Technology: What's inside a Martian meteorite: X-ray study on rare fragment could reveal new clues on the red planet's watery past - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyWhat's inside a Martian meteorite: X-ray study on rare fragment could reveal new clues on the red planet's watery past

01:40  16 march  2019
01:40  16 march  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Heart-shaped meteorite goes on auction for Valentine's Day

Heart-shaped meteorite goes on auction for Valentine's Day You might want to reconsider your Valentine's Day plans this year: A superior gift is about to go on sale, and it came all the way from space. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); British auction house Christie's is soon to open online bidding on a heart-shaped meteorite, one that plummeted to Earth over Siberia in 1947. According to Christie's, the meteorite once belonged to a colossal mass of iron that split from the asteroid belt 320 million years ago.

A Martian meteorite is a rock that formed on the planet Mars and was then ejected from Mars by the impact of an asteroid or comet, and finally landed on the Earth.

In a twist for Martian meteorite studies , it turns out their mineral composition may show that the Red Planet was wet and possibly habitable in the past . The research team ran shock-compression experiments to simulate the conditions that happen when a Martian sample is ejected from Mars into

What's inside a Martian meteorite: X-ray study on rare fragment could reveal new clues on the red planet's watery past© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited 'Black Beauty', pictured above, is a 2 billion-year-old meteorite that scientists say was blasted to Earth from Mars by a large impact event

Army researchers are using X-Rays to get a look inside some of the world's most precious artifacts from space, including one of the Earth's oldest Martian meteorites dubbed, 'Black Beauty.'

According to the Army Research Laboratory, Black Beauty – a 2 billion-year-old meteorite that scientists say was blasted to Earth from Mars by a large impact event – is among the space specimens to be examined in a joint program with NASA.

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A meteorite may have struck western Cuba, National Weather Service says The explosion reported in Viñales, Cuba, is not confirmed to be from a meteorite, but the government is investigating.

Researchers can study these meteorites , or they can study data from the surface of the planet , as recorded by orbiters, landers, and rovers. These Martian meteorites may actually be much older than Dr. Lapen and his colleagues report, says Audrey Bouvier, Canada Research Chair in Planetary

What ’ s more, these features seem to have been pressed into the Mars rock before it was hurled off While Mars rovers, landers and satellites are hunting for life-friendly conditions on the Red Planet Martian meteorite clues of the past . The new study is years in the making and it comes 18 years

Using CT scans, researchers say they're able to glean new insights into the inner workings of the objects, rendering 3-D, high resolution images which NASA calls a potential 'goldmine' for further research.

'NASA can ultimately use some of this information to further their understanding for their next mission to Mars,' said Dr. Jennifer Sietins, an Army materials engineer.

'What's unique about Black Beauty is that it's one of the oldest Martian meteorites that has been discovered on Earth and it's been proven to have some evidence of water.

'That's what makes it so special.'

The collaboration between NASA and the Army's research laboratory was born out of project that analyzed moon samples from NASA's Apollo 16 mission and employs technology that is already being used to analyze the micro-structure of different materials.

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The relatively rare iron meteorites and also the pallasites presumably represent the disaggregated cores of former What ' s in a name? In the late 1970 s scientists came to realize that three odd groups of Although most meteorites must fall in the ocean, there can be no doubt that Martian meteorites

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists are examining fragments of a Martian meteorite to try to establish when water was freely flowing on the red planet . Mars rover scientists have launched a new long-term study on the Martian atmosphere with the Alpha Particle X - ray Spectrometer, an instrument that was

NASA says the project has already yielded crucial information and upended previous understanding of the way some materials work.

What's inside a Martian meteorite: X-ray study on rare fragment could reveal new clues on the red planet's watery past© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Joint program between NASA and the U.S. Army is taking a closer look into some of the world's rarest space specimens

'This partnership we've been developing—this collaboration with the Army Research Lab in these new measurements of new things—has been extraordinary,' said Dr. James Garvin, chief scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

'We've already discovered things that were against what was thought with the existing.

'Space is a big place and there's a lot of work to be done.'

According to the International Meteorical Society, of the 61,000 meteors found on Earth, only 224 of them have been identified as coming from Mars, making them among the most rare specimens.

The two parties say they plan on publishing two journal articles later this year about their discoveries analyzing both lunar and martian rocks.

'We are all discoverers and that is what we have been doing with the U.S. Army,' Garvin said. 'The meteorites have an amazing story to tell.'

Spacecraft Discovers Hints of Groundwater Under the Surface of Mars.
The European Mars Express spacecraft found signs that the Red Planet used to have planetwide groundwater reserves. For decades if not centuries, we wondered whether Mars had water. Now, after a string of robotic expeditions to the Red Planet, we know the answer: It definitely used to. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); All of the traces of water we’ve discovered, however, have been on the planet’s surface.

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