Technology: Security researcher demos a modified iPhone charging cable that can hijack your computer - PressFrom - US
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TechnologySecurity researcher demos a modified iPhone charging cable that can hijack your computer

02:40  14 august  2019
02:40  14 august  2019 Source:   bgr.com

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A fake Apple charging cable has been developed that could allow attackers to trick their way into a victim's devices. Security researcher Mike Grover, also known as MG, has developed a fake Lightning-esque cable similar to those used to charge up iPhones that he says could be use to hijack a laptop

Weaponized iPhone Charging Cable Comes with Payload that Allow Hackers to Hijack Your Computer . He is selling the modified iPhone Charging Cable for 0 each that including “You will get the cable BALAJI is a Security Researcher (Threat Research Labs) at Comodo Cybersecurity.

As far as iPhone and Mac hacks are concerned, a California-based security researcher who goes by the name MG recently came up with one of the more clever and intriguing workarounds we’ve seen to date. Whereas most exploits that make the news tend to rely on unsuspecting users clicking on a malicious link or website, MG developed a way to hijack a user’s computer via the lightning cable used to charge iOS devices.

Security researcher demos a modified iPhone charging cable that can hijack your computer© Provided by Penske Media Corporation iphone

Originally brought to light via Motherboard, MG’s hack is seemingly simple and can be explored in-depth on his blog here. Put simply, he delicately tears open a standard lightning cable, modifies it with custom components, and puts it back together. By all accounts, the modified lightning cable looks and performs exactly like one you’d pick up from an Apple retail store.

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A fake Apple charging cable , similar to those used to charge up iPhones , could be use to hijack a laptop or PC just by plugging in, security researcher Mike "It looks like a legitimate cable and works just like one. Not even your computer will notice a difference. Until I, as an attacker, wirelessly take

A fake Apple charging cable , similar to those used to charge up iPhones , could be use to hijack a laptop or PC just by plugging in, security researcher Mike "It looks like a legitimate cable and works just like one. Not even your computer will notice a difference. Until I, as an attacker, wirelessly take

MG demonstrated the hack to Motherboard at the Def Con hacking conference last week and showed off how he was able to remotely hijack a connected Mac and execute any number of commands. Somewhat comically, the modified cable is called the OMGCable.

MG typed in the IP address of the fake cable on his own phone’s browser, and was presented with a list of options, such as opening a terminal on my Mac. From here, a hacker can run all sorts of tools on the victim’s computer.

“It’s like being able to sit at the keyboard and mouse of the victim but without actually being there,” MG said.

All of the modified cables MG produces are handmade and can easily be swapped out with a legitimate cable without a target being any the wiser. One limitation worth noting is that a malicious actor can only access a hijacked Mac within a vicinity of about 300 feet.

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A fake Apple charging cable , similar to those used to charge up iPhones , could be use to hijack a laptop or PC just by plugging in, security researcher Mike "It looks like a legitimate cable and works just like one. Not even your computer will notice a difference. Until I, as an attacker, wirelessly take

A fake Apple charging cable , similar to those used to charge up iPhones , could be use to hijack a laptop or PC just by plugging in, security researcher Mike "It looks like a legitimate cable and works just like one. Not even your computer will notice a difference. Until I, as an attacker, wirelessly take

As to what MG plans to do with his tool, he reportedly wants to sell them as bona fide security tools, presumably for law enforcement agencies. The modified cable isn’t yet available for purchase but MG hopes to have a production model ready soon at a price point of $100.

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You Probably Shouldn't Use a Random Cable to Charge Your iPhone.
Unless you want a hacker to hijack your laptop.

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This is interesting!