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TechnologyJapan creates first artificial crater on asteroid

16:50  25 april  2019
16:50  25 april  2019 Source:   msn.com

Japan’s asteroid probe left a big dark patch when it touched Ryugu

Japan’s asteroid probe left a big dark patch when it touched Ryugu Japan's space agency JAXA is still celebrating the success of its first attempt to collect a sample of the asteroid Ryugu using the Hayabusa2 spacecraft, and it seems the asteroid itself is now left with a mark to prove it. Pocket $150 After Spending $500 Learn More Ad Wise Bread In a new set of images released by JAXA we can see Ryugu is now painted with a large dark blob that now graces its dusty white surface. The change is due to dust that was kicked up from beneath the surface when the spacecraft fired its projectile, causing a cloud of debris.

Japan 's Hayabusa2 probe deployed a heavy copper plate toward the asteroid Ryugu last night (April 4), in an effort to create an artificial crater . Mission team members are now working to confirm that a detectable crater was generated. A Japanese spacecraft deployed a heavy, explosive-packed

Japan ’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft is nearing its next duty: Creating an artificial crater on the surface of asteroid Ryugu. The intent is to expose a fresh surface by the impactor. Asteroid material excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the

Japan creates first artificial crater on asteroid© Handout Japan's Hayabusa2 mission aims to shed light on how the solar system evolved

Japanese scientists have succeeded in creating what they called the first-ever artificial crater on an asteroid, a step towards shedding light on how the solar system evolved, the country's space agency said Thursday.

The announcement comes after the Hayabusa2 probe fired an explosive device at the Ryugu asteroid early this month to blast a crater in the surface and scoop up material, aiming to reveal more about the origins of life on Earth.

Yuichi Tsuda, Hayabusa2 project manager at the Japanese space agency (JAXA), told reporters they confirmed the crater from images captured by the probe located 1,700 metres (5,500 feet) from the asteroid's surface.

Watch Japan’s asteroid probe fire a bullet into a space rock

Watch Japan’s asteroid probe fire a bullet into a space rock It was just a couple of weeks ago that the Japan space program, JAXA, announced that its Hayabusa2 probe had successfully completed a maneuver never before attempted in space. The spacecraft dipped down, close to the surface of the asteroid known as Ryugu, fired a projectile at its surface, snatched some sample material, and then gently drifted back into its original position. The maneuver was complex and risky, but Hayabusa2 pulled it off, and now we actually have video of how the entire thing played out.

Japan ’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft has completed yet another intense mission: It used an explosive to blast a crater in the surface of the asteroid Ryugu. On Thursday, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Hayabusa2 deployed its Small Carry-On Impactor Operation (SCI) to create an artificial

Japan 's space probe operating on an asteroid some 340 million kilometers from Earth is preparing to study the asteroid 's interior by creating an artificial impact crater . A senior official described the operation as the first attempt at such a difficult task, as the probe could be damaged from debris and

"Creating an artificial crater with an impactor and observing it in detail afterwards is a world-first attempt," Tsuda said.

"This is a big success."

NASA's Deep Impact probe succeeded in creating an artificial crater on a comet in 2005, but only for observation purposes.

Masahiko Arakawa, a Kobe University professor involved in the project, said it was "the best day of his life".

"We can see such a big hole a lot more clearly than expected," he said, adding the images showed a crater 10 metres in diameter.

JAXA scientists had previously predicted that the crater could be as large as 10 metres in diameter if the surface was sandy, or three metres if rocky.

"The surface is filled with boulders but yet we created a crater this big. This could mean there's a scientific mechanism we don't know or something special about Ryugu's materials," the professor said.

Japan to make crater on asteroid to get samples from inside

Japan to make crater on asteroid to get samples from inside Japan's space agency says its Hayabusa2 spacecraft will follow up last month's touchdown on a distant asteroid with another risky mission _ to drop an explosive to make a crater and collect underground samples to get possible clues to the origin of the solar system. 

A Japanese probe began descending towards an asteroid on Thursday on a mission to blast a The camera should be able to transmit those images, but it is unclear when the first confirmation of the NASA's Deep Impact project succeeded in creating an artificial crater on a comet in 2005, but only

Japan 's space probe operating on an asteroid some 340 million kilometers from Earth is preparing to study the asteroid 's interior by creating an artificial The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA, announced on Monday that the Hayabusa2 probe will attempt to create the crater on the

The aim of blasting the crater on Ryugu is to throw up "fresh" material from under the asteroid's surface that could shed light on the early stages of the solar system.

The asteroid is thought to contain relatively large amounts of organic matter and water from some 4.6 billion years ago when the solar system was born.

In February, Hayabusa2 touched down briefly on Ryugu and fired a bullet into the surface to puff up dust for collection, before blasting back to its holding position.

The mission, with a price tag of around 30 billion yen ($270 million), was launched in December 2014 and is scheduled to return to Earth with its samples in 2020.

Photos of Ryugu -- which means "Dragon Palace" in Japanese and refers to a castle at the bottom of the ocean in an ancient Japanese tale -- show the asteroid has a rough surface full of boulders.

Read More

Japan bombed an asteroid and now it's preparing to collect the debris.
The Japanese Space Agency's Hayabusa 2 shot a cannonball at Ryugu and is ready to scoop up some of the ejected rock.

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