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Technology IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition instead of bans

18:05  06 november  2019
18:05  06 november  2019 Source:   cnet.com

California lawmakers move to block facial recogntion in police body cameras

California lawmakers move to block facial recogntion in police body cameras Law enforcement can't combine the technologies for three years under the bill

San Francisco banned the use of facial recognition software by the police and other agencies on The ban prohibits city agencies from using facial recognition technology, or information gleaned Called Gender Shades, the study reported that systems from IBM and Microsoft were much better at

The co-founder of SenseTime, a Chinese artificial-intelligence startup under fire for the use of its facial - recognition technology in mass-surveillance SenseTime's Bing Xu says his company's facial - recognition technology can be used for good, but needs regulation to protect against abuse.

IBM wants the US government to regulate facial recognition technology -- instead of just banning it outright. In a white paper (PDF) published on Tuesday, IBM called for "precision regulation" of the technology, which it says can restrict potentially harmful uses while still allowing for innovation.

a man and a woman standing in front of a window: An official helps a passenger at Washington Dulles Airport near Washington, DC, with biometric facial recognition scanners. Getty Images © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. An official helps a passenger at Washington Dulles Airport near Washington, DC, with biometric facial recognition scanners. Getty Images a man standing in front of a window: An official helps a passenger at Washington Dulles Airport near Washington, DC, with new biometric facial recognition scanners. © Getty Images

An official helps a passenger at Washington Dulles Airport near Washington, DC, with new biometric facial recognition scanners.

Jeff Bezos says Amazon is developing facial recognition regulations

  Jeff Bezos says Amazon is developing facial recognition regulations Amazon is crafting a set of proposed regulations to govern the use of facial recognition technology, company CEO Jeff Bezos said on Wednesday. © Andrej Sokolow/picture alliance/Getty ImagesFollowing a product event in Seattle, Bezos told reporters that Amazon's public policy team is working on draft rules, which could apply broadly to all facial recognition services, because "there's lots of potential for abuses with that kind of technology, and so you do want regulations." "It's a classic, you know, dual use kind of technology. You can have good things and you can have bad things," Bezos said.

IBM weighed in Tuesday on the policy debate over facial recognition technology, arguing against an outright ban but calling for "precision regulation " to IBM said that instead of banning all facial recognition , policymakers should employ "precision regulation " in cases where there is "greater risk

IBM , one of several big tech companies selling facial recognition programs, is calling on Congress to regulate the technology — but not too much. Why it matters: China has built a repressive surveillance apparatus with facial recognition ; now, some U.S. cities are rolling it out for law enforcement.

"The same technology used in different situations by different users should be governed by different rules," wrote IBM's Christina Montgomery and Ryan Hagemann, in a blog post. "It simply does not make sense to subject a smartphone and a police body camera to the same regulatory treatment."

The white paper was earlier reported on by Axios. IBM didn't immediately respond to a request for additional comment.

San Francisco loosens facial recognition ban to allow newer iPhones .
San Francisco is learning first-hand about the risks of blanket bans on facial recognition. City supervisors have voted to amend a ban on facial recognition in local government to allow the use of FaceID-equipped iPhones and other devices where the technology is included, but other features are considered vital and don't have alternatives. Workers aren't allowed to use the facial recognition tech (they'll have to enter passcodes on iPhones, for example), but they don't have to give up a modern handset just to take calls and answer emails.The change is mirrored in smaller towns.

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