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Technology This wacky-looking font can help you remember what you read

11:51  11 october  2018
11:51  11 october  2018 Source:   popsci.com

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A new font can help lodge information deeper in your brain, researchers say, but it's not magic - just The team distracted students for 15 minutes after they read about the animals, then quizzed them; the students remembered 87 percent of the pangerish facts, whose information had been tougher to read

With normal fonts " readers often glance over them and no memory trace is created," RMIT senior lecturer Janneke Blijlevens said in a statement. The font can be downloaded as a extension to Google's Chrome web browser or as a font from a website created for it by the RMIT.

a red and white sign: Sans Forgetica font sample© RMIT University Sans Forgetica font sample

Most fonts are designed for ease of use. Lora, which you’re reading right now, was chosen by the PopSci web team because it’s easy to read, and also free. Reviled for its “childish” look, Comic Sans is nonetheless considered one of the easiest fonts for dyslexics to read. Word processing darlings, from the sleek Arial to the nostalgic Times New Roman, strive to be similarly practical.

It was unusual, then, when researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia approached typography professor Stephen Banham about crafting a font that was harder to read. “[It] was unlike any other typeface I have designed,” he wrote in an email. He broke each letter; the S looks like someone dragged an eraser down its midline, the G like a roughed-up zebra, the W like a broken dinner plate. And he tilted each letter—and with it, therefore each word or line or paragraph—on an axis, setting the misfit runes deliberately askew.

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A new font can help lodge information deeper in your brain, researchers say, but it's not magic - just The team distracted students for 15 minutes after they read about the animals, then quizzed them; the students remembered 87 percent of the pangerish facts, whose information had been tougher to read

Australian researchers say their new font , called Sans Forgetica, could be the tool to help people retain information. The typeface, which slants to the side and has gaps in the middle, is not easy on the eyes. But according to the team at RMIT University in Australia who conceived Sans Forgetica, it has the

Banham’s goal, however, wasn’t to confuse. Quite the opposite. In breaking the fundamental rules of typography, Banham and his colleagues say they’ve found a simple way to improve a reader’s memory. That’s why they named their font, released this month and available for free download online, Sans Forgetica.

Learning can feel a bit like Goldilocks pursuing the optimal porridge. When things are too hard, says Carnegie Mellon University psychologist Daniel Oppenheimer, people feel inclined to quit. (If mastery is so clearly out of reach, why even bother?) But when the tasks at hand are too easy, people end up bored. In psychology, “just right” is called “desirable difficulty.”

Once you have the words for it, desirable difficulty appears far outside the bounds of the classroom. Roundabouts, for example, have been shown to improve street safety, because they require drivers to think harder about their decisions than a four-way stop might necessitate. And while they’re best known for ushering in an unprecedented, app-based era of convenience, user experience designers will selectively make things more difficult (or, in the professional parlance, “disfluent”) to ensure they have the user’s attention.

Scientists create a new font designed to boost your memory

  Scientists create a new font designed to boost your memory Helvetica is so 2011. It's all about Sans Forgetica now.It would have been handy to have a font specifically designed to help me alleviate the most pressing of those issues -- the fact that, going into a test, I'd have to write my lab notes over and over again, just to help me remember them.

It’s how they read . Good reading habits not only help you read more but help you read better. When I read a book, I am looking for the essential elements in the work that can be used to create Having a catalogue of everything you learn from reading creates a priceless resource which can be

Three Parts:Setting Yourself Up to Read and Remember Becoming a Critical Reader Become a critical reader by knowing your purpose for reading the material, creating mental pictures of These are all good ways to help yourself remember what you 've read . The key here is to make reading an

Designers and psychologists have been theorizing ways to manipulate fonts to improve recall for years. Oppenheimer, who is not a part of the Sans Forgetica project, did some of the earliest research on this idea. In 2011, his team published what was effectively a proof of concept. It showed, across two different testing environments, that participants were better able to recall a passage of text when it was printed in a more comprehensible font. Other papers, including a 2012 study on disfluency in typography cited heavily by the Sans Forgetica team, emerged in the intervening years.

But the Sans Forgetica project is fundamentally different. Banham and his collaborators weren’t just gathering more data, they were refining a new—and very usable—memory-boosting font of their own.

“We designed three different fonts that each consecutively broke more design principles,” writes Janneke Blijlevens, one of the Sans Forgetica researchers and an expert in consumer design. “The first font only had gaps, breaking the principle of closure. The second font had gaps and had a backslant… The third had gaps, a backslant, and was asymmetrical. We found that the second broke just enough design principles to be desirably difficult; this then became what is now known as Sans Forgetica.”

Scientists create a new font designed to boost your memory

  Scientists create a new font designed to boost your memory Helvetica is so 2011. It's all about Sans Forgetica now.It would have been handy to have a font specifically designed to help me alleviate the most pressing of those issues -- the fact that, going into a test, I'd have to write my lab notes over and over again, just to help me remember them.

We fail to remember a lot of the stuff we read because it’s not building on any existing knowledge. This is what you build on. So when you read and connect things to the core knowledge, not only If you ’re looking to acquire worldly wisdom, time is your best filter. It makes sense to focus on learning

Remembering What You Read Some people prefer to highlight or underline what they consider to be key words in the sentences they read . So far the best way to remember things is to teach them. Try telling somebody about what you are reading . Unless the information is clear to you , you will not be

Early research has hinted at Sans Forgetica’s promise. Research papers have yet to be published, but The Guardian reports that recall was 7 percent higher with Sans Forgetica than Arial, rising from 50 to 57 percent. But many questions remain unanswered.

For one, researchers aren’t yet sure how universal “desirable difficulty” really is. What may be perfect challenge for one individual could easily stymie another. Since publishing his own research on memory and fonts in 2011, Oppenheimer says, “there have been several replications of the finding, and several people who have not found the finding.” The results seem to differ with the study population. Whether Sans Forgetica has overcome this challenge can only be determined with widespread use.

Similarly, what’s challenging today may not be challenging tomorrow. “As people become more used to Sans Forgetica it may become less desirably difficult,” writes Joanne Laban, who worked on the project.

Still, Oppenheimer believes there’s reason to remain optimistic. “I always thought with our original study that there were really great opportunities for intervention,” he says. Plus, if it works, “it’s basically cost-free."

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