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Technology Mexico data protection body to investigate possible links to Cambridge Analytica

07:46  10 april  2018
07:46  10 april  2018 Source:   reuters.com

Cambridge Analytica might have accessed private Facebook messages

  Cambridge Analytica might have accessed private Facebook messages Facebook just began notifying people if their information was accessed by Cambridge Analytica today. Soon after, the social media company created a Help Center page that you can check to see if you were one of the affected members who logged into quiz app This Is Your Digital Life. Apparently, doing so not only shared your News Feed, timeline and posts, but also your private messages. Facebook confirmed to Wired that the app used a read_mailbox permission, which, unlike other sensitive permissions that Facebook phased out a in April of 2015, didn't fully deprecate until October of that same year. Wired reports that while users would have needed to give their permission for the app (and hence Cambridge Analytica) to access their message inboxes, the request would have likely been hidden in with a bunch of other permission requests, which users may have missed when "agreeing" to share their data. Facebook says that a total of 1,500 people gave This Is Your Digital Life permission, though the total of actual users affected is unknown. The problem goes beyond those that granted permission to share; if you in some way messaged with any of those users, you might be also impacted.

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico ’s data protection body said on Monday it had opened an investigation into whether companies possibly linked to political consultancy Cambridge Analytica broke the country’s data protection laws. INAI, the transparency and data protection regulator, said

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico 's data - protection body said on Monday it had opened an investigation into whether companies possibly linked to political consultancy Cambridge Analytica broke the country's data - protection laws. INAI, the transparency and data - protection regulator, said

The nameplate of political consultancy, Cambridge Analytica, is seen in central London © REUTERS/Henry Nicholls The nameplate of political consultancy, Cambridge Analytica, is seen in central London

Mexico's data protection body said on Monday it had opened an investigation into whether companies possibly linked to political consultancy Cambridge Analytica broke the country's data protection laws.

INAI, the transparency and data protection regulator, said it was looking at Mexican companies that worked with cellphone app Pig.gi, which gives users free top-ups in exchange for receiving ads and completing surveys.

The app cut ties with Cambridge Analytica in Mexico after the British company was accused by a whistleblower of improperly accessing data to target U.S. and British voters in recent elections.

Pig.gi, which has 1 million downloads in Mexico and Colombia combined, said it had shared results of two election polls of Mexican users with the consultancy and other partners.

Cambridge Analytica has denied Facebook data was used to help to build profiles on American voters and build support for Donald Trump in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

(Reporting by Christine Murray and Lizbeth Diaz; Editing by Michael Perry)

Facebook suspends Trump-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica .
Late Friday night, Facebook has announced it's suspending Strategic Communication Laboratories (SCL) from its site. While you may not have heard of SCL, its political analytics firm Cambridge Analytica has made headlines in the last few years due to its work for the Trump campaign and the Brexit initiative. According to former US Magistrate and current Facebook Deputy General Counsel Paul Grewal, this move is occurring because an app "thisisyourdigitallife" pulled in personal information of the 270,000 people who used it as well as information from their friends.

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