•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Scientists Sequenced Genomes Of 40,000-Year-Old Neanderthals

12:07  22 march  2018
12:07  22 march  2018 Source:   ibtimes.com

Climate advocacy group sues U.S. EPA for 'purge' of scientists

  Climate advocacy group sues U.S. EPA for 'purge' of scientists A climate change advocacy group on Tuesday sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for banning certain scientists from serving on its advisory committees, a move the group said will give business an unfair influence on policy. The lawsuit, filed on Tuesday by the Union of Concerned Scientists in federal court in Boston, reflects rising tensions between environmental advocates and the administration of President Donald Trump over its efforts to roll back climate change regulations to boost industry.

They became extinct about 40 , 000 years ago. Neanderthals and modern humans share 99.7% of their DNA Reconstruction of a 60, 000 - year - old ribcage using 3D imaging reveals Neanderthals stood Now, researchers have sequenced the genome of an ancient hominin individual from Siberia

Neanderthals , alternatively spelt as " Neandertals ", are an extinct species or subspecies of archaic humans who lived in Eurasia until about 40 , 000 years ago ( 40 kya).

a man looking at the camera© Provided by IBT US

How did Neanderthals evolve? How did their population dwindle, eventually causing them to die out? In order to address these questions and other mysteries surrounding the evolution of Neanderthals, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, sequenced the genomes of five Neanderthals. The new study has helped researchers figure out some details about the last remaining Neanderthals that lived in Eurasia.

The Neanderthals whose genomes were sequenced lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago and came from different geographical regions. These Neanderthals once lived in what is present day Belgium, France, Croatia, and Russia and represent the group of last survivors in Europe.

Case closed: Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans

  Case closed: Oldest known cave art proves Neanderthals were just as sophisticated as humans A red hand stencil. A series of lines that look like a ladder. A collection of red dots. These images, painted in ocher on the walls of three separate caves in Spain, are the oldest-known examples of cave art ever found. These images, painted in ocher on the walls of three separate caves in Spain, are the oldest-known examples of cave art ever found. And new research suggests that all three were created not by humans, but by our ancient cousins the Neanderthals.

And 40 , 000 years ago, human genomes may have contained twice as much Neanderthal DNA, according to a study published today (June 22) in Genetic material recovered from 40 , 000 - year - old human bones unearthed in Romania harbors about 6-9 percent Neanderthal DNA, the study reports.

This article is more than 9 years old . Scientists led by Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig took four years to sequence the whole Neanderthal genome from powdered bone fragments taken from three females who lived in Europe 40 , 000 years ago.

The genomes of these five Neanderthals were compared to those of older ones, who once lived in the Altai Mountains. Scientists discovered that these late Neanderthals are far more closely related to their later cousins who contributed DNA to our modern ancestors, than to the older Neanderthals.

Upper molar of a male Neandertal from Spy, Belgium.Photo: I. Crevecoeur

The genomes of the five Neanderthals also provided clues about a turnover in their population, as these ancient hominids’ existence slowly came to an end.

“We see that the genetic similarity between these Neandertals is well-correlated with their geographical location. By comparing these genomes to the genome of an older Neandertal from the Caucasus we show that Neandertal populations seem to have moved and replaced each other towards the end of their history”, Mateja Hajdinjak lead author of the study, said in a statement.

Scientists discover possible link between dark matter and super-cooled star formation

  Scientists discover possible link between dark matter and super-cooled star formation Scientists have long attempted to paint a detailed picture of what the universe looked like in the immediate aftermath of the big bang, and new research suggests that some of their most basic assumptions have been entirely incorrect. Researchers studying some of the most ancient regions of the cosmos have discovered a radio signal that suggests the earliest stars were born from incredibly frigid hydrogen gas, roughly twice as cold as previous estimates suggested.The study, which was published in Nature, focused on detecting signals that were born in the young universe.

Genetic studies on Neanderthal ancient DNA became possible in the late 1990s. The Neanderthal genome project, established in 2006

A 40 , 000 year - old Homo sapiens with a Neanderthal ancestor a few generations back, recently found in Romania, also bolsters this notion. But the most compelling evidence that inter-species hanky-panky in Late Pleistocene Eurasia may not have been that rare lies in the genes of contemporary humans.

Researchers also compared the Neanderthals’ genomes to modern humans, living today, which reinforced their discovery of these Neanderthals’ DNA being more similar to those who contributed DNA to modern-day humans living outside Africa than older ones who lived in Siberia.

Scientists also discovered that despite four of these late Neanderthals having lived in an era when modern humans had already begun living in Europe, none of them had any detectable amounts of modern human DNA.

“It may be that gene flow was mostly unidirectional, from Neandertals into modern humans”, said Svante Pääbo, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

“Our work demonstrates that the generation of genome sequences from a large number of archaic human individuals is now technically feasible, and opens the possibility to study Neandertal populations across their temporal and geographical range”, said Janet Kelso, who co-authored the new study.

Since there are only a limited number of Neanderthal specimens available at present and obtaining DNA from such old specimens can be a challenge, there are very few Neanderthals whose genomes have been sequenced. However, the new research has added five additional new Neanderthal genomes from a wider geographical range, which may aid further research into these prehistoric ancestors of modern humans.

The new study has been published in the journal Nature.

date calculated: On this day the universe will go down .
© Getty Images Scientists at Harvard University have now been able to calculate an exact date on which the universe is going to go down That the world is going to go down has been for a long time for most people an existing fact. However, the entire universe actually has an expiry date - and this is exactly what scientists at Harvard University have now calculated. Exact Day Calculates Recently University of Harvard scientists reviewed the thesis whether the universe has an expiration date.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!