Technology: Scientists prove bees can do math - Bees love to count and master the concept of Zero - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyScientists prove bees can do math

16:15  03 march  2019
16:15  03 march  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

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However, scientists have discovered that some math skills can be demonstrated by bees . In the February issue of Science Advances, researchers from Australia and France describe how honeybees can use colors and symbolic representations to calculate addition or subtraction.

Bees aren’t the stripey idiots we all thought – as scientists have shown that they can add and subtract, doing simple sums with 75% accuracy. This ground-breaking study just proved bees are better at math than niggers, and that says a lot considering niglets can more or less speak our language and

Numerical skills – being able to use symbols or labeling to perform arithmetic functions, such as adding and subtracting – has been thought to be accessible only to a limited number of nonhuman species. (Chimpanzees, pigeons, spiders and parrots have demonstrated such abilities). However, scientists have discovered that some math skills can be demonstrated by bees.

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Bees aren’t the stripey idiots we all thought – as scientists have shown that they can add and subtract, doing simple sums with 75% accuracy. This ground-breaking study just proved bees are better at math than niggers, and that says a lot considering niglets can more or less speak our language and.

Yet another reason to save the bee population: they might be able to do your homework. Buzz60's Tony Spitz has the bee -tails. Buzz60.

In the February issue of Science Advances, researchers from Australia and France describe how honeybees can use colors and symbolic representations to calculate addition or subtraction.

In the experiment, free-flying honeybees (Apis mellifera) entered a maze where they could obtain a reward (sugar) or punishment (quinine), depending upon whether they chose a correct or incorrect response to color stimulus mandating that they choose a certain number of elements (shapes of diamonds, circles, triangles or squares) that was greater or lesser. By showing the bees yellow or blue as cues, they were prompted to subtract or add to go to the proper site to obtain the reward, through their ability to calculate visual representations of a number to obtain the desired outcome.

Honeybees can solve basic math problems. Really.

Honeybees can solve basic math problems. Really. Bees have teeny-tiny brains. Scientists aren’t done figuring out what they can do with them. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The honeybee’s brain has about 1 million neurons. While that may sound like a lot, it’s pretty tiny compared to other species. A mouse brain has about 75 million neurons. Humans have 100 billion, or 100,000 times more. Yet even with this small hardware, the bee brain is capable of accomplishing many complex tasks. One of them is basic math.

Bees don't just buzz around and make honey; they also do math problems in their free time that would stump the average 4-year-old. A couple of decades ago, scientists thought that such higher-level processing was limited to human and some other primate brains.

Does math give you trouble? Here's some encouragement: Despite their miniature brains, a new study says honeybees can learn basic arithmetic. Training bees to do your homework won't be an option, but here's how the scientists helped them learn. In this study, 14 free-flying honeybees were taught

The bees were then tested again, without rewards.

The experiment was limited to number quantities between 1 and 5.

The report's authors (Scarlett Howard, Aurore Avarguès-Weber, Jair Garcia, Andrew Greentree and Adrian Dye) write, "It would be valuable to examine bee performance on large number quantities to determine whether they could use approximation or exact arithmetic to solve similar large-number arithmetic problems."

The authors add, "Each individual bee appears to learn differently, possibly due to the random presentation of stimuli and by individual differences in cognitive abilities." In other words, some bees are brighter than others.

For more on the experiment go to Science Advances.

Read More

Beehives in Texas attacked, set on fire, killing half a million bees, officials say.
Dozens of beehives were attacked and set on fire in Texas over the weekend, an act “beyond comprehension” that killed an estimated half a million bees, officials said. The beehives were discovered on Saturday morning scattered across the bee yard, the Brazoria County Beekeepers Association (BCBA) wrote on Facebook. Several hives appeared ashen-black and one brood frame floated in the water nearby with bees still caring for the eggs. “It’s bad enough to think in today’s world this would happen but dumping them over and then setting fire to them is beyond comprehension,” the BCBA said in the post.

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