Technology: Chrome may shame slow-loading sites with 'speed badging' - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Chrome may shame slow-loading sites with 'speed badging'

00:05  12 november  2019
00:05  12 november  2019 Source:   engadget.com

Google plans to give slow websites a new badge of shame in Chrome

  Google plans to give slow websites a new badge of shame in Chrome Google experimenting with lots of different badge optionsA new badge could appear in the future that’s designed to highlight sites that are “authored in a way that makes them slow generally.” Google will look at historical load latencies to figure out which sites are guilty of slow load times and flag them, and the Chrome team is also exploring identifying sites that will load slowly based on device hardware or network connectivity.

On the other hand, it might reward fast- loading sites with positive so-called " speed badging ." Google is exploring several options for how to make it clear when sites are notably fast or slow . It's not clear when Google will roll out speed badging or even if it'll actually do so (the Chromium blog post on the

"In the future, Chrome may identify sites that typically load fast or slow for users with clear badging ," the Chrome team wrote in a blog post. In addition to (hopefully) convincing the sites ' developers to speed up load times, this should also make it more obvious to Chrome users that slow loading

While there are many, many worse things going on in the world than waiting far too long for a website to load, that's bound to tick off even the most patient of us. Google's not standing idly by, though, as it might start naming and shaming sites that take forever to display their contents in Chrome.

a screenshot of a cell phone

One of the key focuses of the Chrome Developer Summit this year is speeding up the web, and that includes offering developers tools to help their sites and web apps load quicker. Labeling sluggish sites might prompt developers to take advantage of such tools.

a screenshot of a cell phone: Google Chrome speed badging© Provided by Oath Inc. Google Chrome speed badging

The idea is to flag when sites are designed in a way that tends to make them slow, taking into account historical loading times. Eventually, Google might let you know if a page might take a while to display properly because of your device or connection, too. On the other hand, it might reward fast-loading sites with positive so-called "speed badging."

Chrome could soon tag and shame slow-loading websites

  Chrome could soon tag and shame slow-loading websites Google wants to make the web faster, and is planning a system of carrots and sticks for sites depending on their performance.In a blog post, developers Addy Osmani, Ben Greenstein and Bryan McQuade from the Chrome team explain that they believe "the web can do better", and explain how a label system might work.

“In the future, Chrome may identify sites that typically load fast or slow for users with clear badging ,” explains a blog post from the Chrome team. Google is experimenting with having a loading screen (splash screen) to warn Chrome users, or a loading progress bar that would appear green if the site

You may initially think Chrome itself is the reason for the slowness you’ve noticed, although it could be a virus or malware to blame. Depending on the type, these malicious additions to your computer install files that could affect Chrome by launching programs and windows that negatively affect its speed .

Google is exploring several options for how to make it clear when sites are notably fast or slow. Among the ideas it's experimenting with are changing the color of the progress bar (i.e. green for quick-loading sites) or displaying a loading message for sites that crawl onto your screen.

It's not clear when Google will roll out speed badging or even if it'll actually do so (the Chromium blog post on the idea doesn't firmly commit to bringing the feature to Chrome). Still, it's clear Google hopes to make the web faster for everyone -- even if it might have to embarrass some developers to make it happen.

Chromium Blog

Google Chrome, Firefox and Cloudflare add HTTP/3 protection .
Cloudflare customers will now be able to turn on HTTP/3 support for their domains.Cloudflare announced that beginning today, customers will be able to turn on HTTP/3 support for their domains by enabling an option in their dashboards. Now when users visit a Cloudflare-hosted website using an HTTP/3-capable client, the connection will be automatically upgraded to the new protocol.

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