Technology: Maybe there ISN'T anyone out there! The number of planets that could support alien life is much smaller than we thought as scientists admit that more than HALF are shrouded in toxic gas - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

TechnologyMaybe there ISN'T anyone out there! The number of planets that could support alien life is much smaller than we thought as scientists admit that more than HALF are shrouded in toxic gas

22:40  12 june  2019
22:40  12 june  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

A new 'puffy' planet has been discovered in the Kepler-47 system

A new 'puffy' planet has been discovered in the Kepler-47 system Kepler-47 is a 3.5-billion-year-old star system about 3,340 light years away from Earth. 

Maybe there ISN'T anyone out there! The number of planets that could support alien life is much smaller than we thought as scientists admit that more than HALF are shrouded in toxic gas© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Scientists have admitted to a major mistake in their approach to how they search for aliens. It turns out that many of the planets that they thought were habitable, are actually 'dead planets' which are enveloped with a suffocating toxic gas Scientists have admitted to a major mistake in their approach in how they search for aliens and where they could potentially live.

It turns out that many of the planets that they thought were habitable, are actually 'dead planets' which are enveloped with a suffocating toxic gas.

Researchers, from the University of California, say our estimates of stars' habitable zones have been 'far too generous'.

'Oumuamua' might not have been Earth's first interstellar visitor

'Oumuamua' might not have been Earth's first interstellar visitor Scientists say a pint-sized meteor that hit Earth's atmosphere in 2014 might have come from another star system.

More than half the planets in a star's habitable zone wouldn't be able to host complex life because of the levels of toxic gases like carbon monoxide and dioxide.

HOW DID THEY MEASURE WHICH PLANETS WERE IN A 'SAFE ZONE'?

Experts used computer models to look at the climate on a variety of planets.

Worlds too far from their star need carbon dioxide – a potent greenhouse gas – to trap in heat and maintain temperatures above freezing.

But according to the models, planets on the edge of habitable zones would need toxic levels of carbon dioxide to hit the right temperature to grow life.

NASA May Be Looking in the Wrong Place to Find Life on Mars

NASA May Be Looking in the Wrong Place to Find Life on Mars For decades science fiction writers and movie producers have created stories about life on Mars. There are no small human-like creatures on the Red Planet. However, NASA has sent probes there and continues to look for signs that there may have been life on Mars at some point in the last tens of thousands of years.  It turns out, however, that with all NASA's scientific expertise, its researchers may be looking in the wrong place. Even so, scientists have plenty of reasons to think there is life on other planets.

These planets were thought to be in a star's 'habitable zone', a safe zone where alien life could potentially flourish.

NASA’s Kepler just spotted 18 new Earth-sized planets, but only one is worth dreaming about

NASA’s Kepler just spotted 18 new Earth-sized planets, but only one is worth dreaming about NASA's Kepler Space Telescope may be dead, but that doesn't mean that the wealth of data it gathered doesn't still hold some untold surprises. A new research paper from scientists at the Max Planck Institute, Georg August University, and the Sonneberg Observatory is a great reminder of that, and it reveals the existence of 18 (!) completely new exoplanets that were previously unknown to astronomers. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Criteria they look for is planet which is just the right temperature to hold liquid water – too close to the star and it'll evaporate, too far and it'll freeze.

'Imagine a 'habitable zone for complex life' defined as a safe zone where it would be plausible to support rich ecosystems like we find on Earth today,' said lead scientist Professor Timothy Lyons.

'Our results indicate that complex ecosystems like ours cannot exist in most regions of the habitable zone as traditionally defined.

Professor Lyons and his team used computer models to look at the climate on a variety of planets.

They found that the worlds which were too far from the star, needed carbon dioxide, the important trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere, which traps in heat and maintains temperatures above freezing.

Maybe there ISN'T anyone out there! The number of planets that could support alien life is much smaller than we thought as scientists admit that more than HALF are shrouded in toxic gas© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Researchers, from the University of California, say our estimates of stars' habitable zones have been 'far too generous'. More than half the planets in a star's habitable zone wouldn't be able to host complex life because of the levels of toxic gases like carbon monoxide and dioxide

According to the experts' models, these planets on the edge of habitable zones would need toxic levels of carbon dioxide to hit the right temperature to grow life.

18 Earth-size planets found in our galaxy—all hiding in plain sight

18 Earth-size planets found in our galaxy—all hiding in plain sight And a hundred more small worlds may be awaiting discovery, astronomers predict, thanks to a new method for combing through NASA data.

'To sustain liquid water at the outer edge of the habitable zone, a planet would need tens of thousands of times more carbon dioxide than Earth has today,' said NASA scientist Dr Edward Schwieterman.

'That's far beyond the levels known to be toxic to human and animal life on Earth.'

The new study concludes that carbon dioxide toxicity alone restricts simple animal life to no more than half of the traditional habitable zone.

For humans and other intelligent animals, which are more sensitive, the safe zone shrinks to less than one third of that area.

But all hope isn't lost just yet – the team reckon their results will actually help in our hunt for ET, as it narrows down our options when it comes to pick which planets to explore.

'Our discoveries provide one way to decide which of these myriad planets we should observe in more detail,' said team member Christopher Reinhard.

This Could Be the Most Earth-Like Exoplanet Discovered Yet.
Scientists have discovered a pair of temperate, Earth-sized exoplanet candidates around a nearby star, according to a new paper. What makes this planetary system stand out from all the others discovered in recent years is just how similar one of its planets may be to Earth. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Teegarden’s star is a relatively quiet, ultra-cool star, only 12 light-years away; it’s the 24th closest star to the Sun.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!