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Technology Google Confirms It Has Achieved Quantum Supremacy. Now What?

20:15  23 october  2019
20:15  23 october  2019 Source:   popularmechanics.com

Google reportedly attains 'quantum supremacy'

  Google reportedly attains 'quantum supremacy' Its quantum computer can solve tasks that are otherwise unsolvable, a report says.A new quantum computer from Google can reportedly do the impossible.

Google officially announced that it has become the first to achieve quantum supremacy. What does that mean?© F. ARUTE ET AL/NATURE 2019 Google officially announced that it has become the first to achieve quantum supremacy. What does that mean?
  • Google officially announced that it has become the first to achieve quantum supremacy.
  • The company tasked its 54-qubit quantum computer chip with a complex problem: identifying the outputs of a random number generator.
  • Google's computer cracked the calculation in under four minutes, a feat, Google says, that would take the world’s most powerful supercomputer over 10,000 years to complete.

The battle to be the first to achieve quantum supremacy is over, and Google apparently stands victorious.

Google may have just ushered in an era of ‘quantum supremacy’

  Google may have just ushered in an era of ‘quantum supremacy’ ‘The first computation that can only be performed on a quantum processor’Google’s quantum computer was reportedly able to solve a calculation — proving the randomness of numbers produced by a random number generator — in 3 minutes and 20 seconds that would take the world’s fastest traditional supercomputer, Summit, around 10,000 years. This effectively means that the calculation cannot be performed by a traditional computer, making Google the first to demonstrate quantum supremacy.

Google announced today that it has finally pulled off the computing benchmark, after a leak last month hinted at the feat. The company claims its quantum computer runs on a 54-qubit chip called Sycamore and took only 3 minutes and 20 seconds to calculate a problem that would take the world’s fastest computer 10,000 years to solve, Google says.

Classical computers have bits that exist as either a 1 or a 0, while quantum computers have bits, called qubits, that can exist in multiple states at the same time. Thus, quantum computers are thought to be exponentially more powerful than today's most powerful classical supercomputers.

Google may have taken first step towards quantum computing 'supremacy'

  Google may have taken first step towards quantum computing 'supremacy' Google may have made a breakthrough on the path toward creating a viable quantum computer. In a research paper briefly published to NASA's website and only seen by the Financial Times, the company reportedly claims to have achieved a feat known as "quantum supremacy." That is, the search giant says it has successfully created a computer that's able to complete a calculation that is virtually impossible for traditional computers to perform. Google says Sycamore, its 53-qubit quantum computer, was able to calculate a proof in three minutes and 20 seconds that shows the numbers created by a random number generator are in fact random.

To prove Sycamore’s mettle, scientists developed a task that would be incredibly challenging for a classical computer to solve. The team, led by experimental physicist John Martinis of Google and the University of California, Santa Barbara tasked its quantum computer with describing the outputs of a souped-up quantum random number generator. (Only 53 of the chip's 54 qubits were working at the time of the experiment, according to Nature.) The computer accomplished the task in under four minutes.

While demonstrating the feasibility of this tech is exciting, these uber-fast quantum computers are a long way from hitting the commercial market. Still, Google claims even these incredibly forward-thinking feats could have impacts on fields like cryptocurrency, which rely on encryption and the generation of random, secure keys.

For years, the tech giant has been locked in a heated battle with IBM to be the first to achieve this critical milestone. Last month, days after an early version of Google's paper was published on a NASA Ames website, IBM announced its own 53-qubit quantum computer was the fastest in the world.

IBM has refuted Google’s most recent claim. In a preprint paper published earlier this week, the company claimed that, using a different method, it would only take a classical supercomputer 2.5 days to make the calculation instead of 10,000 years, dampening Google's claims. More on this spicy quantum beef as it develops.

Explainer: Google hails 'quantum supremacy', but don't chuck out your PC just yet .
Explainer: Google hails 'quantum supremacy', but don't chuck out your PC just yetGiven the task of finding a pattern in a seemingly random series of numbers, Google's quantum computer produced an answer in 3 minutes and 20 seconds. It estimates that the Summit supercomputer https://www.ibm.com/thought-leadership/summit-supercomputer at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee would take 10,000 years to complete the task.

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