•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Case closed: Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans

02:30  23 february  2018
02:30  23 february  2018 Source:   latimes.com

Manafort Judge Criticizes Legal Teams Over Secret Filings

  Manafort Judge Criticizes Legal Teams Over Secret Filings The judge overseeing the money-laundering case of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort said there had been too many secret filings in the high-profile criminal prosecution and that she would make several of them public. “People are overdoing it just a little bit,” U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson said Wednesday, reminding the lawyers that her objective was to "include the public as much as possible." Still, several minutes later, she closed the courtroom for two hours to talk privately with prosecutors and defense lawyers.

These images, painted in ocher on the walls of three separate caves in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found. And new research suggests that all three were created not by humans , but by our ancient cousins the Neanderthals .

A collection of red dots. These images, painted in ocher on cave walls in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found. And all three were created not by humans , but by Neanderthals , scientists say.

Cave wall paintings from La Pasiega in northeastern Spain. The ladder shape, composed of red horizontal and vertical lines, dates to older than 64,000 years and must have been made by Neanderthals.© P. Saura, Breuil et al/Los Angeles Times/TNS Cave wall paintings from La Pasiega in northeastern Spain. The ladder shape, composed of red horizontal and vertical lines, dates to older than 64,000 years and must have been made by Neanderthals. A red hand stencil. A series of lines that look like a ladder. A collection of red dots.

These images, painted in ocher on the walls of three separate caves in Spain, are the oldest-known examples of cave art ever found. And new research suggests that all three were created not by humans, but by our ancient cousins the Neanderthals.

Loading...

Load Error

In a paper published Thursday in Science, an international team of archaeologists shows that each of the three paintings was executed at least 64,000 years ago - more than 20,000 years before the first modern humans arrived in Europe.

Tennis-Federer becomes oldest ATP world number one

  Tennis-Federer becomes oldest ATP world number one Switzerland's Roger Federer returned to the top of the ATP World rankings for the first time since 2012 after beating Dutchman Robin Haase to reach the semi-finals of the ABN AMRO tournament in Rotterdam on Friday. The 36-year-old won 4-6 6-1 6-1 guaranteeing himself enough points to become the oldest player to top the standings since computerised rankings were introduced in 1973.Federer first topped the world rankings in 2004 and holds the record of 302 weeks at the summit.American Andre Agassi was the previous oldest player to be ranked world number one having achieved it, aged 33, in 2003.

And new research suggests that all three were created not by humans , but by our ancient cousins the Neanderthals . Case closed : Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans .

These images, painted in ocher on cave walls in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found. And all three were created not by humans , but by Neanderthals , scientists say. Invalid query: Table 'rss_articles' is marked as crashed and should be repaired.

"This work confirms that Neanderthals were indeed using cave walls for depicting drawings that had meaning for them," said Marie Soressi, an archaeologist at Leiden University in the Netherlands who was not involved in the study. "It also means that our own group, the one we call anatomically modern humans, is maybe not so special."

For most of the last century, researchers have argued that our Neanderthal cousins were intellectually inferior to their modern human contemporaries - incapable of symbolic thought and possibly devoid of language. This, in turn, was used to explain why the Neanderthals disappeared from Eurasia about 40,000 years ago, not long after modern humans arrived there.

However, archaeological evidence revealed over the last two decades tells a different story. We now know that Neanderthals were sophisticated hunters who knew how to control fire, and that they adorned themselves with jewelry and took care to bury their dead.

Experts agree: There’s no real threat of a robot uprising anytime soon

  Experts agree: There’s no real threat of a robot uprising anytime soon The Twitterati have been freaked out for several days now over a video showcasing the creepy door-opening ability of the SpotMini, a dog-like robot from Boston Dynamics. The robot is so creepily life-like, it quickly became the top trending video on Tuesday and prompted a flurry of only slightly humorous tweets warning that the beginning of the end of the Age of Man had arrived.Take heart, though, ye who fear the Singularity and the Rise of the Machines are at hand. David Held, an assistant professor in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science, is an expert in robots and robotic manipulation.

These images, painted in ocher on the walls of three separate caves in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found. And new research suggests that all three were created not by humans , but by our ancient cousins the Neanderthals .

Case closed : Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans via LA Times These images, painted in ocher on cave walls in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found.

In addition, genetic evidence suggests that modern humans and Neanderthals were similar enough that they interbred with some frequency. Indeed, if you are of European or Asian descent, it is likely that roughly 2 percent of your genome comes from Neanderthal ancestors.

Still, Soressi said the discovery that at least three instances of known cave art were created by Neanderthals is significant.

"The one criteria left that would have distinguished Neanderthals and early modern humans was the interest and need to draw symbols deep in the underground," she said.

Thanks to the new discovery, she added, we now know that Neanderthals and modern humans had that in common as well.

For this work, archaeologists traveled to three different cave sites across Spain: La Pasiega in the northeast, which is home to the mysterious ladder-shaped painting; Maltravieso in the west, where the hand stencil was found; and Ardales in the south, where red dots were painted on curtain formations inside the cave.

Experts: Underwater archaeology site imperiled in Mexico

  Experts: Underwater archaeology site imperiled in Mexico Pollution is threatening the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system in the Yucatan Peninsula, a vast underground network that experts in Mexico say could be the most important underwater archaeological site in the world.Subaquatic archaeologist Guillermo de Anda said the cave system's historical span is likely unrivaled. Some of the oldest human remains on the continent have been found there, dating back more than 12,000 years, and now-extinct animal remains push the horizon back to 15,000 years.

Case closed . Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans . These images, painted in ocher on cave walls in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found.

A red hand stencil. A series of lines that look like a ladder. A collection of red dots. These images, painted in ocher on cave walls in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found. And all three were created not by humans , but by Neanderthals , scientists say.

Dirk Hoffman, the archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, who led the work, said the team targeted symbolic, nonfigurative art, which they guessed would be some of the earliest paintings in each of the caves.

Each of these works of art took some planning to execute - requiring a light source, the preparation of pigments, and a decision about where to place the painting.

The hand stencil in particular is a relatively demanding piece to do, Hoffman said. The artist placed his or her hand on the wall and then painted over it. When the hand was removed, its "negative" was left, imprinted on the cave.

To determine the age of the paintings, the researchers used a technique known as uranium-thorium dating that measures the age of calcitic crusts that form on the walls of caves. By calculating the age of crusts that formed over the paintings, the authors were able to discern minimum ages for the artworks.

The uranium-thorium dating technique requires a very small sample of the carbonate crust - about 10 milligrams. The researchers carefully scraped the crust off the paintings without damaging the art, then sent the samples to two labs for analysis.

Roman 'gate to hell' was once site of deadly sacrifices

  Roman 'gate to hell' was once site of deadly sacrifices To the disbelief of spectators, all of the animals which entered into the gates perished, while miraculously, the priests emerged unscathed. To onlookers, it must have seemed as if they were imbued with special powers as a result of their divine connection.Research newly published February 12 in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences has provided a geological explanation for these strange happenings. Emissions of carbon dioxide gas were likely responsible for the deaths of the animals.

George Carvalho @gascarvalho 🔁 Neanderthals were capable of making art - bbc.co.uk. Kitten on the Keys @kittenonthekeys 🔁 Case closed : Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans Los Angeles Times - 5h ag twitter.com o.

Case closed : Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans . These images, painted in ocher on cave walls in Spain, are the oldest - known examples of cave art ever found.

The results indicated that the ladder shape was painted no later than 64,800 years ago, and the hand stencil goes back at least 66,700 years. The oldest of the red markings on the curtain formations dated back at least 65,500 years.

"Keep in mind, these are minimum ages," Hoffman said. "We have no idea how much time elapsed at the three caves between the painting act and calcite precipitating on it."

Even so, these findings show beyond a shadow of a doubt that the three paintings were created by Neanderthals, the researchers wrote, as there were no other hominids living on the Iberian Peninsula before roughly 40,000 years ago.

Matthew Pope, an archaeologist at the University College of London who was not involved in the work, said the new study won't necessarily change how he and his colleagues think about Neanderthals. At this point, many of them have already concluded that our ancient relatives had gotten woefully short shrift in the past, he said.

But he added that the work "may remove one of the last elements that separate the behavior of Neanderthal populations from modern humans in the archaeological record."

In other words, Neanderthals may have looked different than modern humans, but cognitively it appears they were just like us.

Soressi, the archaeologist from Leiden University, said one complication of these recent revelations is that it makes the demise of the Neanderthals harder to explain.

"All of what we know today tells us that it is not because Neanderthals were dummies that they disappeared," she said.

As for what the paintings meant to their creators, Hoffman said we may never know.

However, he said the team of researchers is already at work dating paintings at other cave sites.

"It is certainly possible to find as old or even older cave art in other parts of Europe or even outside Europe," he said. "We will see what future dating work tells us."

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

Trump: Dem memo proves 'illegal' things were done .
President Trump on Saturday claimed that the House Intelligence Committee Democrats' memo proves that the FBI and Justice Department committed "terrible" and "illegal" acts. "The Democrat memo response on government surveillance abuses is a total political and legal BUST," the president tweeted. "Just confirms all of the terrible things that were done. SO ILLEGAL!" "The Democrat memo response on government surveillance abuses is a total political and legal BUST," the president tweeted. "Just confirms all of the terrible things that were done.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!