Technology: Neutron star ‘glitch’ offers scientists a clue into its inner workings - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyNeutron star ‘glitch’ offers scientists a clue into its inner workings

03:30  15 august  2019
03:30  15 august  2019 Source:   bgr.com

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Neutron stars are not only the most dense objects in the Universe, but they rotate very fast and regularly. Until they don't. Occasionally these neutron stars start to spin faster, caused by portions of the inside of the star moving outwards. It ' s called a " glitch " and it provides astronomers a brief insight

Neutron stars are not only the most dense objects in the Universe, but they rotate very fast and regularly. It ' s called a " glitch " and it provides astronomers a brief insight into what lies within these mysterious "One of these components, a soup of superfluid neutrons in the inner layer of the crust

Studying distant objects in space can be tricky for astronomers, especially when those objects begin to do unexpected — and unexplainable — things. Neutron stars are thought to be the most dense objects in space, and scientists have a pretty good handle on how they form. However, the tendency of some neutron stars to “glitch,” or behave erratically, has left astronomers scratching their heads.

Neutron star ‘glitch’ offers scientists a clue into its inner workings© Provided by Penske Media Corporation A new Chandra movie of the Vela pulsar shows it may be “precessing,” or wobbling as it spins.

Now, a new study published in Nature Astronomy takes a close look at observations of a distant neutron star called the Vela Pulsar and offers an explanation for its own peculiar behavior while helping to explain the inner workings of these interesting objects.

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Scientists observed a neutron star " glitching " and rapidly accelerating. “One of these components, a soup of superfluid neutrons in the inner layer of the crust, moves outwards first and hits the rigid outer crust of the star causing it to spin up,” Monash astronomer Paul Lasky said in the press release.

Neutron stars are not only the most dense objects in the Universe, but they rotate very fast and regularly. EurekAlert! offers eligible public information officers paid access to a reliable news release distribution service. More on this News Release. Glitch in neutron star reveals its hidden secrets.

Neutron stars are typically consistent in their rotation, spinning very fast at a constant rate. However, when the stars glitch, they begin to rotate faster, and it wasn’t clear why that happens.

The Vela Pulsar is a favorite target for researchers because it experiences these glitches quite regularly, every few years or so, and observations from its most recent glitch in 2016 held clues that had previously been overlooked. Specifically, the data offered scientists a peek inside the star itself, revealing its structure.

Based on their observations, the researchers believe the star is made up of three distinct components, including a firm outer crust covering an inner “soup” of superfluid neutrons. The study explains that as one layer of this neutron soup pushes against the inside of the crust, the star begins to spin faster. The scientists refer to this as “overshoot.” Then, a second wave of superfluid meets the first, slowing things back down to a more stable state.

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Neutron stars rotate rapidly, emitting pulses of electromagnetic energy at regular intervals. A group of scientists - led by a team from the Australian University of Monash - pored over data taken from a Glitches are thought to be caused when excess angular momentum from neutrons in the inner crust

Occasionally these neutron stars start to spin faster, caused by portions of the inside of the star moving outwards. It ’ s called a “ glitch ” and it provides astronomers a brief insight into “One of these components, a soup of superfluid neutrons in the inner layer of the crust, moves outwards first and

This discovery matches some previously-held theories regarding neutron star glitches, but the research raises another puzzling question: Before the glitch in Vela was observed, the star’s rotation seemed to slow down before speeding up to an even higher rate, and it’s unclear how this initial “lag” plays a role in the glitch, but the scientists believe they are likely related.

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