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Technology NASA explains why its mission to 'touch' the sun is basically insane

08:05  09 august  2018
08:05  09 august  2018 Source:   cnet.com

Here’s what NASA’s Opportunity rover saw as it was swallowed up by the Martian dust storm

  Here’s what NASA’s Opportunity rover saw as it was swallowed up by the Martian dust storm Things are not looking great for NASA's Opportunity rover on Mars. The rover, which is nearing its 15th year, is currently stuck in a fierce dust storm that is blanketing the planet, and it's unclear whether it will make it out unscathed. The friendly little robot radioed back to its handlers on Earth on Sunday morning, letting them know that it still had enough power to communicate, but those transmissions have since ceased. © Provided by BGR In a new update from NASA, the Opportunity team notes that a more recent attempt to contact Opportunity has been met with only silence.

In fact, NASA stated its goal with the Parker Solar Probe is to " touch " the sun . I have some issues: First, there's nothing surprising about it. Second, the answer is pretty self- explanatory . The sun is very hot, people!

NASA is going to send a spacecraft to the Sun . That, on its own, is pretty wild, but the fact that scientists plan on the Parker Solar Probe spending seven years orbiting our star, constantly gathering data and relaying observations back to Earth, is a whole other level of insane . Now, NASA has taken.

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is launching this weekend on Aug. 11. Its destination: the sun.

In fact, NASA stated its goal with the Parker Solar Probe is to "touch" the sun. It's sending a spacecraft "the size of a small car" directly into the sun's atmosphere.

And in preparation for that launch NASA has released a video titled "It's Surprisingly Hard to Go to the Sun".

a star filled sky © CNET I have some issues: First, there's nothing surprising about it. Second, the answer is pretty self-explanatory. The sun is very hot, people! This isn't rocket science.

The video obviously goes into more detail than that. Incredibly it takes 55 times the amount of energy as it would take to go to Mars. Mainly because Earth moves very fast -- 67,000 miles per hour -- and is always sideways relative to the sun. Any object travelling to the sun has to cancel that motion.

But NASA is going ahead with the project regardless. In its final orbits NASA estimates the Parker Solar Probe will hit speeds of 430,000 miles per hour, which is the fastest any man-made object will have ever travelled to that point. Unreal.

NASA's mission to 'touch the sun' beams back first images .
Sun not included.

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