Technology: MIT made an army of tiny, 'virtually indestructible' cheetah robots that can backflip and even play with a soccer ball — see them in action in this new video - The Incredibles immortalized by Harcourt Studio - PressFrom - US
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Technology MIT made an army of tiny, 'virtually indestructible' cheetah robots that can backflip and even play with a soccer ball — see them in action in this new video

01:50  11 november  2019
01:50  11 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com

Annual Investments in Robots Rose to World Record $16.5 Billion

Annual Investments in Robots Rose to World Record $16.5 Billion Robot shipments are expected to jump 39% from 2018 to 2022 from a record annual sales level of $16.5 billion last year, according to the World Robotics report. More than a third of global installations were in China and the top five countries hold 74% of the market. Japan, Korea, U.S and Germany round out this group. China’s investment in robots reached $5.4 billion last year.

MIT made an army of tiny , ' virtually indestructible ' cheetah robots that can backflip and even play with a soccer ball — see them in action in this new video . Boston Dynamics may have made a name for itself by posting videos of its surprisingly lifelike animal-themed robots , but don't

Engineer, trying to build the big picture of #science via pics, videos & links. Italy, North by Northwest. Because they 're robots too?

a group of people playing football on a field© Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • MIT's Mini Cheetah robots are small quadrupedal robots capable of running, jumping, walking, and flipping.
  • In a recently published video, the tiny bots can be seen roaming, hopping, and marching around a field and playing with a soccer ball.
  • They're not consumer products, but MIT hopes that the Mini Cheetah's durable and modular design will make it an ideal tool for researchers.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Boston Dynamics may have made a name for itself by posting videos of its surprisingly lifelike animal-themed robots, but don't count out the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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In a new video published by MIT, the Mini Cheetah robots and their capabilities are shown. The small quadrupedal robots are able to do backflips and hop around, and according to MIT they 're also " virtually indestructible ." "A big part of why we built this robot is that it makes it so easy to

Researchers behind the small quadrupedal robots shared a video online of these mechanical animals running, jumping and even kicking around a soccer ball . The mini cheetah was designed to be ' virtually indestructible ,' recovering with little damage, even if a backflip ends in a spill, MIT News

MIT recently published a new video of its Mini Cheetah robots, small quadrupedal robots that can run, walk, jump, turn, and backflip. The robots weigh about 20 pounds and researchers claim they are "virtually indestructible," according to MIT News.

In the recently posted footage, the tiny bots can be seen ducking, hopping, and marching around a field. In some scenes, the robots are shown playing with a soccer ball, too.

MIT also made headlines earlier this year in March when it showcased its miniature robot performing a backflip.

  MIT made an army of tiny, 'virtually indestructible' cheetah robots that can backflip and even play with a soccer ball — see them in action in this new video © Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In addition to being durable, the Mini Cheetah is designed in such a way that makes it easy to repair and modify if necessary. MIT is hoping that this level of flexibility will make the robots appealing to researchers who wouldn't otherwise have access to robotics.

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What makes the robots appear so incredibly lifelike is their fluidity of movement. They twist and turn and hop around in a manner that mirrors four-legged animals, and knowing that these little fellas are metal and wires instead of flesh and bone fills you with an even mix of wonder and dread.

Mini Cheetah robots are small quadrupedal robots that can run, walk, jump, turn, and backflip . The robots weigh about 20 pounds and researchers claim they are " virtually indestructible ," according to MIT News. In some scenes, the robots are shown playing with a soccer ball , too.

"A big part of why we built this robot is that it makes it so easy to experiment and just try crazy things, because the robot is super robust and doesn't break easily," Benjamin Katz of MIT's Department of Mechanical Engineering told MIT News.

a close up of a football field© Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Boston Dynamics, meanwhile, said in late September that its dog-like Spot robot would be shipping to early customers. That bot is currently being tested to perform tasks such as monitoring construction sites and remotely gas, oil, and power installations.

See below to check out the new video of MIT's Mini Cheetah in action.

See MIT's Mini Cheetah backflipping robots play a mean game of soccer .
MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab posted a new video this week showing off the skills of its Mini Cheetah robots -- lightweight and quadruped robots the university has been developing for awhile now. MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab posted a new video this week showing off the skills of its Mini Cheetah robots -- lightweight and quadruped robots the university has been developing for awhile now. The video shows the dog-like robots hopping up and down, doing backflips and even playing soccer. The new footage almost makes the robots look like they're having fun.

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