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Technology Facebook denies building eye-tracking software but says if it ever does, it will keep privacy in mind

21:07  13 june  2018
21:07  13 june  2018 Source:   cnbc.com

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Facebook denied building eye - tracking software in its response to questions from Congress released Monday but said if it ever did build out the technology, it would take privacy into account. The social media company holds at least two patents for detecting eye movements and emotions

Facebook denied building eye - tracking software in its response to questions from Congress released Monday but said if it ever did build out the technology, it would take privacy into account.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook Inc's annual F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, U.S. May 1, 2018.© Provided by CNBC Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook Inc's annual F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, U.S. May 1, 2018.

Facebook denied building eye-tracking software in its response to questions from Congress released Monday but said if it ever did build out the technology, it would take privacy into account.

The social media company holds at least two patents for detecting eye movements and emotions, which it said "is one way that we could potentially reduce consumer friction and add security for people when they log into Oculus or access Oculus content." Oculus is a virtual reality platform that Facebook bought in 2014.

Facebook reportedly gave personal data to 60 companies

  Facebook reportedly gave personal data to 60 companies Facebook struck dozens of data-sharing deals with smartphone and tablet makers over the last decade, according to a report by The New York Times. The newspaper revealed Sunday that Facebook had formed at least 60 data-sharing partnerships with device makers including Apple, Amazon, Microsoft and Samsung over the past 10 years. Without explicit consent, these deals granted device makers access to a Facebook user's relationship status, political leaning, education history, religion and upcoming events, the Times reported.

Facebook denies building eye - tracking software but says if it ever does , it will keep privacy in mind . cnbc. A short guide to cloud enablement | ZDNet.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg denied that the company is building eye - tracking software in a written document of answers to Congress. Company holds at least two patents for detecting eye movements and emotions.

The company provided a written response to unanswered questions from Congress on its data use, privacy policy and its ad-based business model. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was asked about its technologies and potential uses by lawmakers during an appearance before Congress in April.

"Right now we're not building technology to identify people with eye-tracking cameras," Facebook said in its written response. "If we implement this technology in the future, we will absolutely do so with people's privacy in mind, just as we do with movement information (which we anonymize in our systems)."

Facebook is still dealing with the fallout from reports of widespread data mishandling and abuse of sensitive user information, spurred by revelations that research firm Cambridge Analytica improperly accessed user information on as many as 87 million people.

The company has overhauled its privacy policies and vowed to be more transparent with users, investors and regulators going forward.

—CNBC's Arjun Kharpal contributed to this report.

Cambridge Analytica-linked researcher wants to stop the next data scandal .
Aleksandr Kogan tells Congress how Cambridge Analytica got data on 87 million people, and how to stop it from happening again.The University of Cambridge professor, who testified before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation on Tuesday, said Facebook's issues with Cambridge Analytica were "inevitable" because of how much data digital marketing harvests from people online.

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