Technology: NASA's X-59 supersonic jet will have a 4K TV instead of a forward window - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyNASA's X-59 supersonic jet will have a 4K TV instead of a forward window

04:41  20 june  2019
04:41  20 june  2019 Source:   techcrunch.com

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(CNN) — NASA ' s mission to revolutionize air travel has taken a significant step forward as the space agency starts building its X - 59 QueSST supersonic jet . "But the airplane's shape is carefully tailored such that those shockwaves do not combine. " Instead of getting a loud boom-boom, you're going to

The Lockheed Martin X - 59 QueSST ("Quiet Supersonic Transport") is an American experimental supersonic aircraft being developed for NASA ' s Low-Boom Flight Demonstrator program.

NASA's X-59 supersonic jet will have a 4K TV instead of a forward window© Provided by Oath Inc.

NASA's X-59 QueSST experimental quiet supersonic aircraft will have a cockpit like no other — featuring a big 4K screen where you'd normally have a front window. Why? Because this is one weird-looking plane.

The X-59, which is being developed by Lockheed Martin on a $247 million budget, is meant to go significantly faster than sound without producing a sonic boom, or indeed any noise "faster than a car door closing," at least to observers on the ground.

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The pilot will use video cameras to see through the plane' s long nose, a feature that could become standard on future supersonic planes.

An artist's illustration of NASA ' s X - 59 QueSST supersonic airplane, which the agency will use to test technologies for quiet supersonic aircraft. Lockheed Martin is building the jet for NASA to develop the technology needed for quiet supersonic aircraft for future commercial travel.

Naturally in order to do this the craft has to be as aerodynamic as possible, which precludes the cockpit bump often found in fighter jets. In fact, the design can't even have the pilot up front with a big window, because it would likely be far too narrow. Check out these lines:

The cockpit is more like a section taken out of the plane just over the leading edge of the rather small and exotically shaped wings. So while the view out the sides will be lovely, the view forward would be nothing but nose.

To fix that, the plane will be equipped with several displays, the lower ones just like you might expect on a modern aircraft, but the top one is a 4K monitor that's part of what's called the eXternal Visibility System, or XVS. It shows imagery stitched together from two cameras on the craft's exterior, combined with high-definition terrain data loaded up ahead of time.

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Lockheed Martin. NASA has officially committed to the first flight of its supersonic test plane in just three years. Advances in the use of composite technologies, instead than titanium, is The X - 59 QueSST is shaped to reduce the loudness of a sonic boom to that of a gentle thump, if it’ s heard at all.

Lockheed Martin and NASA are poised to bring supersonic travel back to the commercial aviation industry. Earlier this year, the manufacturing The X - 59 , by contrast, emits a faint "thud" when reaching its apex speed of 940 mph, which the company says is no louder than the slamming of a car

It's not quite the real thing, but pilots spend a lot of time in simulators (as you can see here), so they'll be used to it. And the real world is right outside the other windows if they need a reality check.

Lockheed and NASA's plane is currently in the construction phase, though no doubt some parts are still being designed as well. The program has committed to a 2021 flight date, an ambitious goal considering this is the first such experimental, or X-plane, that the agency has developed in some 30 years. If successful, it could be the precursor to other quiet supersonic craft and could bring back supersonic overland flight in the future.

That's if Boom doesn't beat them to it.

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