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Technology SpaceX booked 'world's first' private passenger for a BFR Moon trip

04:25  14 september  2018
04:25  14 september  2018 Source:   engadget.com

Elon Musk plans to launch a person around the moon in a giant new SpaceX rocket ship

  Elon Musk plans to launch a person around the moon in a giant new SpaceX rocket ship Elon Musk's aerospace company, SpaceX, plans to launch "the world's first private passenger" around the moon with its upcoming Big Falcon Rocket or BFR spacecraft.The company's announcement came Thursday night via Twitter, and it included a rendering of the spaceship that will make the voyage: the Big Falcon Rocket, or BFR.

We haven't seen SpaceX's BFR -- the rocket that it hopes will enable trips around the world, to the Moon, and, eventually, to Mars -- actually take flight yet, but the company says it has already booked a private passenger for a trip around the Moon. No one has been there since Apollo missions ended in the 70s, but now, in a "world's first" SpaceX is apparently taking reservations. Details like who is going and "why" are to be revealed during a livestream on Monday September 17th at 9 PM ET.

SpaceX plans to reveal the identity of its first Moon trip passenger on Monday

  SpaceX plans to reveal the identity of its first Moon trip passenger on Monday SpaceX has long been bullish on the idea of selling seats on its spacecraft to private citizens who are willing to pony up enough cash for a trip into space. The trip, which will take the person (or persons?) on a round-trip journey around Earth’s only natural satellite, will be made possible by SpaceX’s BFR. The ‘Big Falcon Rocket’ (or Big F*cking Rocket, depending on who you ask) isn’t anywhere close to actually getting off the ground today, so there are a whole lot of questions the company will need to answer when it makes the announcement.

SpaceX

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