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Technology John Sulston, who decoded the human genome, dies at 75

00:30  10 march  2018
00:30  10 march  2018 Source:   ap.org

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Sir John Sulston , a key figure in the race to decode the human genome , has died at the age of 75 . Sir John Sulston will be remembered as one of the greatest scientists of our time. His great adversary was Prof Craig Venter, who led private efforts to sequence and patent human genes

Sir John Sulston , leader of the UK effort to sequence the human genome , has died at the age of 75 . Prof Sir Mike Stratton, director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute, said: “We all feel the loss today of a great scientific visionary and leader who made historic, landmark contributions to knowledge of

FILE - A Monday, Feb. 12, 2001 file photo ofJohn Sulston, former director of the Sanger Center and leader of the UK effort to sequence the human genome, stands infront of a picture of a model of the DNA double helix after a press conference to announce the completion of the mapping of the human genome. John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75. (AP Photo/Adam Butler, File) © The Associated Press FILE - A Monday, Feb. 12, 2001 file photo ofJohn Sulston, former director of the Sanger Center and leader of the UK effort to sequence the human genome, stands infront of a picture of a model of the DNA double helix after a press conference to announce the completion of the mapping of the human genome. John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75. (AP Photo/Adam Butler, File)

LONDON — John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75.

The Wellcome Sanger Institute, the successor to the cutting-edge genomic research center he once founded and directed, confirmed Friday that Sulston had died but did not say when or give the cause of death.

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John E. Sulston , a scientist who won the Nobel Prize for work on one of the lowliest of nature’s creatures, which provided insights into the genetic processes by which human beings develop, and who also led the British effort to decode the human genome , died March 6 at 75 .

LONDON -- John Sulston , a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome , has died . He was 75 . The Wellcome Sanger Institute, the successor to the cutting-edge genomic research centre he once founded and directed, confirmed Friday that Sulston had died , but

Sulston shared the prize in 2002 for his contribution to work unraveling how genes control cell division. He traced the adult nematode worm, C. elegans, to decipher how cells divide and create something new — findings the Sanger Institute said were key to understanding how cancers develop.

"He had a burning and unrelenting commitment to making genome data open to all without restriction and his leadership in this regard is in large part responsible for the free access now enjoyed," Mike Stratton, the institute's director, said.

"We all feel the loss today of a great scientific visionary and leader who made historic, landmark contributions to knowledge of the living world, and established a mission and agenda that defines 21st century science," Stratton added.

Sulston was fascinated from an early age with the mechanical workings of organisms.

He graduated from Cambridge University in 1963, and did postdoctoral research in California before joining Sydney Brenner's group at the Cambridge University molecular biology lab, where the structure of DNA was first identified. They published the gene map of the nematode worm in 1990.

In 1992, Sulston was appointed director of the Sanger Center, established at Cambridge to spearhead the British contribution to the international Human Genome Project.

He shared the 2002 Nobel Prize for medicine with Brenner and Robert Horvitz for their work.

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They have killer immune systems.In an article published in Nature Communications, researchers from South China Normal University in Guangzhou, China report that they sequenced and analyzed the genome of Periplaneta americana, and in the process they discovered just how indestructible this scourge is. They found that the cockroach (native to Africa, despite its American moniker) has more DNA than any other insect whose DNA has been sequenced except the migratory locust. The size of its genome—3.3 billion base pairs—is comparable to that of humans.

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