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Technology Elizabeth Warren says she won't take major donations from big tech executives

21:50  15 october  2019
21:50  15 october  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who has vowed to break up big tech companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon if she becomes president, said Tuesday she won't accept major donations from executives in large tech and finance firms.

Elizabeth Warren posing for the camera: Sen. Elizabeth Warren's pledge to break up big tech companies has been a large part of her presidential campaign. Getty Images© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Sen. Elizabeth Warren's pledge to break up big tech companies has been a large part of her presidential campaign. Getty Images

"Money slithers through every part of our political system, corrupting democracy and taking power away from the people," Warrren wrote in a post on her website. "Big companies and billionaires spend millions to push Congress to adopt or block legislation."

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  Zuckerberg says he's ready for a legal fight if Warren becomes president The Facebook CEO delivers fighting words in leaked audio of internal meetings.That's just one tidbit from audio of internal Facebook meetings obtained by The Verge and published on Tuesday. During two meetings, which reportedly took place in July, Zuckerberg also talked with employees about the company's Libra cryptocurrency, protecting content moderators and the rise of TikTok.

The Massachusetts Democrat said she would swear off contributions more than $200 from executives at big tech companies, big banks, private equity firms, or hedge funds. She doesn't mention specific banks or tech companies by name in the post.

Warren has made breaking up tech companies a big part of her campaign, arguing Facebook, Google and Amazon have too much power, stifle competition and innovation and hurt small businesses. Facebook has pushed back against the idea of breaking up Instagram and WhatsApp from the company, stating that regulation not a breakup will help hold the social network more accountable for its actions.

Prof challenges Facebook for removing Warren controversy page

  Prof challenges Facebook for removing Warren controversy page The owner of a website that details various controversies surrounding Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., says an accompanying Facebook page was taken down without any notice after it was deemed in violation of Facebook's policy against impersonation.William Jacobson, a law professor at Cornell Law School, owns and runs elizabethwarrenwiki.org — a website dedicated to various controversies surrounding the Democratic presidential candidate, particularly her claims to have Native American heritage.

Tensions between Warren and Facebook have escalated this month. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told employees in an internal meeting that was leaked to The Verge that he was ready to "go to the mat" and fight if Warren became president and tried to break up the company.

Warren also criticized Facebook last week for not fact checking ads by politicians. The company told Biden's presidential campaign that it wasn't going to remove a false ad by President Donald Trump's reelection campaign because the company considers it direct speech from a politician. Over the weekend, Warren ran an ad with the false claim that Zuckerberg endorsed Trump with a correction in the post to prove a point about the company's policy.

Elizabeth Warren posing for the camera: Sen. Elizabeth Warren's pledge to break up big tech companies has been a large part of her presidential campaign. © CNET

Sen. Elizabeth Warren's pledge to break up big tech companies has been a large part of her presidential campaign.

Facebook declined to comment. Amazon and Google didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Warren doubles down on pledge to not to give diplomatic posts to donors .
Sen. Elizabeth Warren doubled down on her pledge to not give diplomatic posts to big donors during Wednesday night's debate. "I've taken a pledge, anyone who gives a big donation don't ask to be an ambassador. I ask everyone running for president to join me in that, and not a single person has so far," Warren said.Her answer came in wake of Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland's bombshell testimony earlier in the day as part of the ongoing impeachment inquiry. "How did Ambassador Sondland get there?" Warren said, adding that his only qualification was writing a "check for a million dollars.

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