•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Cockroach DNA Shows Why They're Basically Indestructible

00:27  24 march  2018
00:27  24 march  2018 Source:   mentalfloss.com

A fertility doctor's secret, a special kinship decades later

  A fertility doctor's secret, a special kinship decades later ZIONSVILLE, Ind. — Matt White remembers that day in September 2016 when a mystery began to unravel that would change his life.It started when White read a news report that Dr. Donald Cline, a retired Indianapolis fertility specialist, faced charges for lying when he denied he'd inseminated unwitting patients with his own sperm decades earlier. He searched out Cline's address online, recognizing it as the location of his mother's former doctor. Then he Googled the doctor's name. WhenIt started when White read a news report that Dr. Donald Cline, a retired Indianapolis fertility specialist, faced charges for lying when he denied he'd inseminated unwitting patients with his own sperm decades earlier.

They found that the cockroach (native to Africa, despite its American moniker) has more DNA than any other insect whose DNA has been sequenced except the They also have killer immune systems able to withstand pathogens they might pick up from the rotting food they eat and the filth they like to live in.

Elements Сезон 2 • Серия 38 Cockroaches Are Indestructible , And the Secret Is in Their Genome - Продолжительность: 3:38 Seeker Recommended for you. Why are Cockroaches so incredibly hard to kill?

a insect on the ground: Cockroach DNA Shows Why They're Basically Indestructible © iStock Cockroach DNA Shows Why They're Basically Indestructible

Most people are all too aware that cockroaches are horrifyingly resilient beings. Yes, they can and have survived nuclear blasts, and surely stand to inherit the Earth after we all succumb to the apocalypse. Why is this creature able to thrive in the face of pesticides, the loss of limbs, disgusting conditions, a range of climates, and even nuclear fallout, in urban kitchens across the world? As Inside Science reports, a new study on the genome of the American cockroach shows that certain genes are key to its wild evolutionary success.

Virginia student's murder sparks bid to expand DNA databank

  Virginia student's murder sparks bid to expand DNA databank Before Jesse Matthew killed 18-year-old Hannah Graham, authorities say he left a trail of DNA evidence linking him to a 2005 rape and the 2009 slaying of another female student.Virginia law didn't call for it. For Sue Graham, that's one of the most painful aspects of her daughter's slaying: knowing that her killer could have been locked up and unable to prey on her if only police had been able to take that DNA sample.

Watch: Cockroaches Survive Squeezing, Smashing, and More | National Geographic. Have you ever wondered why cockroaches are so hard to get rid of? Well, now scientists have put them before a series of obstacles to find out how tough they

The cockroach genome is fully sequenced! Here's how we could benefit from the secrets embedded in their unique DNA . There Are Bugs In Your Food! A new study, published today in Nature Communication, unpacks the genes that make roaches tick—and helps explain why they ’ re so damn

In an article published in Nature Communications, researchers from South China Normal University in Guangzhou, China report that they sequenced and analyzed the genome of Periplaneta americana, and in the process they discovered just how indestructible this scourge is. They found that the cockroach (native to Africa, despite its American moniker) has more DNA than any other insect whose DNA has been sequenced except the migratory locust. The size of its genome—3.3 billion base pairs—is comparable to that of humans.

They have a huge number of gene families (several times the number other insects have) related to sensory reception, including 154 smell receptors and 522 taste receptors, including 329 taste receptors specifically related to bitter tastes. These extra smell and taste receptors may help cockroaches avoid toxic food (say, your household pesticide) and give them the ability to adapt to a multitude of different diets in different environments.

They also have killer immune systems able to withstand pathogens they might pick up from the rotting food they eat and the filth they like to live in. They have many more genes related to immunity compared to other insects.

The genome analysis might give us more than just a newfound respect for this revolting pest. The researchers hope to find a way to harness this new knowledge of cockroach immunity to control vermin populations—and create an eradication method slightly more effective than just stomping on them.

[h/t Inside Science]

Patton Oswalt 'Didn't Sleep for 2 Days' After Alleged Golden State Killer's Arrest: 'I Was Zombified' .
People Explains: 'Golden State Killer' Suspect Identified as 72-Year-Old Ex-Cop Police have arrested a suspect in the decades-long search for the Golden State Killer, a suspected serial killer and rapist in the 1970s and ’80s For Patton Oswalt, the arrest of the alleged Golden State Killer brought about a torrent of emotions. The actor and comedian’s late wife, Michelle McNamara, had made it her mission to catch the man linked through DNA to 12 murders, 45 sexual assaults and more than 120 burglaries committed in California between 1976 and 1986. Her bestselling book, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, chronicles her tireless investigation of the long-cold case. So when police arrested Sacramento-area resident Joseph James DeAngelo in April on multiple murder charges, accusing him of being the infamous serial killer, Oswalt had a strong reaction. “I was just zombified for two days,” he told reporters including PEOPLE on Monday from the red carpet of the NBC Upfronts at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. “I didn’t sleep for two days after. ‘Cause we started getting pinged at like 3 a.m. with, ‘They caught him.’ And all the texts started coming in.” Oswalt said the reality of the arrest still hasn’t sunk in. “I have not processed it yet. It’s just too huge,” he said. “It would be false for me to be like, ‘Here’s how I feel,’ three weeks after. I’ve not processed it yet. It’s too giant [and] surreal. Catch me again in a month.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!