•   
  •   
  •   

Technology SpaceX booked 'world's first' private passenger for a BFR Moon trip

04:25  14 september  2018
04:25  14 september  2018 Source:   engadget.com

Starting this weekend, SpaceX is about to land a whole lot more rockets

  Starting this weekend, SpaceX is about to land a whole lot more rockets The Block 5 is the only Falcon 9 the company will fly from now onThe Falcon 9 Block 5 is optimized for rapid reusability, according to the company. It boasts a number of improvements that make the vehicle easier to land after launch, as well as upgrades that minimize the amount of refurbishment the rocket needs between flights. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk claims that the Block 5s won’t need any major refurbishment for the first 10 flights or so, and could potentially fly up to 100 times before being retired. The company’s ultimate goal is to turn these vehicles around in just 24 hours after landing.

We haven't seen SpaceX's BFR -- the rocket that it hopes will enable trips around the world, to the Moon, and, eventually, to Mars -- actually take flight yet, but the company says it has already booked a private passenger for a trip around the Moon. No one has been there since Apollo missions ended in the 70s, but now, in a "world's first" SpaceX is apparently taking reservations. Details like who is going and "why" are to be revealed during a livestream on Monday September 17th at 9 PM ET.

SpaceX launches record-setting satellite with block 5 Falcon 9 rocket

  SpaceX launches record-setting satellite with block 5 Falcon 9 rocket Elon Musk's rocket company launched the final iteration of its workhorse rocket carrying the biggest communications satellite ever.SpaceX launched just its second "block 5" Falcon 9 rocket in the darkness from Florida early Sunday local time, and it was loaded with the heaviest commercial communications satellite ever built.

SpaceX

NASA explores product endorsements and rocket naming rights .
NASA's new leader is gung-ho on privatizing spaceflight, and that could lead to some new approaches to branding like it or not. Administrator Jim Bridenstine has unveiled a NASA Advisory Council committee that will explore the feasibility of commercializing the agency's operations in low Earth orbit to lower its costs while its eyes turn toward the Moon and Mars. Some of these plans could include product endorsements from astronauts and even selling the naming rights to rockets and other spacecraft. You could see an astronaut on a box of Wheaties, or a Red Bull mission to the Red Planet.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
This is interesting!