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Technology How to Halt Global Warming for $300 Billion

13:30  23 october  2019
13:30  23 october  2019 Source:   bloomberg.com

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$ 300 billion . That’s the money needed to stop the rise in greenhouse gases and buy up to 20 years of time to fix global warming , according Nor is it merely a matter of planting trees, since each area has to be considered in terms of the people who live there and how they can live on the land sustainably.

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(Bloomberg) -- $300 billion. That’s the money needed to stop the rise in greenhouse gases and buy up to 20 years of time to fix global warming, according to United Nations climate scientists. It’s the gross domestic product of Chile, or the world’s military spending every 60 days.

The sum is not to fund green technologies or finance a moonshot solution to emissions, but to use simple, age-old practices to lock millions of tons of carbon back into an overlooked and over-exploited resource: the soil.

“We have lost the biological function of soils. We have got to reverse that,” said Barron J. Orr, lead scientist for the UN Convention to Combat Desertification. “If we do it, we are turning the land into the big part of the solution for climate change.”

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Global warming is the long-term rise in the average temperature of the Earth's climate system. It is a major aspect of current climate change

Assuming you mean future global warming : Realistically, it is not possible to stop it. According to the UN study, we would have to cut 35. Spread the Awareness: Always try your best to educate people about global warming and it causes and after effects. Tell them how they can contribute their part by

a person that is standing in the grass: China Strives To Combat Desertification For Sustainable Development© Getty Images via Bloomberg China Strives To Combat Desertification For Sustainable Development

A local waters plants in the desert at Mingqin county, Gansu province in March.

Photographer: Wang He/Getty Images

Rene Castro Salazar, an assistant director general at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, said that of the 2 billion hectares of land around the world that has been degraded by misuse, overgrazing, deforestation and other largely human factors, 900 million hectares (almost 5 billion acres) could be restored.

Returning that land to pasture, food crops or trees would convert enough carbon into biomass to stabilize emissions of CO2, the biggest greenhouse gas, for 15-20 years, giving the world time to adopt carbon-neutral technologies.

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Climate change is greatest humanitarian challenge facing the world as heatwaves, floods and forest fires become more severe.

Global warming is largely caused by carbon dioxide emissions. Unfortunately, the modern global economy heavily relies on carbon-based fuels. Because of this, taking on global warming might seem overwhelming. However, there are many things you can do to help reduce its effect.

“With political will and investment of about $300 billion, it is doable,” Castro Salazar said. We would be “using the least-cost options we have, while waiting for the technologies in energy and transportation to mature and be fully available in the market. It will stabilize the atmospheric changes, the fight against climate change, for 15-20 years. We very much need that.”

a close up of a map: Vanishing Forests© Bloomberg Vanishing Forests

The heart of the idea is to tackle the growing problem of desertification -- the degradation of dry land to the point where it can support little life. At least a third of the world’s land has been degraded to some extent, directly affecting the lives of 2 billion people, said Eduardo Mansur, director of the land and water division at the FAO.

Marginal lands are being stressed around the globe by the twin phenomena of accelerated climate change and a rate of population growth that could lift the global tally to almost 10 billion people by 2050, he said. Much of that growth is in areas such as Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia where land is already highly stressed.

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Global warming — the gradual heating of Earth's surface, oceans and atmosphere — is The Paris Agreement, ratified by 159 nations as of the summer 2017, aims to halt that warming at According to the 2010 Global Forest Resources Assessment, deforestation releases nearly a billion tons of carbon

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“The idea is to put more carbon into the soil,” said Orr. “That’s not going to be a simple thing because of the natural conditions. But keeping the carbon in the soil and getting that natural vegetation, grazing land etc. thriving again -- that’s the key.”

a view of a beach: China Strives To Combat Desertification For Sustainable Development© Getty Images via Bloomberg China Strives To Combat Desertification For Sustainable Development

An aerial view of planted trees in a desert in China’s Gansu province.

Photographer: Wang He/Getty Images

Last month, at a UN conference on desertification in New Delhi, 196 countries plus the European Union agreed to a declaration that each country would adopt measures needed to restore unproductive land by 2030. The UN team has used satellite imaging and other data to identify the 900 million hectares of degraded land that could be realistically restored. In many cases, the revitalized areas could benefit the local community and host country through increased food supply, tourism and other commercial uses.

Key to returning dry lands to vegetation is the use of fertilizer, said Mansur. “Fertilizers are essential for increasing productivity. Good fertilizer in the right quantity is very good for the soil.”

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Global warming is among the most alarming environmental issues that the world faces today. This phenomenon does not simply involve the significant rise in

But decades of poor agricultural practices in both rich and poor nations have resulted in misuse, either from using the wrong products, using too much fertilizer, or in some areas using too little so that the soil loses its nutrients.

“The problem unfortunately is big and it is growing,” said Mansur. “The main cause of emissions from agriculture is poor land management. But the solutions are known: Sustainable land management, sustainable water management, sustainable soil management.”

Mansur stresses that the problem isn’t about reclaiming desert, but restoring wasteland that was productive before human intervention.

“Don’t mix desertification with desert,” he said. “A desert is an ecosystem. There are deserts on the planet that have to be preserved.”

a close up of a flower: Dry Belts© Bloomberg Dry Belts

Nor is it merely a matter of planting trees, since each area has to be considered in terms of the people who live there and how they can live on the land sustainably.

Kenya, for example plans to plant 2 billion trees on 500,000 hectares to restore 10% of its forest cover, but it is also working on ways to adapt to the changes in climate.

We have to improve our livestock and crops to be drought resistant or drought tolerant,” said Kennedy Ondimu, director of environmental planning and research at the country’s Environment Ministry. “We have to look at developing our indigenous vegetables and indigenous livestock gene bank apart from embracing hybrid crop varieties and livestock varieties. We need to prioritize animal breeding.”

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Cities will be decisive in limiting global warming . More than half of the global population lives in cities. By 2050, two out of three people could be calling a city home. The initiative has calculated that together, these cities can reduce their emissions by nearly 1.3 billion tons of CO2 per year by 2030.

Before answering that we all should learn how the nature has prevented all of us from global warming since so many years. In nature, the absorption of greenhouse gases takes place in many ways but two of the most important ways are :- Absorption in oceans : Since the beginning of the Industrial

In Costa Rica, farmers are using deforested land to produce CO2 neutral coffee, which commands premium prices among consumers. The nation is also replanting rainforest to encourage eco-tourism, which has become the country’s second-biggest earner.

Still, the tide of desertification won’t be easy to turn. In India, more than 20% of the country is considered wasteland and scant water resources are making the situation worse. In Chile, home to the world’s driest desert, the Atacama, the government is spending $138 million improving irrigation as the region’s driest decade on record forces fruit farmers to migrate south to escape the advancing desert. Further north in Brazil, the worst fires in years ravaged the world’s largest rainforest.

an old black smoke coming out of it: Brazilian Amazon Burns At Record Rate© Bloomberg Brazilian Amazon Burns At Record Rate

Amazon forest fire in August.

Photographer: Leonardo Carrato/Bloomberg

Yet, Castro Salazar says dozens of countries are fighting back with programs designed to reverse the loss of farmland and at least 20 nations have major efforts underway to replant lost forests.

“All these countries were able to keep producing the food they needed and growing the forest cover,” he said. “The myth was that in order to increase your productivity and your food sovereignty and security you needed to slash or burn the forest. We documented that it’s not true.”

--With assistance from Anuradha Raghu and Felix Njini.

To contact the reporters on this story: Adam Majendie in Singapore at adammajendie@bloomberg.net;Pratik Parija in New Delhi at pparija@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Adam Majendie, Jon Herskovitz

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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