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TechnologyThe Mars InSight robot just placed its first instrument on Mars’ surface

07:30  23 december  2018
07:30  23 december  2018 Source:   bgr.com

NASA set to broadcast its first Mars landing in six years

NASA set to broadcast its first Mars landing in six years It's been a while since we've sat down in front of the TV to watch a good ol' Mars landing.

NASA's Mars InSight mission is moving along at a rapid pace. After landing on the planet just a few weeks ago, InSight has spent its days There were many factors at work in determining the timetable between landing and instrument deployment, and NASA is the first to admit that it got mighty lucky

NASA’s Mars InSight mission is moving along at a rapid pace. After landing on the planet just a few weeks ago, InSight has spent its days observing its new living space and sending NASA’s InSight team has been practicing the tricky task of placing the robot ’s sensitive instruments on the surface .

The Mars InSight robot just placed its first instrument on Mars’ surface© Provided by Penske Media Corporation insight

NASA’s Mars InSight mission is moving along at a rapid pace. After landing on the planet just a few weeks ago, InSight has spent its days observing its new living space and sending back photos of the ground surrounding it.

NASA’s InSight team has been practicing the tricky task of placing the robot’s sensitive instruments on the surface. Now, with a couple of years of observation and data gathering ahead of it, the bot has successfully deployed the first of its sensor suite, and NASA is very happy with how well things are progressing.

Mars getting 1st US visitor in years, a 3-legged geologist

Mars getting 1st US visitor in years, a 3-legged geologist Mars is about to get its first U.S. visitor in years. NASA's three-legged, one-armed geologist known as InSight makes its grand entrance through the rose-tinted Martian skies on Monday. It will be the first American spacecraft to land since the Curiosity rover six years ago and the first dedicated to exploring underground. NASA is going with a tried-and-true method to get this mechanical miner to the surface of the red planet. Engine firings will slow its final descent and the spacecraft will plop down on its rigid legs, mimicking the landings of earlier successful missions.

The InSight lander will study the interior of Mars and listen for Marsquakes. The spacecraft's robotic arm will lift the heat probe's support structure, providing a better look at the instrument that has With InSight 's meteorological sensors, scientists get their first measurements of wind and dust interacting

NASA's InSight Mars lander acquired this image of the area in front of the lander using its The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter used its HiRISE camera to obtain this view of an area with unusual texture It will take two to three months for the robotic arm to place the mission's instruments on the surface .

“NASA’s InSight lander has deployed its first instrument onto the surface of Mars, completing a major mission milestone,” NASA writes in a new blog post. “New images from the lander show the seismometer on the ground, its copper-colored covering faintly illuminated in the Martian dusk. It looks as if all is calm and all is bright for InSight, heading into the end of the year.”

There were many factors at work in determining the timetable between landing and instrument deployment, and NASA is the first to admit that it got mighty lucky with InSight’s landing site. One major concern was that rocks or uneven ground would hamper instrument placement, requiring extensive planning before the sensors could be placed on the planet.

However, NASA’s chosen landing site ended up being even more perfect than the InSight team could have hoped. The ground was virtually free of anything larger than a pebble and the robot’s handlers have plenty of space to work with, allowing things to move on faster than initially planned.

“InSight’s timetable of activities on Mars has gone better than we hoped,” InSight Project Manager Tom Hoffman said in a statement. “Getting the seismometer safely on the ground is an awesome Christmas present.”

Mars 'mole' put on planet's surface.
The US space agency's InSight mission positions the second of its surface instruments on Mars. Known as HP3, the heat-flow probe was picked up off the deck of the lander with a robot arm and placed next to the SEIS seismometer package, which was deployed in December. Together with an onboard radio experiment, these sensor systems will be used to investigate the interior of the planet, to understand its present-day activity and how the sub-surface rocks are layered. © BBC Map https://twitter.

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