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TechnologyNASA's Astrobee cube robot completes first hardware tests in space

10:00  19 may  2019
10:00  19 may  2019 Source:   engadget.com

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NASA ’ s First Astrobee Robot “Bumble” Starts Flying in Space . NASA astronaut Anne McClain performs the first series of tests of an Astrobee robot , Bumble, during a hardware checkout. To her right is the docking station that was installed in the Kibo module on the International Space Station on

On April 30, NASA astronaut Anne McClain unpacked the first Astrobee robot —named Bumble—in the Kibo module of the International Space Station and worked with Astrobee ’s team at NASA ’ s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley to complete an initial series of tests to verify that the

NASA's Astrobee cube robot completes first hardware tests in space

NASA just inched closer to having robots take care of spacecraft.

The agency recently completed its first hardware checkouts for Bumble (above), one of three Astrobee robots that will research automated caretaking aboard the International Space Station.

The bot won't float on its own until later in the spring, but it should be good to go -- including for automated recharging at its docking station, Kibo.

The robot and one of its companions, Honey, flew to the station on April 17th.

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Astrobee Completes Hardware Tests in Space . Kat Jones. Each robot has three payload bays, attachment points for which new hardware modules can be installed. Furthermore, Astrobee ’ s software is open-source, released by NASA to promote development and testing of new algorithms and

Washington: NASA has completed the first hardware test of a robot in space that would take care of the International Space Station (ISS) in the near future. The robot named Bumble is one of three Astrobee robots that will research automated caretaking aboard the ISS. Bumble, and another robot

When in service, the Astrobee robots will effectively become spaceborne Roombas -- they'll test how well robots can handle day-to-day maintenance and assist the crew.

Ideally, future robots will take care of this drudgery so that humans can focus on more important tasks like science experiments and exploration. This could help the eventual return to the Moon (not to mention trips to Mars) by reducing the necessary astronaut headcount, or at least reducing the stress for those astronauts who make the journey.

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