Technology: Apple removes app used by Hong Kong protesters to locate police - PressFrom - US
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Technology Apple removes app used by Hong Kong protesters to locate police

14:33  10 october  2019
14:33  10 october  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

HK activists, Beijing supporters demonstrate in London

HK activists, Beijing supporters demonstrate in London Demonstrators backing the democracy activists in Hong Kong marched in London on Saturday, as counter-protesters staged a rival rally. 

Apple removes HKmap.live app used by Hong Kong protesters under pressure from China. Beijing — Apple removed a smartphone app that allows Hong Kong activists to report police movements from its online store Thursday after an official Chinese newspaper accused the company

The maker of the iPhone has removed an app that allowed rioters in Hong Kong track where police are located after reports that it was used to Following the suit of other companies taking sides in ongoing tensions in China's autonomous city, Apple allowed HKmap.live to appear in its app store.

Beijing — Apple removed a smartphone app that allows Hong Kong activists to report police movements from its online store Thursday after an official Chinese newspaper accused the company of facilitating illegal behavior. Apple Inc. was just the latest company to come under pressure to take Beijing's side against anti-government protesters when the Communist Party newspaper People's Daily said Wednesday the HKmap.live app "facilitates illegal behavior."

a group of people looking at a cell phone: FILE PHOTO: Protest to demand authorities scrap a proposed extradition bill with China, in Hong Kong© REUTERS FILE PHOTO: Protest to demand authorities scrap a proposed extradition bill with China, in Hong Kong

The newspaper asked, "Is Apple guiding Hong Kong thugs?"

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Apple has removed an app that protesters in Hong Kong have used to track police movements and tear gas use , saying the app violated its rules. Media captionThe weekend saw riots over the mask ban, a second person shot, and tear gas fired at protesters . A number of companies have drawn the

A protester wearing a Guy Fawkes mask uses her mobile phone during a demonstration in Hong Kong on Wednesday. HKmap.live, a smartphone programme that allows Hong Kong activists to report police movements, was removed from Apple 's App Store today after Beijing's mouthpiece

Apple said in a statement that HKmap.live was removed because it "has been used to target and ambush police" and "threaten public safety." It said that violated local law and Apple guidelines.

HKmap.live allows users to report police locations, use of tear gas and other details that are added to a regularly updated map. Another version is available for smartphones that use the Android operating system.

"We have verified with the Hong Kong Cybersecurity and Technology Crime Bureau (CSTCB) that the app has been used to target and ambush police, threaten public safety, and criminals have used it to victimize residents in areas where they know there is no law enforcement," said the Apple statement. "This app violates our guidelines and local laws, and we have removed it from the App Store."

Hong Kong protesters to take their democracy message to U.S. Consulate

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SAN FRANCISCO/ HONG KONG (Reuters) - Apple Inc has removed an app that helped Hong Kong protesters track police movements, saying it was used to ambush law enforcement - a move that follows sharp criticism of the U.S. tech giant by a Chinese state newspaper for allowing the software.

Apple said it was removing the app , called HKmap.live, from its iPhone App Store just days after approving it because authorities in Hong Kong said protesters were using it to attack police there. A day earlier, People’s Daily, the flagship newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party, published an

a close up of a map: A display of the app © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. A display of the app

The app's developers, however, rejected Apple's move and said there was, "0 evidence to support CSTCB's accusation that HKmap App has been used to target and ambush police, threaten public safety."

The app maker accused Apple of removing HKmap.live in a deliberate "decision to suppress freedom and human right in #HongKong," and added that it was "disappointing to see US corps such as @Apple, @NBA, @Blizzard_Ent, @TiffanyAndCo act against #freedom."

The Hong Kong demonstrations began over a proposed extradition law and expanded to include other grievances and demands for greater democracy.

Activists complain Beijing and Hong Kong leaders are eroding the autonomy and Western-style civil liberties promised to the former British colony when it returned to China in 1997.

Criticism of Apple followed government attacks starting last weekend on the National Basketball Association over a comment by the general manager of the Houston Rockets in support of the protesters. China's state TV has canceled broadcasts of NBA games.

2 Hong Kong protesters charged under mask ban

  2 Hong Kong protesters charged under mask ban Two protestors were charged Monday in the first violations of Hong Kong's new ban on wearing masks at rallies, the Associated Press reported.An 18-year-old student and a 38-year-old woman were the first to be prosecuted under the ban, which was instituted by Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam on Friday using emergency powers.The two were detained Saturday shortly after the ban's implementation. An 18-year-old student and a 38-year-old woman were the first to be prosecuted under the ban, which was instituted by Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam on Friday using emergency powers.

Apple Inc on Wednesday removed an app that protesters in Hong Kong have used to track police movements from its app store, saying it violated rules because it was used to ambush police . The U.S. tech giant had come under fire from China over the app

Apple has removed an app that protesters in Hong Kong have used to track police movements and tear gas use , saying the app violated its rules. The company said the app , HKmap.live, had "been used in ways that endanger law enforcement and residents". Apple initially rejected the app - which uses

People's Daily warned Apple might hurt its reputation with Chinese consumers.

"Apple needs to think deeply," the newspaper said.

Brands targeted in the past by Beijing have been subjected to campaigns by the entirely state-controlled press to drive away consumers or disrupt investigations by tax authorities and other regulators.

China has long been critical to Apple's business.

The mainland is Apple's second-biggest market after the United States but CEO Tim Cook says it eventually will become No. 1.

Apple, headquartered in Cupertino, California, also is an important asset for China.

Most of its iPhones and tablet computers are assembled in Chinese factories that employ hundreds of thousands of people. Chinese vendors supply components for Mac Pro computers that are assembled in Texas.

Apple removes Hong Kong protest app following Chinese pressure .
Apple's complex relationship with China has made the headlines again. Just a day after Chinese state media criticized the company for allowing HKmap in its App Store -- and a week after Apple flip flopped on its initial decision to delist the app -- the crowdsourced map app has been removed, again sparking concerns that Apple is pandering to China's political regime. The app, which shares information on the location of pro-democracy protests and police activity in Hong Kong, was slammed by China Daily -- owned by the Communist Party of China -- for enabling "rioters in Hong Kong to go on violent acts," adding that Apple has to "think about the consequences of its

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