Technology: Our 1st interstellar visitor likely came from 2-star system - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Our 1st interstellar visitor likely came from 2-star system

01:40  20 march  2018
01:40  20 march  2018 Source:   ap.org

Interstellar Asteroids Trapped by the Sun and Jupiter Could Deliver Alien Life to Our Solar System

  Interstellar Asteroids Trapped by the Sun and Jupiter Could Deliver Alien Life to Our Solar System There could be thousands of rocks from distant solar systems just killing time in our neighborhood.The high number is the result of the inexorable tug of the two largest objects in our neighborhood, the sun and Jupiter. "The solar system acts as a fishing net," co-author Avi Loeb, an astronomer at Harvard University, told Newsweek. "Just like when you go fishing with a net you catch some fish, the solar system can capture interstellar objects.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two - star system . That’s the latest from astronomers who were amazed by the mysterious cigar-shaped object, detected as it passed through our inner solar system last fall.

Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two - star system . That’s the latest from astronomers who were amazed by the mysterious cigar-shaped object, detected as it passed through our inner solar system last fall. The University of Toronto’s Alan Jackson reported Monday that the

This artist's rendering shows the first interstellar asteroid: 'Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on Oct. 19, 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii. The University of Toronto's Alan Jackson reported Monday, March 19, 2018, that the asteroid — the first confirmed object in our solar system originating elsewhere — is probably from a binary star system. That's where two stars orbit a common center. According to Jackson and his team, the asteroid was likely ejected from its system as planets formed. (M. Kornmesser/European Southern Observatory via AP) © The Associated Press This artist's rendering shows the first interstellar asteroid: 'Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on Oct. 19, 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii. The University of Toronto's Alan Jackson reported Monday, March 19, 2018, that the asteroid — the first confirmed object in our solar system originating elsewhere — is probably from a binary star system. That's where two stars orbit a common center. According to Jackson and his team, the asteroid was likely ejected from its system as planets formed. (M. Kornmesser/European Southern Observatory via AP)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two-star system.

NASA’s Webb Telescope Will Look For Interstellar Water

  NASA’s Webb Telescope Will Look For Interstellar Water The James Webb Space Telescope will be NASA’s successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, and the project is a partnership with the European Space Agency and Canadian Space Agency.

Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two - star system .That's the latest from The University of Toronto's Alan Jackson reported Monday, March 19, 2018, that the asteroid — the first confirmed object in our solar system originating elsewhere — is probably from a binary star system .

Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two - star system . According to Jackson and his team, the asteroid was likely ejected from its system as planets formed. "It has been wandering interstellar space for a long time since," the scientists wrote in the Royal Astronomical Society's.

That's the latest from astronomers who were amazed by the mysterious cigar-shaped object, detected as it passed through our inner solar system last fall.

The University of Toronto's Alan Jackson reported Monday that the asteroid — the first confirmed object in our solar system originating elsewhere — is probably from a binary star system. That's where two stars orbit a common center. According to Jackson and his team, the asteroid was likely ejected from its system as planets formed.

"It has been wandering interstellar space for a long time since," the scientists wrote in the Royal Astronomical Society's journal, Monthly Notices .

Discovered in October by a telescope in Hawaii millions of miles away, the asteroid is called Oumuamua, Hawaiian for messenger from afar arriving first, or scout. The red-tinged rock is estimated to be possibly 1,300 feet (400 meters) long and zooming away from the Earth and sun at more than 16 miles (26 kilometers) per second.

Here's where we're actually looking for intelligent life

  Here's where we're actually looking for intelligent life Ever wish E.T. would phone your home? The scientists at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute do. They seek unnatural variations in light and radio waves that may indicate alien civilizations.  To keep an eye out for distant lasers that could head toward our neighborhood, we have to watch the entire sky. SETI plans to put 96 cameras at 12 sites across the world to monitor for flashes as brief as a millisecond or less. Shine on, aliens.

Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two - star system . According to Jackson and his team, the asteroid was likely ejected from its system as planets formed. "It has been wandering interstellar space for a long time since," the scientists wrote in the Royal Astronomical Society's

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Our first known interstellar visitor likely came from a two - star system . That’s the latest from astronomers who were amazed That’s where two stars orbit a common center. According to Jackson and his team, the asteroid was likely ejected from its system as planets formed.

Last month, a science team led by Wesley Fraser of Queen's University Belfast reported that Oumuamua is actually tumbling through space, likely the result of a collision with another asteroid or other object that kicked it out of its home solar system. He expects it to continue tumbling for billions of more years.

Scientists originally thought it might be an icy comet, but now agree it is an asteroid.

"The same way we use comets to better understand planet formation in our own solar system, maybe this curious object can tell us more about how planets form in other systems." Jackson said in a statement.

Close binary star systems may be the source of the majority of interstellar objects out there, both icy comets and rocky asteroids, according to the researchers.

Scientists develop a 3-D view of an interstellar cloud, where stars are born .
Two astronomers from Greece have managed to model the three-dimensional structure of an interstellar gas cloud, and found that it's on the order of 10 times more spacious than it originally appeared. The shape and structure of Musca, described in the journal Science, could help scientists probe the mysterious origins and evolution of stars - and by extension, the planets that surround them. Load Error

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