•   
  •   
  •   

Technology NASA’s Newest Satellite Will Scan the Universe for Undiscovered Exoplanets

17:01  13 april  2018
17:01  13 april  2018 Source:   seeker.com

A second 'Big Bang' could end our universe in an instant — and it's all because of a tiny particle that controls the laws of physics

  A second 'Big Bang' could end our universe in an instant — and it's all because of a tiny particle that controls the laws of physics NASA Physicists found that our universe will likely end the way it began, with a second 'Big Bang.' This is because of an unstable Higgs Boson particle. If the particle's mass changes, it could upend the laws of physics. The researchers think our

NASA ' s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will zero in on 200,000 stars, which could potentially yield hundreds of new exoplanet discoveries. TESS will target areas of the sky where new planets will likely be easier to spot than those studied by the venerable Kepler Space Telescope

NASA will launch its Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) in hopes of discovering new exoplanets around nearby stars that could harbor alien life. Scientists detect signals from what could be the oldest stars in the universe .

  NASA’s Newest Satellite Will Scan the Universe for Undiscovered Exoplanets © NASA

The space agency’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is scheduled for launch next week and is expected to add significantly to the number of known exoplanets.NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will zero in on 200,000 stars, which could potentially yield hundreds of new exoplanet discoveries. TESS will target areas of the sky where new planets will likely be easier to spot than those studied by the venerable Kepler Space Telescope, giving observatories on the ground a better chance of confirming the discovery of new exoplanets.

TESS is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base April 16 and will make its way to an Earth orbit with lowest and highest altitudes of 67,000 miles and 232,000 miles. It will study different parts of the sky in observing campaigns of almost one month each, ferrying data back to Earth about what it sees.

NASA Tess spacecraft to prowl for planets as galactic scout

  NASA Tess spacecraft to prowl for planets as galactic scout Look up at the sky tonight. Every star you see, plus hundreds of thousands, even millions more, will come under the intense stare of NASA's newest planet hunter. Look up at the sky tonight. Every star you see, plus hundreds of thousands, even millions more, will come under the intense stare of NASA's newest planet hunter.

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), the heir to NASA ’ s Kepler exoplanet mission throne, is set to orbit Earth while pointing it’s viewfinders out to space. Much like NASA ’ s Kepler space observatory, TESS will use its high-spec tech to pinpoint undiscovered planets.

RELATED: NASA ’ s Newest Satellite Will Scan the Universe for Undiscovered Exoplanets . Pepe and his team at the European Southern Observatory are using ESPRESSO, the Echelle SPectrograph for Rocky Exoplanet and Stable Spectroscopic Observations

Like Kepler, TESS will examine stars and look for the telltale dimming, or “transit,” that takes place when a planet goes across the star's face. The observatory's information will be beamed back to the ground where other telescopes can look for small tugs or wobbles in the star's position, which would confirm a planet has been discovered.

"TESS was designed so the targets would be optimally based for ground-based follow up," principal investigator George Ricker, a senior scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told Seeker. "We want to make sure we can communicate to ground-based observers the information that we get in terms of candidate transit events, or planets."

RELATED: The Exoplanet Most Likely to Support Alien Life Might Not Be Habitable After All

NASA Is Launching Its Next Planet-Hunting Telescope

  NASA Is Launching Its Next Planet-Hunting Telescope Scientists are excited about the prospect the mission holds for new discoveries.The instrument, called the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and nicknamed TESS, is designed to identify thousands of exoplanets.

Next week, NASA is launching its new exoplanet hunter: a satellite that will stare out at the cosmos searching for never-before-seen worlds. TESS is launching on April 16th, just as NASA ’ s old exoplanet hunter is about to hang up its hat.

NASA ’ s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), which will scan the skies to look for planets Just last month, NASA ’ s Kepler telescope discovered 95 new exoplanets beyond our solar system This find confirmed that planets like the ones in our solar system could exist elsewhere in the universe .

With 200,000 high-priority targets, TESS investigators expect the first possible planets will come back to Earth within just a few weeks or months. The mission is currently funded for two years. In that time, it will locate hundreds of possible exoplanets, including a few dozen that are close to the size of Earth. Kepler has already located well over 2,000 planets, but the TESS stars will be brighter, closer, and easier to examine.

Kepler investigators, however, will get the second chance to look at planets discovered by the telescope during the second year of TESS’s operations. At first, TESS will spend a year moving its view around the southern hemisphere. Kepler's original field of view was the constellation Cygnus, in the north. Sometime during its second year of operations, TESS will spend a month staring at the same spot that Kepler examined for four years, between 2009 and 2013.

NASA, SpaceX to launch spacecraft to find another Earth

  NASA, SpaceX to launch spacecraft to find another Earth We speak to scientists behind a new mission to find nearby exoplanets that could host life.TESS, a new NASA planet-hunting spacecraft, is set to write the next revolutionary chapter in astronomy by revealing more details about the nearest exoplanets and, perhaps, uncovering the first signs of life seen beyond our spinning rock.

After a 2-day delay for extra checks, NASA ’ s latest exoplanet -hunting satellite , the Transiting Exoplanet Then, after 60 days of checks, TESS will begin scanning the skies for exoplanets . Ghostly particle caught in polar ice ushers in new way to look at the universe . Got a tip?

NASA ’ s TESS spacecraft will spend two years searching the sky for nearby alien worlds.Published The search for alien worlds, and perhaps alien life, will take another step outward on Wednesday when TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite , is launched into orbit around the Earth.

Engineers constructed TESS to last well beyond its original mission lifetime, as long as funding persists. The telescope will act as a finder telescope, searching for objects that are interesting, which other telescopes might zoom in on. A prominent follow-up telescope will be the James Webb Space Telescope, which is now expected to launch in 2020. Ideally, TESS and James Webb observations will overlap.

"The longer the mission will operate, the more precisely we can determine the properties of the [planetary] transits," Ricker said. Once they pinpoint the time it takes for a planet to go around a star, Webb can peer at the planet to learn more about its atmosphere. Other instruments, such as HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) at the La Silla Observatory, could measure a planet’s wobbles in order to estimate its mass.

As for Kepler, the telescope is still operational — albeit, running out of fuel. It should conclude its mission within a few months. The data it provided, however, will act as a treasure trove for years, giving investigators potential sources of information for future planetary surveys.

Now That TESS Is in Orbit, Here’s What Comes Next for NASA’s Exoplanet Hunter .
Nasa’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite lifted off from Cape Canaveral last week. Now the work begins. CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA's newest planet-hunting powerhouse, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), leaped into orbit April 18 atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.TESS lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station here at 6:51pm EDT (2251 GMT), then separated from its rocket ride 49 minutes later.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!