Technology: Google wants to make encryption easier for everyone - PressFrom - US
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Technology Google wants to make encryption easier for everyone

12:20  13 january  2017
12:20  13 january  2017 Source:   engadget.com

Google's self-driving cars master tricky three-point turns

  Google's self-driving cars master tricky three-point turns With supercomputers for brains and perfect 360-degree vision, one would imagine it would be fairly simple for an autonomous vehicle to pass the time-honored driver's ed test of performing a three-point turn. But according to Google's self-driving car project October report, that is one of the many things that's easier said than done for a robot vehicle. While a human driver can estimate the best angle and distance, the amount of data and information the autonomous vehicle has can actually be a drawback. "Our challenge is to teach our self-driving cars to choose the option that's not only the quickest, but one that feels natural to passengers," the report says. So, even though some turns would be easier done in reverse, for example, people prefer to travel moving forward, where they can see what's happening. "So we've taught our cars to mimic these human patterns, favoring wider forward arcs, rather than a series of short movements back and forth." In order to get all these turns right, Google's vehicles are doing a lot more turns than most drivers will probably ever practice before hitting the road – about 1,000 every week. And, despite some hang ups with California's autonomous vehicle regulations, Google's vehicles have driven over 2.2 million autonomous miles in Washington State, California, Arizona and Texas to date.

Portland wants to get driverless cars on its roads this year. According to Google 's Ryan Hurst and Gary Belvin, most people have a hard time using encryption methods like PGP or even encrypted messaging apps because they require users to manually verify the recipients' account.

Google ’s Security and Privacy Engineering team have noticed a few problems with building a generic yet secure way of exchanging public encryption In other words, Key Transparency is a directory that will not only verify that your messages are properly secured, but will also make it simpler for

  Google wants to make encryption easier for everyone © Provided by Engadget As more and more of our daily lives take place online, more and more sites, apps and services are increasing their encryption to keep users' data safe and secure. However, being the web monolith that it is, Google's Security and Privacy Engineering team have noticed a few problems with building a generic yet secure way of exchanging public encryption keys that could work across a range of applications. To fix this, Google has announced the Key Transparency initiative to create a simple way to establish secure connections even through untrusted servers.

According to Google's Ryan Hurst and Gary Belvin, most people have a hard time using encryption methods like PGP or even encrypted messaging apps because they require users to manually verify the recipients' account. The idea behind Key Transparency is to build out a framework that regular people can use to verify that someone's online persona matches their public key. In other words, Key Transparency is a directory that will not only verify that your messages are properly secured, but will also make it simpler for developers to audit that account data and build simpler security features.

The project is in its first open source release, but Google hopes to keep iterating based on feedback from the security community. You can follow the developments over on Github or at KeyTransparency.org.

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