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TechnologyThe Pentagon Is Giving Up on Particle Beam Weapons

23:35  08 september  2019
23:35  08 september  2019 Source:   popularmechanics.com

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Griffin emphasized however that the Pentagon was still forging ahead with research into lasers and microwave weapons , for use Griffin first brought up possible deployment of particle beams in March 2018, and in March 2019 announced it was aiming for a neutral particle beam test in space sometime

Griffin emphasized however that the Pentagon was still forging ahead with research into lasers and microwave weapons , for use Griffin first brought up possible deployment of particle beams in March 2018, and in March 2019 announced it was aiming for a neutral particle beam test in space sometime.

The Pentagon Is Giving Up on Particle Beam Weapons© Bettmann - Getty Images The Department of Defense doesn’t think they could be weaponized soon enough.
  • The DoD, which showed interest in neutral particle beams earlier this year, now thinks they're too hard to field anytime soon.
  • Particle beams work by using atomic and subatomic particles to "melt" their target.
  • The Pentagon wanted to use neutral particle beams to shoot down incoming ballistic missiles during takeoff phase.

The Department of Defense is pushing hard into directed energy technologies, particularly lasers, but there’s one weapon that won’t be deployed in the field anytime soon: neutral particle beams (NPBs). Just over a year after announcing a renewed interest into the tech the Pentagon has decided to shelve research into NPBs, stating that they were “not near term enough.” Translation: even with military funding the services wouldn’t see a particle beam weapon soon enough to make worthwhile.

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Neutral particle beam weapons work by accelerating particles without an electric charge—particularly neutrons—to speeds close to the speed of light and A piece of aluminum burned by a ground test of the Army's BEAR weapon . The Pentagon is pursuing this technology in response to threats such as

The Pentagon wants to explore the utility of a neutral particle - beam weapon in orbit as a missile defense weapon , according to its 2020 budget proposal. It’s just one of many ways the US is rushing to become the first nation to introduce weapons into space.

According to DefenseOne, U.S. Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering Mike Griffin recently told a gathering of defense reporters, “We are deferring work on neutral particle beams, indefinitely. It’s just not near-term enough.” Griffin emphasized however that the Pentagon was still forging ahead with research into lasers and microwave weapons, for use by ground forces, air forces, and in space.

Griffin first brought up possible deployment of particle beams in March 2018, and in March 2019 announced it was aiming for a neutral particle beam test in space sometime in 2023. The Pentagon apparently wants to use it to destroy enemy ballistic missiles shortly after takeoff, when they are most vulnerable, and before multiple nuclear warheads can separate from the launch booster.

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That means that first the Pentagon must demonstrate that such a weapon is possible before it can even begin to "The addition of the neutral particle beam effort will design, develop and conduct a feasibility demonstration for a Coronavirus hysteria is giving people vivid dreams - here's why.

That means that first the Pentagon must demonstrate that such a weapon is possible before it can even begin to develop a device usable for missile defense "The addition of the neutral particle beam effort will design, develop and conduct a feasibility demonstration for a space-based Directed Energy

The Pentagon Is Giving Up on Particle Beam Weapons© U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter D. Blair/DVIDS The U.S. will continue to research other directed energy weapons, as the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) deployed on the USS Ponce in 2014.

Neutral particle beams are basically “death rays” from science fiction. NPBs involve accelerating streams of atomic or subatomic particles to nearly light speed and shooting them downrange at a target. Once the particles collide with the target, they began to unravel it at the atomic and molecular level, breaking the bonds that create its shape. At a visual level, it would appear that the target is melting. The kinetic energy transferred from the particles to the target also heats it up, contributing to the melting of the target material.

Neutral particle beams have technological and engineering challenges similar to those of other directed energy weapons. NPBs require lots of energy, a mechanism to accelerate and focus the particles or subatomic particles, and another mechanism for aiming them. The Department of Defense, which has seen Russian and Chinese advances in other high tech categories including lasers, rail guns, and hypersonic weapons, needs to push tech out into the field soon and apparently thinks investing in NPBs now won’t get them anywhere anytime soon.

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