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Technology2020 Olympics in Tokyo will use facial recognition technology

14:00  11 september  2019
14:00  11 september  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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NEC has announced that it will provide a large-scale facial recognition system for the 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo . We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo will deploy a facial recognition system to identify more than 300,000 athletes, staff, volunteers, and journalists at the games. It’s the first time that facial recognition technology will be used for security at the Olympics .

If you're an athlete, sponsor, journalist or volunteer at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, you'll be using a facial recognition system from Japanese electronics giant NEC and chipmaker Intel to get where you need to be.

2020 Olympics in Tokyo will use facial recognition technology© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, California. Stephen Shankland/CNET

Intel is collaborating with NEC to provide "a large-scale face recognition system for the Olympics," said Ricardo Echevarria, general manager of Intel's Olympics program. The system is designed to let Olympics organizers "ensure smoothly secure verification for the over 300,000 people at the games who are accredited," he said. People using it will register with photos from government-issued IDs, he added.

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TOKYO — A facial recognition system will be used across an Olympics for the first time as Tokyo organizers work to keep security tight and efficient at dozens of venues during the 2020 Games. The NeoFace technology developed by NEC Corp. will be customized to monitor every accredited person

Intel is set to roll out a large-scale facial recognition technology system at next year's Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Intel says that will be used to ensure a smooth and secure identification process for the 300,000 or so accredited people attendees at Tokyo 2020 , cutting down possible ID fraud and

Facial recognition has grown by leaps and bounds with the arrival of the sophisticated pattern-matching abilities of modern artificial intelligence technology called neural networks. But many are alarmed about pervasive computer surveillance, leading cities like Somerville, Massachusetts, and San Francisco and Oakland, California, to bar police from using the technology.

Intel didn't comment on the privacy or data retention aspects of the technology, and NEC said that's the purview of the Tokyo Olympics organizers. Those organizers didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

NEC will deploy hundreds of facial recognition systems around the Olympics facilities, a move that should speed up ID checks for accredited people, Echevarria said. It's the first time the Olympics have used that facial recognition technology.

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NeoFace: NEC Facial Recognition provides a large-scale facial recognition system “NeoFace” for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo . Powered by the Intel Core i5 processor, the facial recognition technology will be used to identify over 300,000 people at the games, including athletes

Tokyo 2020 will be the first Olympics to deploy facial recognition technology to increase security around all venues, organizers announced on Tuesday. The technology was demonstrated for the media at an event this week in Tokyo and will use IC chips within identification cards to automatically

2020 Olympics in Tokyo will use facial recognition technology© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Tokyo 2020

It won't be a wholesale replacement for the old ways: Accredited personnel at the Olympics will still have to wear traditional ID lanyards, Intel and NEC said. But the facial recognition system will be required: if someone loses their lanyard or tries to get access with one that's stolen, the facial recognition system will block them, NEC said.

"Facial recognition improves security and efficiency by being able to confirm a picture ID against the face of the person seeking to enter a facility with greater speed and accuracy than human staff," NEC said.

Intel will be involved in other Olympic-related moves, too:

  • It's helped develop a technology called 3DAT (3D Athlete Tracking) that broadcasters can use to boost instant-replay videos with data about player movements. An AI system processes video data rapidly to generate the overlay graphics.
  • Intel also is helping to run a global esports gaming competition in parallel with the Olympics in Tokyo. Players from an initial group of 20 countries will compete in the videogame event, which also includes participation from gaming companies Capcom and Epic Games.
  • It's building virtual reality training realms that athletes and organizers can use to visualize arenas and other facilities.
Read More

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ACLU attorneys asked a federal court in Massachusetts to order the Justice Department, FBI, and DEA to release documents about how the government uses the software.ACLU attorneys asked a federal court in Massachusetts to order the agencies to release documents about how the government uses and audits the software, how officials have communicated with companies that provide the software, and what internal guidelines and safeguards regulate its use.

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