Technology: Huawei employees reportedly caught helping African governments spy on opposition - PressFrom - US
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TechnologyHuawei employees reportedly caught helping African governments spy on opposition

05:35  15 august  2019
05:35  15 august  2019 Source:   bgr.com

Huawei will reportedly release a phone with its own OS this year

Huawei will reportedly release a phone with its own OS this year According to a report by Chinese media site the company might release a phone running the HongMeng OS by the end of the year. © Provided by The Next WebThe report suggests the mid-range device might be priced around 2000 Yuan ($288). Its aim is to attract developers and users to to join the ecosystem, which is being built to rival Google’s Android OS. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

The paper is reporting that technicians working for Huawei helped members of government in Uganda and Zambia spy on political opponents. A representative for Zambia’s ruling party confirmed with the paper that Huawei technicians have helped in the fight against news sites with opposing stances in

Huawei employees intercepted encrypted messages to help African governments spy on political opponents, says WSJ. In two separate cases in Uganda and Zambia, the Journal found that Huawei employees used its technology to aid domestic spying on behalf of governments in those countries.

Well, the US now has yet another reported case of espionage-related misdeeds it can point to as additional proof of why the Huawei ban should remain in place.

Huawei employees reportedly caught helping African governments spy on opposition© Provided by Penske Media Corporation huawei

The Chinese consumer electronics giant is under scrutiny again, this time over a Wall Street Journal report that found some of its employees helped governments in African keep tabs on political opposition using cell data to spy on their movements. Reportedly, those Huawei technicians also helped the governments track social media accounts and intercept encrypted communications.

This kind of finding bolsters the case the US has been making against the company, which is that the company is so tight with China’s central government that it can’t be permitted to gain a foothold here lest that open the door to Chinese spying. Not that the Huawei ban seemed poised to be lifted anytime soon, which has caused myriad headaches for the company’s smartphone ambitions and especially for some of its high-profile upcoming handset launches.

Huawei technicians may have helped African governments spy on opponents

Huawei technicians may have helped African governments spy on opponents An investigation by The Washington Post claims Huawei technicians helped African governments spy on domestic political opponents. According to the report, Huawei employees helped authorities in Uganda intercept encrypted messages and allowed police in Zambia to locate opposition bloggers. Such claims could validate the Trump administration's concerns about the use of Huawei technology in the US, but Huawei told The Washington Post it has "never been engaged in 'hacking' activities.

Huawei employees stationed in Uganda and Zambia have helped the Ugandan and Zambian governments spy on their political opponents, which has led to the opponents' arrests in both countries, the Wall Street Journal reports. In Kampala, Uganda, Huawei employees reportedly

An investigation by The Washington Post claims Huawei technicians helped African governments spy on domestic political opponents. According to the report, Huawei employees helped authorities in Uganda intercept encrypted messages and allowed police in Zambia to locate opposition bloggers.

The US also had plenty of ammunition already to support its stance, which has included the Dept. of Justice filing a series of criminal charges in January that alleges Huawei’s CFO committed wire fraud, among other things. The ban is still in place, which has led Huawei to begin changing up its operation to put more of its fate in its own hands such as by relying less on overseas handset sales and working on its own mobile operating system.

Huawei’s top brass back in China doesn’t seem to have been aware of what was going on in Africa, according to the WSJ which also didn’t find evidence of Chinese government-backed spying on the continent. Nor were the activities that took place tied to features of Huawei phones specific to those devices.

Huawei employees reportedly aided African governments in spying

Huawei employees reportedly aided African governments in spying A new report from The Wall Street Journal could be another damning piece of evidence for a company already under a good deal of international scrutiny. The paper is reporting that technicians working for Huawei helped members of government in Uganda and Zambia spy on political opponents. The report cites unnamed senior surveillance officers. The paper adds that an investigation didn’t confirm a direct tie between the Chinese government or Huawei executives. It did, however, appear to confirm that employees for the tech giant played a part in intercepting communications.

But Huawei employees have provided other services, not disclosed publicly. Technicians from the Chinese powerhouse have, in at least two cases, personally helped African governments spy on their political opponents, including intercepting their encrypted communications and social media

What you need to know Some Huawei employees were caught intercepting messages for the African government . The messages were used to spy on political opponents in Uganda and Zambia. Even so, this certainly isn't a good look for the company and doesn't help the already-tarnished

As far as what did reportedly occur, the report detailed two separate cases in Uganda and Zambia. As part of the former, Huawei technicians holed up in Uganda’s police headquarters to use Israeli-made spyware to break into encrypted messages belonging to a rapper and activist, Bobi Wine. Those Huawei technicians did so, per the WSJ, after a Ugandan cyber team asked for the help.

In Zambia, the report continues, Huawei technicians helped government officials access phones and Facebook pages of opposition bloggers for a site that’s criticized President Edgar Lungu. That led to those bloggers’ arrests.

In response to this news, Huawei hit back forcefully, telling the newspaper it’s “never been engaged in ‘hacking’ activities.”

“Huawei rejects completely these unfounded and inaccurate allegations against our business operations,” the spokesperson told the Journal. “Our internal investigation shows clearly that Huawei and its employees have not been engaged in any of the activities alleged. We have neither the contracts nor the capabilities to do so.”

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Huawei reckons US ban will cost its phone division $10 billion.
The company's CEO previously estimated it'd take a $30 billion hit.

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