Technology: NASA snaps supersonic shockwaves interacting in flight: Wowza! - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

TechnologyNASA snaps supersonic shockwaves interacting in flight: Wowza!

00:15  07 march  2019
00:15  07 march  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Russian supersonic bomber crashes in Murmansk region

Russian supersonic bomber crashes in Murmansk region A Tupolev Tu-22M3 supersonic strike bomber has crashed in Russia's northwestern region of Murmansk. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The accident occurred at 1:40 p.m. (5:40 a.m. ET) as the long-range bomber was attempting to land, according to Russian state news agency TASS, citing law enforcement officials. The warplane had four crew members onboard: the commander, co-pilot, navigator and operator.

NASA tests equipment for the schlieren imaging of future supersonic aircraft through the second series of Using the sun as a background allows researchers to observe the shockwaves coming off supersonic LBFD will fly at high altitudes, and in order to be able to capture these images in flight

Toggle navigation. Search NASA .gov. Flight . Solar System and Beyond. Education.

NASA snaps supersonic shockwaves interacting in flight: Wowza!© CNET

NASA captured the " first air-to-air images of the interaction of shockwaves from two supersonic aircraft flying in formation."

NASA wants to make a supersonic airplane that rumbles instead of booms. To do that, the agency needs to understand the intimate details of how supersonic shockwaves work. Some mind-bending new images show for the first time how shockwaves interact in flight.

The images look unreal. They show two US Air Force T-38 training jets with lines radiating off to their sides and plumes extending out behind. This gives us a gorgeous visualization of the shockwaves that are heard on the ground as loud sonic booms.

Curiosity snaps a selfie before heading off to new adventures

Curiosity snaps a selfie before heading off to new adventures NASA may be on the edge of its seat as it waits to see if its aging Opportunity rover will wake back up from its extended downtime, but it's not the only piece of scientific hardware on the Red Planet. The trusty Curiosity rover is still going strong, and after spending over a year at its current location on the Vera Rubin Ridge, it’s ready to move on. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

NASA Flights Advance Celestial Schlieren Imagery for Supersonic Aircraft. Getting such an image in flight is incredibly difficult because the image is taken from an aircraft flying at regular subsonic speed of an aircraft flying at supersonic speed.

In physics, a shock wave (also spelled shockwave ), or shock, is a type of propagating disturbance that moves faster than the local speed of sound in the medium. Like an ordinary wave, a shock wave carries energy and can propagate through a medium but is characterized by an abrupt

NASA says these are "the first-ever images of the interaction of shockwaves from two supersonic aircraft in flight." The achievement came about during the latest phase of the agency's Air-to-Air Background Oriented Schlieren (AirBOS) flights at the Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California.

NASA's advanced air-to-air imaging system required some fancy flying to make it all work. The T-38s traveled in formation about 30 feet (9 meters) apart. A NASA B-200 King Air plane carried the camera system as the T-38s flew below it at supersonic speeds. The timing had to be perfect, and it was.

NASA snaps supersonic shockwaves interacting in flight: Wowza!© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. nasashockwaves2

"What's interesting is, if you look at the rear T-38, you see these shocks kind of interact in a curve," said research engineer Neal Smith. "This is because the trailing T-38 is flying in the wake of the leading aircraft, so the shocks are going to be shaped differently."

The data and the imaging system will come in handy as NASA continues work on the X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology X-Plane. The agency hopes to make supersonic flight over land possible by removing the big, disturbing boom of current aircraft designs.

NASA's new rocket won't be ready for moon shot next year.
NASA's top official says the space agency's new rocket won't be ready for a launch next year to the moon. Administrator Jim Bridenstine told a Senate committee Wednesday that he's considering launching the Orion capsule atop a commercial rocket instead. But he says that will require more money and a more complicated mission plan.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 84
This is interesting!