Technology: Toyota Research Institute developing robots to assist the elderly at home - How old is it? Old Age Simulator Responds - PressFrom - US
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Technology Toyota Research Institute developing robots to assist the elderly at home

16:50  07 october  2019
16:50  07 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

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The Robobear, designed by Japan's research institution RIKEN, could help lift the elderly . YouTube/ Plastic Pals. At a time where Google is pulling back During a talk with journalists in Tokyo last week, Gill Pratt, the CEO of the Toyota Research Institute , said the company is working on robots that can

The Toyota Research Institute hasn't identified any other specific goals it has for its robots outside of elderly care, but Hanson said the institute is generally Considering Toyota is in final talks to acquire several robotics companies, the company's push into home robotics doesn't come as a huge surprise.

As many countries across the world are experiencing surges in the proportion of elderly persons in their populations, ensuring that all people are properly attended to becomes increasingly difficult. To address this challenge, Toyota's Research Institute announced late last week that an at-home assistant robot is in development, one that has the capacity to continuously learn how to do new tasks in all types of homes.

a kitchen with a sink and a window: Toyota Research Institute is teaching robots to help the elderly perform home tasks.© Courtesy of Toyota Research Institute Toyota Research Institute is teaching robots to help the elderly perform home tasks.

With the primary goal to assist the increasing ratio of older persons across the world, Toyota recently announced that their Research Institute is developing an at-home robot assistant whose intelligence continuously evolves.

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The Toyota Research Institute hasn't identified any other specific goals it has for its robots outside of elderly care, but Hanson said the institute is generally Considering Toyota is in final talks to acquire several robotics companies, the company's push into home robotics doesn't come as a huge surprise.

At Toyota Research Institute (TRI), we are working to build a Develop technology for vehicles and robots to help people with new levels of independence, access and mobility. If you're passionate about working with smart people to make cars safer, enable the elderly to age in a place, OR design

Via a technology called fleet learning (the same science enabling Tesla's network of autonomously driving vehicles to get better at traveling without human intervention), these robots use cloud robotics and deep learning to share know-how with all bots in the network, allowing the others to perform the same task in their respective environments. According to Toyota, this technology allows the fleet to "achieve an exponential increase in robotic capabilities."

TRI Teaching Robots to Help People in their Homes

https://t.co/UkwF6vBO7U

WATCH FULL VIDEO:

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Toyota is using VR to train robots as in-home helpers

  Toyota is using VR to train robots as in-home helpers Home robots could make all of our lives easier, and perhaps most importantly, they could allow seniors to live more independently. But training robots to operate in homes is difficult because each home is unique and filled with so many objects in different combinations and layouts. Toyota Research Institute (TRI) may have a solution: using virtual reality to change the way we train robots. The VR training system allows human teachers to see what the robot is seeing live, in 3D, from its sensors. The teacher can instruct the robot and annotate the 3D scene, for instance adding a note on how to grasp a handle.

The Toyota Research Institute is hard at work on developing robots that can assist you in daily tasks, such as putting away the groceries and the dishes, folding the laundry, and tidying up before guests come over. Dr. Russ Tedrake, TRI Vice President of Robotics Research , says that this kind of

Toyota Research Institute (TRI) may have a solution: using virtual reality to change the way we train robots . The system isn't perfect yet. In its video, TRI reminds viewers that it creates research prototypes, not product concepts. Still, the VR-based system could change the way robots learn and

— Toyota Research Institute (TRI) (@ToyotaResearch)

October 3, 2019

New tasks can be taught to the robots by humans in addition to being programmed within the software; such fine-tuning gives the robots highly specific abilities otherwise not developed by the Research Institute. Even so, the robots will be delivered with an extensive repertoire of skills and the ability to adapt to different and evolving homes. The team "teach[es] the robot to perform arbitrary tasks with a variety of objects, rather than program the robot to perform specific predefined tasks with specific objects," so that the robots can approach similar -- albeit not exactly the same -- situations accordingly.

While these robots are being developed to help older individuals gain a higher quality of life, Toyota sees this technology also expanding towards manufacturing facilities. As of right now, only prototypes of these robots exist -- the company does not comment on when they could hit the market.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IGCIjp2bn4

MIT made an army of tiny, 'virtually indestructible' cheetah robots that can backflip and even play with a soccer ball — see them in action in this new video .
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