Technology: John Sulston, who decoded the human genome, dies at 75 - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Technology John Sulston, who decoded the human genome, dies at 75

00:30  10 march  2018
00:30  10 march  2018 Source:   ap.org

DNA suggests 10,000-year-old Brit had dark skin, blue eyes

  DNA suggests 10,000-year-old Brit had dark skin, blue eyes Researchers say DNA from a 10,000-year-old skeleton found in an English cave suggests he had dark skin and blue eyes.Scientists from Britain's Natural History Museum and University College London have analyzed the genome of "Cheddar Man," who was found in Cheddar Gorge in southwest England in 1903. It is the oldest complete skeleton found in Britain.

John Sulston , a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome , has died . He was 75 .The Wellcome Sanger Institute, the successor to the cutting-edge genomic research center he once founded and directed

LONDON (AP) — John Sulston , a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome , has died . He was 75 . The Sanger Center, the cutting-edge genomic research center he once ran, confirmed Friday that Sulston had died .

FILE - A Monday, Feb. 12, 2001 file photo ofJohn Sulston, former director of the Sanger Center and leader of the UK effort to sequence the human genome, stands infront of a picture of a model of the DNA double helix after a press conference to announce the completion of the mapping of the human genome. John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75. (AP Photo/Adam Butler, File) © The Associated Press FILE - A Monday, Feb. 12, 2001 file photo ofJohn Sulston, former director of the Sanger Center and leader of the UK effort to sequence the human genome, stands infront of a picture of a model of the DNA double helix after a press conference to announce the completion of the mapping of the human genome. John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75. (AP Photo/Adam Butler, File)

LONDON — John Sulston, a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome, has died. He was 75.

The Wellcome Sanger Institute, the successor to the cutting-edge genomic research center he once founded and directed, confirmed Friday that Sulston had died but did not say when or give the cause of death.

EU gives internet giants an hour to remove terrorist content

  EU gives internet giants an hour to remove terrorist content EU steps up pressure on companies such as Facebook and Google for the speedy removal of all illegal content.The European Commission on Thursday increased the pressure on internet companies with sweeping recommendations for companies and EU nations regarding the speedy removal of all illegal content, including terrorist content, incitement to hatred and violence, child sexual abuse material, counterfeit products and copyright infringement.

LONDON (AP) — John Sulston , a Nobel Prize-winning British scientist who helped decode the human genome , has died . He was 75 . In 1992, Sulston was appointed director of the Sanger Center, established at Cambridge to spearhead the British contribution to the international Human

John E. Sulston , a scientist who won the Nobel Prize for work on one of the lowliest of nature’s creatures, which provided insights into the genetic processes by which human beings develop, and who also led the British effort to decode the human genome , died March 6 at 75 .

Sulston shared the prize in 2002 for his contribution to work unraveling how genes control cell division. He traced the adult nematode worm, C. elegans, to decipher how cells divide and create something new — findings the Sanger Institute said were key to understanding how cancers develop.

"He had a burning and unrelenting commitment to making genome data open to all without restriction and his leadership in this regard is in large part responsible for the free access now enjoyed," Mike Stratton, the institute's director, said.

"We all feel the loss today of a great scientific visionary and leader who made historic, landmark contributions to knowledge of the living world, and established a mission and agenda that defines 21st century science," Stratton added.

Sulston was fascinated from an early age with the mechanical workings of organisms.

He graduated from Cambridge University in 1963, and did postdoctoral research in California before joining Sydney Brenner's group at the Cambridge University molecular biology lab, where the structure of DNA was first identified. They published the gene map of the nematode worm in 1990.

In 1992, Sulston was appointed director of the Sanger Center, established at Cambridge to spearhead the British contribution to the international Human Genome Project.

He shared the 2002 Nobel Prize for medicine with Brenner and Robert Horvitz for their work.

Oldest male dolphin in the US dies at California park at 54 .
<p>Semo, the oldest known male bottlenose dolphin in the United States, has died at a Northern California theme park where he was a fan favorite.</p>The San Francisco Chronicle says Semo died Tuesday at age 54.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!