Technology: Neptune looks beautifully blue in sharp new telescope image - PressFrom - US
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Technology Neptune looks beautifully blue in sharp new telescope image

21:11  18 july  2018
21:11  18 july  2018 Source:   cnet.com

NASA’s next flagship space telescope is delayed again

  NASA’s next flagship space telescope is delayed again NASA has again delayed the launch of its next-generation space observatory, known as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the space agency announced today. The telescope now has a new launch date of March 30th, 2021. It’s the second delay to the project’s timeline this year, and the third in the last nine months.“We’re all disappointed that the culmination of Webb and its launch is taking longer than expected, but we’re creating something new here.

This image of Neptune was obtained during the testing of the The new method delivers sharper and more detailed images , as seen in a comparison showing Neptune with the use of the adaptive optics and then the gas giant without, which makes the planet look like a vague and fuzzy blue ball.

This image of Neptune was obtained during the testing of the The new method delivers sharper and more detailed images , as seen in a comparison showing Neptune with the use of the adaptive optics and then the gas giant without, which makes the planet look like a vague and fuzzy blue ball.

This image of the planet Neptune was obtained during the testing of the Narrow-Field adaptive optics mode of the MUSE/GALACSI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope.© CNET This image of the planet Neptune was obtained during the testing of the Narrow-Field adaptive optics mode of the MUSE/GALACSI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope.

This image of Neptune was obtained during the testing of the Narrow-Field adaptive optics mode of the MUSE/GALACSI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope.

At its farthest, Neptune is nearly several billion miles (4.7 billion kilometers) away from Earth. Some of our best ever images came from NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft back in 1989, but we now have a fresh view of the azure planet to enjoy.

The European Southern Observatory's ground-based Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile got an upgrade that lets it rival and even exceed the imaging efforts of NASA's orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. The VLT turned its eyes to Neptune and some star clusters to test out its new capabilities.

NASA wants to train the James Webb Space Telescope on gas giants before searching for habitable worlds

  NASA wants to train the James Webb Space Telescope on gas giants before searching for habitable worlds When NASA finally sends its mega-powerful James Webb Space Telescope it will be the end of a long and troubled road, but it will also be the beginning of an extremely exciting time for astronomers. But as NASA explains in a new blog post, learning how to properly harness the telescope’s power won’t be an overnight affair, and it’s going to need a bit of training before it can really flex its muscles. To help scientists get a handle on how the powerful instrument works they’re going to point it at larger targets first, like massive gas giant exoplanets.

Several billion miles from Earth, Neptune 's looking particularly sharp in a set of new images captured by one of the most powerful telescopes in the world. Located in Chile, the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) used what's known as laser tomography to capture test

A new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows globular cluster NGC 1846, a spherical Since then, scientists have monitored Neptune using the Hubble Space Telescope and seen new storms develop. The photos are so crisp that they rival those taken by the Hubble Space Telescope .

The VLT's new adaptive optics technique uses lasers projected into the sky to help the telescope "correct for turbulence at different altitudes in the atmosphere." That turbulence can make distant objects in space appear blurred.

The new method delivers sharper and more detailed images, as seen in a comparison showing Neptune with the use of the adaptive optics and then the gas giant without, which makes the planet look like a vague and fuzzy blue ball.

a star filled sky: neptunecompareeso1824b© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. neptunecompareeso1824b

The Neptune image on the right is without the adaptive optics system in operation and the one on the left after the adaptive optics are switched on.

There's a good reason scientists are excited about the VLT's new skills.

"It will enable astronomers to study in unprecedented detail fascinating objects such as supermassive black holes at the centers of distant galaxies, jets from young stars, globular clusters, supernovae, planets and their satellites in the solar system and much more," says the ESO.

Can a New Telescope Spot Earth's Evasive Minimoons? .
New space technology hopes to spot and study the evasive minimoons sporadically entering Earth's orbit.Minimoons are small asteroids that temporarily enter Earth’s orbit. Because of their infrequent revolutions around the planet, existing technology can only capture them by chance. Scientists spotted the first and last minimoon 12 years ago. The asteroid, named 2006 RH120, was about six to ten feet in length, and entered Earth’s orbit every 20 years or so before returning to its path around the sun.

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