because of California's all-party primary system.

The two House members from Washington running Tuesday could benefit from a similar system, which encourages cross-party voting. Perhaps less fortunate is Rep. Peter Meijer, R-Mich., who also has to contend with Democrats' risky effort to focus on his Trump-aligned opponent in Tuesday's primary voting.

White House mum on Democrats boosting 'ultra-MAGA' candidates in GOP primaries

  White House mum on Democrats boosting 'ultra-MAGA' candidates in GOP primaries The White House did not respond directly when asked about Democrats supporting candidates who question the 2020 election results in Republican primaries in hopes of securing victories in the general election, a strategy that operatives have described as risky. Throughout the midterm elections, some Democratic operatives have been engaging in a spoiler strategy to prop up candidates perceived as being fringe in GOP primary contests to attempt to make general elections more winnable for Democratic candidates, which White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre was asked about Tuesday.

Democrats aside, Meijer, Bowers, Cheney and others are facing the outsized presence of Trump himself as he continues a revenge mission that labels them "RINOs" and worse. Ultimately their political fates will fall to those who call themselves Republicans, regardless of what Trump calls them.

Rusty Bowers appears for testimony during the fourth hearing on the January 6th investigation in Washington, June 21, 2022. © Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images, FILE Rusty Bowers appears for testimony during the fourth hearing on the January 6th investigation in Washington, June 21, 2022.

The RUNDOWN with Averi Harper

Another positive COVID-19 test has landed President Joe Biden back in isolation.

"Folks, today I tested positive for COVID again. This happens with a small minority of folks. I've got no symptoms but I am going to isolate for the safety of everyone around me," Biden tweeted Saturday. "I'm still at work and will be back on the road soon."

His announcement comes as Senate Democrats move toward a vote on legislation that aims to tackle climate change, decrease health care costs, change the tax code and lower the deficit -- goals central to Biden's agenda.

Here are the GOP candidates Democrats have helped in primaries

  Here are the GOP candidates Democrats have helped in primaries Democratic-aligned groups and candidates have spent tens of millions of dollars to influence GOP primaries across the country this year, hoping that their efforts will yield less-electable, more-controversial Republican nominees in the general elections. And while those efforts appear to be paying off in some states, they’ve also stirred concern among some Democrats that these…And while those efforts appear to be paying off in some states, they’ve also stirred concern among some Democrats that these tactics run the risk of helping elect far-right candidates to high-level public offices, especially in a political environment that is largely working against Democrats.

Biden, who has been sure to emphasize via social media that he is working through his rebound case of COVID-19, could still be holed up in the White House if the legislation passes. His doctor said Sunday that he continues to test positive but has been "feeling well."

Biden was slated to travel to Michigan to celebrate the passage of the $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act, a boon to semiconductor production and manufacturing jobs. Those plans are now canceled -- with sickness sidelining the president again as the White House had planned a victory lap of sorts. The virus could still cause problems for Democrats in the Senate, too: The upper chamber has no proxy voting -- so they'll have to all stay healthy to get the latest reconciliation package done.

President Joe Biden listens during a meeting with CEOs in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex in Washington, July 28, 2022. © Susan Walsh/AP President Joe Biden listens during a meeting with CEOs in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex in Washington, July 28, 2022.

The TIP with Alisa Wiersema

Trump's backing of gubernatorial Republican candidate Tudor Dixon on Friday was the latest of nearly two dozen Michigan-based endorsements he's made up and down the ballot. With endorsements spanning statewide, federal and local elections, Trump appears to be focusing on Michigan more than any other 2020 battleground.

Five questions about House primaries in five states

  Five questions about House primaries in five states While there are many uncertainties, one sure thing about Tuesday’s primaries in five states is that at least one House incumbent will lose the chance to be in the next Congress. That’s because Democratic voters in one Michigan district have to choose between two incumbents. But other sitting House members are also in jeopardy on […] The post Five questions about House primaries in five states appeared first on Roll Call.

Half of the recommendations Trump has issued in Michigan so far favor challengers for state legislative seats who he says dispute the outcome of the 2020 election (though there is no evidence for their allegations). His picks for state attorney general and secretary of state -- two executive-level positions that would be involved in the verification of future election results -- are also proponents of false claims of 2020 election fraud.

Taken together, Tuesday's down-ballot contests will not only confirm Trump's influence -- or lack thereof -- in a battleground state he lost by just over 154,000 votes, but also the races may leave a larger footprint on Michigan's election administration process for potentially years to come.

In an interview with Fox News Sunday, Dixon sidestepped saying whether she thought the 2020 election was stolen and instead blamed Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson.

"It was obviously a different election. We had COVID going on. There was the opportunity for changes to be made. This secretary of state made those changes, sending out absentee ballot applications to everyone in the state," Dixon said.

Dixon also pushed back on criticism from Republicans who say her ties to Trump's former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos -- who resigned from his administration amid Jan. 6 fallout -- indicate that she is not conservative enough to be a candidate for the party.

Gov. Larry Hogan said if Trump announces a 2024 run before the midterms GOP governors worry it will 'cost us seats'

  Gov. Larry Hogan said if Trump announces a 2024 run before the midterms GOP governors worry it will 'cost us seats' Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said "it's going to cost us seats" if Trump announces a run, adding: "After all, he lost to Joe Biden, which is hard to do.""We had discussions about that at the Republican Governors Association last week," Hogan said during an interview with ABC's "This Week" on Sunday.

"The secretary knows that she and I differ on that subject," Dixon said when asked if she agreed with DeVos about Trump's involvement in Jan. 6.

Republican candidate for governor Tudor Dixon, of Norton Shores, appears at a debate in Grand Rapids, Mich., July 6, 2022. © Michael Buck/AP, FILE Republican candidate for governor Tudor Dixon, of Norton Shores, appears at a debate in Grand Rapids, Mich., July 6, 2022.

NUMBER OF THE DAY, powered by FiveThirtyEight

12. That's the number of key primaries we're watching in Arizona and Missouri on Tuesday night. And as FiveThirtyEight's Geoffrey Skelley and Nathaniel Rakich write, both states have some pretty wide-open races where a full-blown election denier could grab the reins on the GOP side. We'll be back Tuesday with our preview of the key races to watch in Kansas, Michigan and Washington and please join us Tuesday as we live blog the results at FiveThirtyEight.

THE PLAYLIST

ABC News' "Start Here" Podcast. "Start Here" begins Monday morning with a look at the deadly floods in eastern Kentucky as survivors brace for more rain this week. ABC's Mola Lenghi leads us off. Then, ABC News medical contributor Dr. Darien Sutton discusses President Biden's COVID-19 "rebound" case. And ABC's Trish Turner explains what's in Democrats' new climate bill that has the approval of Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. http://apple.co/2HPocUL

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY

  • Sens. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., and Rob Portman, R-Ohio, will appear for a one-hour debate starting at 7:30 p.m. ET at George Washington University's Jack Morton Auditorium. Organizers say the goal is "to reintroduce the culture of seeking common ground and consensus."
  • President Biden continues to isolate at the White House after testing positive for COVID, in an apparent rebound with the virus.

Download the ABC News app and select "The Note" as an item of interest to receive the day's sharpest political analysis.

The Note is a daily ABC News feature that highlights the day's top stories in politics. Please check back Tuesday for the latest.

Democrats meddle in Michigan GOP primary in latest attempt to promote far-right candidate .
The House Democrats’ campaign arm is trying to promote far-right candidates in primary races in swing districts as it hopes to create an easier path for the party to flip and retain seats in November. The strategy, described by two GOP operatives as “risky” for Democrats, comes as the party faces headwinds in keeping the majority in the lower chamber during the midterm election cycle.

usr: 0
This is interesting!