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Technology Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pushes back against claims of conservative censorship

21:55  18 october  2019
21:55  18 october  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with Donald Trump

  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with Donald Trump The social network said Zuckerberg had a "good, constructive" meeting with the president."Mark is in Washington DC meeting with policymakers to hear their concerns and talk about future internet regulation. He also had a good, constructive meeting with President Trump at the White House today," a Facebook spokesman said in a statement on Thursday.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg reiterated that the social network wants to be a "platform for all ideas," the latest defense against concerns the site has too much power to shape political and social issues.

Mark Zuckerberg holding a racket: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg James Martin/CNET© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg James Martin/CNET

In an interview with Fox News aired Friday, Zuckerberg said he hasn't seen enough evidence that Silicon Valley was biased against conservative voices.

"I haven't seen a lot of data that suggest that there's a negative impact," he said.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with Trump

  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with Trump The social network said Zuckerberg had a "good, constructive" meeting with the president."Mark is in Washington, D.C., meeting with policymakers to hear their concerns and talk about future internet regulation. He also had a good, constructive meeting with President Trump at the White House today," a Facebook spokesman said in a statement on Thursday.

The comments come a day after Zuckerberg delivered a full-throated defense of Facebook's policies in a speech at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Zuckerberg said a lot of conservative media do "quite well" on social media. With California being largely left-leaning, the tech mogul said he understands where the concern comes from.

"I understand why people would ask the question of 'are my ideas getting a fair shake.' And all that I can say on this is this is something I care deeply about. I want to make sure we can be a platform for all ideas," he said.

Facebook has faced mounting criticism over whether it's doing enough to combat hate speech, misinformation and other offensive content. The company has been accused of vague policies and inconsistent application of them. That's led to charges the company is censoring some forms of speech, particularly from conservative voices, an allegation Facebook denies.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg live streams employee Q&A in rare move

  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg live streams employee Q&A in rare move Zuckerberg's internal Q&As with employees were leaked earlier this week.Zuckerberg broadcasted the Q&A from his Facebook account days after The Verge published transcripts and audio clips of Zuckerberg speaking to employees at two town hall meetings in July. In his leaked remarks, Zuckerberg told employees he was ready to "go to the mat" and fight for Facebook if Sen. Elizabeth Warren becomes president and tries to break up the social media giant.

Earlier this month, Sen. Kamala Harris, a Democrat from California, asked Twitter to suspend Trump's account arguing that his tweets violated the site's rules against bullying. The presidential candidate, cited several tweets from Trump including those that Harris said targeted a whistleblower whose complaint about the president's call with the Ukraine president led to an impeachment inquiry.

When asked if it's a "ridiculous idea" for Twitter to shut down Trump's account, Zuckerberg said that he doesn't think people in a democracy want a private company censoring the news.

"I generally believe that as a principle, people should decide what is credible and what they want to believe, who they want to vote for," he said.

Facebook also recently came under fire for a policy that allows politicians to include falsehoods in their advertisements. Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic presidential hopeful who has called for the breakup of Facebook, tested that policy, placing an ad that said Zuckerberg had endorsed President Donald Trump.

Mark Zuckerberg defends free speech on Facebook

  Mark Zuckerberg defends free speech on Facebook Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage at Georgetown today to defend freedom of expression. Most recently, Facebook has been criticized for allowing politicians to post misleading ads. But Zuckerberg is calling for more free speech and cautioned against "potentially cracking down too much" on social networks. In an interview with The Washington Post, Zuckerberg says he too worries "about an erosion of truth." But, he added, "I don'tIn an interview with The Washington Post, Zuckerberg says he too worries "about an erosion of truth." But, he added, "I don't think people want to live in a world where you can only say things that tech companies decide are 100 percent true.

The battle over free speech is just one front in Facebook's growing problems. Politicians and regulators around the world have blasted its plans for a cryptocurrency, dubbed Libra. (Zuckerberg is expected to discuss Libra during congressional testimony next week.) Facebook's dominance in social networking has led to allegations that it engages in monopolistic behavior.  And the company's privacy policies remain a constant source of controversy.

Mark Zuckerberg holding a racket© CNET

Facebook's Zuckerberg: People need to make their own judgements on political ads .
Mark Zuckerberg again defends the social network's policy on political advertisements."What I believe is that in a democracy, it's really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments, Zuckerberg told CBS This Morning co-host Gayle King. "And, you know, I don't think that a private company should be censoring politicians or news.

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