Technology: Amazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyAmazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear

18:31  14 august  2019
18:31  14 august  2019 Source:   cnet.com

California could become first to limit facial recognition technology; police aren't happy

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Amazon said this week its facial recognition software can detect a person' s fear . Rekognition is one of many Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud services available for developers. It can be used for facial analysis or sentiment analysis, which identifies different expressions and predicts emotions from

Amazon Rekognition Can Now Identify the Emotion It Provokes in Rational People. Most people familiar with face-scanning software suite Amazon Rekognition, its place in the surveillance state, and its questionable efficacy are apt to fear what the consequences of such a technology might be when

Amazon's controversial facial recognition technology, called Rekognition, has a new skill. It can now spot fear. The company says it recently launched updates to Rekognition's facial analysis features, including improved age estimation and the addition of fear to its emotion detection.

Amazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Advances in AI and the proliferation of surveillance cameras have made it increasingly easier to watch and track individuals. Getty Images

"We have improved accuracy for emotion detection (for all 7 emotions: 'Happy,' 'Sad,' 'Angry,' 'Surprised,' 'Disgusted,' 'Calm' and 'Confused') and added a new emotion: 'Fear,'" according to an update from Amazon on Monday. "Lastly, we have improved age range estimation accuracy; you also get narrower age ranges across most age groups."

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Now , Amazon Web Services (AWS) has rolled out more terrifying features for its cloud-based facial recognition system—including the ability to detect fear . The AWS post reveals that Amazon has updated the range of detectable emotions for Rekognition’ s face analysis to include “ fear ,” adding to a

Amazon ' s Rekognition can now sense when you're afraid. It seems that just like bees, Amazon can sense your fear . Because nothing says "nightmare scenario" quite like a giant tech corporation everyone uses knowing what you're feeling, Amazon announced on Monday that Rekognition, its

Amazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Facial recognition is going to be everywhere

Amazon boasts that its Rekognition software can track and analyze hundreds of people in a photo using a database with tens of millions of faces. The ACLU has expressed concern about law enforcement's use of the technology, saying it could be abused by governments to pose a "grave threat to communities, including people of color and immigrants, and to the trust and respect Amazon has worked to build."

In July, the Orlando Police Department officially ended its Amazon Rekognition program after a bumpy ride. The department had temporarily stopped using Rekognition in June 2018 after the city's pilot program with Amazon ended and after the ACLU penned an open letter to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos highlighting privacy concerns. Amazon employees have also protested the sale of Rekognition software to police.

Amazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear© Getty Images

Security camera is scanning the face of a young man.

Amazon didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Facial recognition tech misidentified 26 California lawmakers as criminals.
The ACLU, which wants to ban facial recognition technology in police body cameras, says that its own tests of the technology mistakenly flagged 26 California lawmakers as criminals. More than half of those falsely identified were people of color. The experiment follows a similar test conducted last year, where 28 members of Congress -- the majority also people of color -- were mistakenly identified as criminals. At a press conference, San Francisco assembly member Phil Ting -- who was also falsely identified during the test -- said that the experiment "reinforces the fact that facial recognition software is not ready for prime time – let alone for use in body cameras w

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