Technology: NASA says Voyager 2 may be nearing interstellar space - PressFrom - US
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Technology NASA says Voyager 2 may be nearing interstellar space

22:25  06 october  2018
22:25  06 october  2018 Source:   cnet.com

New Horizons probe may have detected Solar System's hydrogen 'wall'

  New Horizons probe may have detected Solar System's hydrogen 'wall' Scientists have learned a bit about the edge of the Solar System from Voyager 1, but there hasn't been a lot of corroborating data without follow-up spacecraft. They appear to be getting a second chance, though. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has detected what appears to be a "wall" at the edge of the Solar System where interstellar hydrogen gathers as it collides with the solar wind -- in other words, the very edge of the Sun's influence.

NASA 's Voyager 2 probe, currently on a journey toward interstellar space , has detected an increase in cosmic rays that originate outside our solar system. The fact that Voyager 2 may be approaching the heliopause six years after Voyager 1 is also relevant, because the heliopause moves inward and

Voyager 1 could soon welcome its twin to the space outside our solar system. NASA 's Voyager 2 spacecraft launched way back in 1977 when bell bottoms and disco were in style. All these decades later, the probe appears to be nearing a massive milestone: an entry into interstellar space .

a satellite in space: voyager1artistsconcept© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. voyager1artistsconcept

NASA'sVoyager 2 spacecraft launched way back in 1977 when bell bottoms and disco were in style. All these decades later, the probe appears to be nearing a massive milestone: an entry into interstellar space.

Voyager 2 has been traveling through the heliosheath, the outermost layer of the heliosphere, for over a decade. NASA describes the heliosphere as a "vast bubble around the Sun and the planets dominated by solar material and magnetic fields."

The probe is currently just under 11 billion miles (about 17.7 billion kilometers) from Earth.

NASA announced on Friday that data from Voyager 2 shows an increase in the rate of cosmic rays from outside our solar system hitting the probe. The agency's Voyager 1 spacecraft had a similar experience in 2012 shortly before leaving the solar system.

NASA apps take you to space with VR and selfies

  NASA apps take you to space with VR and selfies NASA's apps tend to be all-business, but it's livening things up this time around -- the administration has released two apps that go beyond dry scientific explanations. And then there's... NASA Selfies. Yes, it's trying that hard to be trendy. The Android and iOS app has you staging self-portraits in front of well-known cosmic landmarks, such as the Orion Nebula or the stellar wind "bow shock" that gives Zeta Ophiuchi its distinct flair. It's cute, but something tells us you'll use it once or twice before you return to Instagram filters and Snapchat Lenses.

NASA ’s Voyager 2 probe, launched in 1977, is on a journey toward interstellar space . NASA says the spacecraft has now detected an increase in cosmic rays – fast-moving particles that originate outside our solar system – which suggests that the spacecraft might be close to crossing into interstellar

NASA 's Voyager 2 probe, currently on a journey toward interstellar space , has detected an increase in cosmic rays that originate outside our solar system. The fact that Voyager 2 may be approaching the heliopause six years after Voyager 1 is also relevant, because the heliopause moves inward and

Voyager 1 is currently the only human-made object to enter interstellar space. NASA scientists aren't sure when Voyager 2 will join its twin by crossing the heliosphere boundary, an area known as the heliopause.

"We're going to learn a lot in the coming months, but we still don't know when we'll reach the heliopause. We're not there yet -- that's one thing I can say with confidence," says Voyager project scientist Ed Stone.

Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to visit Uranus and Neptune. Its adventures in the outer solar system led to the discovery of new moons around the gas giant planets. Despite the age of the probe, NASA hopes to continue to collect data from it until at least 2025.

a star in space: nasavoyagersillustration© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. nasavoyagersillustration

There could be hundreds of interstellar asteroids lurking in our solar system.
These asteroids will stick around for a long time, so scientists can take their time learning everything about them. A year ago, astronomers spotted something no one had ever seen before: an object visiting our solar system from somewhere else in the galaxy. The object, dubbed ‘Oumuamua, is long since gone, heading rapidly out of our solar system just as quickly as it came. But now that we know interstellar asteroids exist, scientists have been on the hunt for more. And according to a new study by Harvard researchers, there may be plenty to find.

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