Technology: Amazon's Rekognition falsely matched lawmakers to criminals... again, ACLU says - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

TechnologyAmazon's Rekognition falsely matched lawmakers to criminals... again, ACLU says

23:45  14 august  2019
23:45  14 august  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Amazon’s facial recognition system flags dozens of California lawmakers as criminals

Amazon’s facial recognition system flags dozens of California lawmakers as criminals Facial recognition technology has come a long way in recent years, and today many smartphone users rely on face unlock features to keep their devices secure. Amazon's facial scanning software, called Rekognition, won't unlock your phone, but it is currently being used by some law enforcement agencies to identify criminals based on their mugshots. Last year, the ACLU ran the Rekognition software on photos of members of Congress and found that the software flagged 28 of them as being known criminals. These false positives showed serious flaws in Amazon’s software and highlighted a racial bias in the program, disproportionately tagging people of color.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California says facial recognition technology isn't ready to be used for law enforcement. This comes after a test of Amazon's Rekognition software wrongly flagged 26 California lawmakers as criminals, according to the ACLU.

Amazon's Rekognition falsely matched lawmakers to criminals... again, ACLU says© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. The ACLU and Amazon butted heads Tuesday over facial recognition technology. James Martin/CNET

The ACLU tweeted about the test on Tuesday, saying the software matched 1 in 5 lawmakers to the mugshot of someone who'd been arrested. The test compared legislators' images with a database of 25,000 publicly available mugshots. The ACLU of Northern California also released an image of all the lawmakers it says the Rekognition system erroneously flagged at criminals.

Facial recognition tech misidentified 26 California lawmakers as criminals

Facial recognition tech misidentified 26 California lawmakers as criminals The ACLU, which wants to ban facial recognition technology in police body cameras, says that its own tests of the technology mistakenly flagged 26 California lawmakers as criminals. More than half of those falsely identified were people of color. The experiment follows a similar test conducted last year, where 28 members of Congress -- the majority also people of color -- were mistakenly identified as criminals. At a press conference, San Francisco assembly member Phil Ting -- who was also falsely identified during the test -- said that the experiment "reinforces the fact that facial recognition software is not ready for prime time – let alone for use in body cameras w

The ACLU image includes the text: "Yes on AB 1215. One false match is too many." AB 1215 is a state bill that aims to ban facial recognition software from being used on police body cameras. It was authored by Democratic Assemblyman Phil Ting, who was among the lawmakers wrongly matched by Amazon's system in the ACLU test.

"Imagine the real world implications," Ting tweeted on Monday.

Amazon's Rekognition falsely matched lawmakers to criminals... again, ACLU says© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. ACLU

Amazon, however, says the ACLU is knowingly misrepresenting its technology.

"As we've said many times in the past, when used with the recommended 99% confidence threshold and as one part of a human-driven decision, facial recognition technology can be used for a long list of beneficial purposes, from assisting in the identification of criminals to helping find missing children to inhibiting human trafficking," an Amazon spokesperson said in an emailed statement.

Amazon: Facial recognition program for cops detects emotion

Amazon: Facial recognition program for cops detects emotion SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon has announced its facial recognition program used by one Washington state police agency can now detect emotion, generating concerns from privacy advocates. KING-TV reported Thursday that Amazon announced its Rekognition tool has been enhanced to detect basic emotions, including fear. Officials say the American Civil Liberties Union is seeking a delay on police use of the product without regulation until the implications are discussed. Amazon says Rekognition could be used to monitor unsafe online content and find missing persons on social media.

Amazon's Rekognition falsely matched lawmakers to criminals... again, ACLU says© CNET

The ACLU and Amazon butted heads on Monday over facial recognition technology.

A confidence score, according to Amazon, is a number between 0 and 100 that indicates the probability that a given prediction is correct.

The ACLU says Amazon is knowingly misleading the public about its facial recognition software.

"Amazon knows -- with 100% certainty -- that its law enforcement customers are using lower confidence scores or no score at all when using the company's system," Matt Cagle, technology and civil liberties attorney at the ACLU of Northern California, said in an email Wednesday.

The Washington County Sheriff Office in Oregon is the only law enforcement entity currently listed as an Amazon Rekognition customer, according to the company's website. The Washington County Sheriff's Office didn't immediately respond to request for comment.

Last year, the ACLU accused Amazon of the same privacy faux pas after comparing 25,000 criminal mugshots to members of Congress. The tool thought 28 different members of Congress looked like people who've been arrested. Afterwards, it came to light that the ACLU got its mugshot matches by using the Rekognition software at its default 80% confidence threshold setting. In other words, the software may have returned matches that it was 80% confident were correct. Amazon recommended a 95% plus confidence level for law enforcement agencies.

Amazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear

Amazon's Rekognition software can now spot fear The facial recognition tech is also getting better at estimating a person's age, the company says.

Amazon's Rekognition falsely matched lawmakers to criminals... again, ACLU says© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Backlash grows for police use of facial recognition (The 3:59, Ep. 562)

Amazon Gets Patent for Drone Surveillance System That Could Send the Company's Eyes Into the Sky.
Amazon Gets Patent for Drone Surveillance System That Could Send the Company's Eyes Into the Sky

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!