Technology: Tiny NASA spacecraft snaps its first view of Mars - - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyTiny NASA spacecraft snaps its first view of Mars

03:30  23 october  2018
03:30  23 october  2018 Source:   cnet.com

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Tiny , Mars -bound satellite snaps its first image of Earth and the Moon. Channel 9 News delivers the latest headlines news and information on the latest top NASA 's longest-running Mars mission has captured its first view of Phobos. The spacecraft 's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS).

One of NASA 's twin MarCO CubeSat spacecraft took a landmark image of Mars as it heads ever closer to the Red Planet. The Mars shot was a test of the CubeSat's imaging abilities. The planet was at a distance of about 8 million miles (12.8 million kilometers) when MarCO-B snapped the picture.

Tiny NASA spacecraft snaps its first view of Mars© NASA/JPL-Caltech A artist's rendering of the MarCO spacecraft.

A red pinpoint marks a big milestone for a small spacecraft.

One of NASA's twin MarCO CubeSat spacecraft took a landmark image of Mars as it heads ever closer to the Red Planet. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shared the image on Monday, though the CubeSat originally captured the scene on Oct. 2, three weeks ago.

Each CubeSat is about the size of a briefcase. MarCO-A is nicknamed "EVE" while MarCO-B is known as "Wall-E." The twins launched in May as part of NASA's Mars Insight mission.

These are the first CubeSats to venture into deep space, and NASA is curious to see if the low-cost devices will survive the rigorous journey to Mars.

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One of NASA 's two Mars Cube One cubesats, which launched toward the Red Planet along with the agency's A tiny satellite on its way to Mars has opened its eyes and captured a view of home. But none of these tiny craft had ever ventured into deep space until the twin MarCO spacecraft did.

NASA 's Mars lander, called InSight, landed on the red planet and sent its first image of the Mars surface. In the final moments of the spacecraft ’s descent, the mission control room at NASA 's Jet Propulsion Laboratory was silent as updates on InSight's status blared over the PA system: "Altitude

Tiny NASA spacecraft snaps its first view of Mars© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. cubesatmars NASA intends to test the spacecraft to see if they can be used as a communications relay during the Insight lander's planned late-November descent to the surface of Mars.

The Mars shot was a test of the CubeSat's imaging abilities. The planet was at a distance of about 8 million miles (12.8 million kilometers) when MarCO-B snapped the picture.

"The cruise phase of the mission is always difficult, so you take all the small wins when they come. Finally seeing the planet is definitely a big win for the team," said MarCO mission manager Cody Colley.

MarCO-B got a look at Earth and the moon in mid-May.

NASA's Mars lander takes selfie from above with robotic arm.
NASA's new Mars lander has taken a selfie from above, using a camera on its long robotic arm. The InSight lander snapped a series of pictures that NASA turned into a stunning mosaic released Tuesday. InSight landed on Mars on Nov. 26. In the two weeks since, scientists are thrilled to find the area in front of the spacecraft pretty much free of rocks, hills and holes. That should make it a safe place for InSight's two geology experiments, which will be moved to the ground in the coming weeks. Lead scientist Bruce Banerdt of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory says the red sandy expanse might seem "pretty plain" — if it weren't on Mars.

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